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Thread: ADFG Burning Duck Blinds

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    Default ADFG Burning Duck Blinds

    Many of you know that the ADFG has and plans to burn more duck blinds on the Palmer Hay Flats. With godzillion square miles of uninhabited land in Alaska it would seem hardly necessary to burn some blinds for example that have been there over 20 years or more.

    For a different persepective and a more ratioinal one I believe read this article from a recent issue of WILDFOWL magazine.

    It describes how on the crowded and settled east coast duck blinds are allowed and they have over 300 years of waterfowling history.

    http://www.wildfowlmag.com/locked-ou...lic-water.html

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    Member akblackdawg's Avatar
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    Have they burned any thus far, say in the past 5 years? Maybe they want to rebuild them with more modern blinds, flip up tops, propane heat built in, airators placed in the water to keep water open for hunting, cots for naps, built in portapotties. Bud
    Wasilla

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    Quote Originally Posted by akblackdawg View Post
    Have they burned any thus far, say in the past 5 years? Maybe they want to rebuild them with more modern blinds, flip up tops, propane heat built in, airators placed in the water to keep water open for hunting, cots for naps, built in portapotties. Bud
    I think they burned on on the far east end on the Knik side that was used by the Quick Tow guys. I heard there was a note on one that is out by the big battleship/piano blind in the middle (towards the tree line), my guess would be that they will take out that big blind as well. If memory serves it all started with a land swap out there about 5 or so years ago, but I could be wrong.

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    I'm not a duck hunter but what are the rules and regs that govern it as a permanent structure? Curious because other hunt-related structures have limitations i.e bear bait stands.
    We do not go to the green woods and crystal waters to rough it, we go to smooth it. We get it rough enough at home; in towns and cities; in shops, offices, stores, banks anywhere that we may be placed

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    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    They did this on the Kenai flats a few years ago. Some of those blinds were called community blinds as they had been there many many years.
    This was mainly because they made some new rules/regs that you had to be 1/2 mile from the road to hunt there. This one significantly cut the area available to hunt.
    They did change it to 1/4 mile after enough complaints. But unfortunately the blinds had already been destroyed.
    Hopefully they can be persuaded to let these blinds remain on the hayflats.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

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    DNR has a process for obtaining a permit to build/own a structure on public land. They ended up grandfathering in many cabins on the Su Flats when the rules changed decades ago. However, you have to still follow the process and obtain permits.

    Since the Palmer Flats are a wildlife refuge and a public use area it will be seeing more action by the State to get it into compliance with the rules for public lands.

    Ownerstate, you missed one very important aspect of that east coast system which is right in the title - duck hunters locked out of hunting areas. It is now used by private land owners to lock up the shore line so that no one can hunt. That system is heavily abused by the newly wealthy urbanizing the east coast rural areas. What once was a good idea to spread hunters out is now allowing the wealthy to sleep in without shotguns going off in their back yards at sunrise.

  7. #7

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    From Ownerstate's referred article - Thanks Ownerstate!

    Not surprisingly, some hunters abuse the system and license ghost blinds in an effort to control a larger section of water. Virginia allows individuals to license no more than two blinds, but groups of hunters band together to essentially shut down large sections of water, creating their own refuges.

    DECENT SPOTS SCARCE
    The Currituck County Game Commission isn’t trying to restrict hunting opportunities, according to Markert. Instead, the goal is to keep order and maintain the high-quality hunting opportunities already available on Currituck. In fact, he said, the commission tries to accommodate hunters by posting blind sites as they become available through attrition. As of late February, at least a dozen sites were unclaimed, but North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission waterfowl biologist Joe Fuller said the available blinds tend to be in marginal locations.



    This is the same as leaving decoys out. It is done to "shut down sections of water, creating their own refuges" and "unclaimed sites tend to be in marginal locations".

    Start burnin' . . .

    and as for your decoys:

    . . . pick 'em up.

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    I believe that that is some peoples thought on blinds and such=if mine is that that area is "locked Up" and no one else should be there. If it is a public place then all the more power to who ever gets there first to use the area and the hunters that get there 2nd that day should just move on to another area.

    Some states have laws that say all blind materials cannot be errected before such a date and all material used on such blind must be removed like 6 months later on a yearly basis.

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    Member sameyer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kasilofchrisn View Post
    They did this on the Kenai flats a few years ago. Some of those blinds were called community blinds as they had been there many many years.
    This was mainly because they made some new rules/regs that you had to be 1/2 mile from the road to hunt there. This one significantly cut the area available to hunt.
    They did change it to 1/4 mile after enough complaints. But unfortunately the blinds had already been destroyed.
    Hopefully they can be persuaded to let these blinds remain on the hayflats.
    Sort of…the blinds and the distance were separate issues. The blinds had been there on DNR ground for some thirty years and they had seemingly been “grandfathered in when DNR took over the area in 1983. The blinds were, by their definition, permanent structures and therefore illegal. For reasons that have still not been really admitted to, and after all the years of basically turning a blind eye, DNR decided to remove the blinds in 2008. This caused a fair amount of anxiety in the local duck hunters, who in turn began working toward assuring the flats would remain open to duck hunters. I wrote the original proposal to change the discharge of shotguns in waterfowl season from ½ mile from a dwelling to ¼ mile from a dwelling that affectively opened up a good deal of waterfowl hunting areas.
    DNR has never given any on the blinds however, it may be possible to apply for a permit for a temporary permanent structure.
    The only area this affects is out about a half mile east and a half mile to the north (the pullout) on the left hand side going into Kenai.
    As to community blinds, if they are on public land they are community blinds and there is some special permit issued. The City of Kenai owns the balance of land on the Kenai River flats and has no problem with hunters building blinds. Unfortunately the best and biggest pond is on DNR property where they are not allowed. Layouts!

  10. #10

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    anyone who thinks the answer to this issue is to follow the example of the eastern seaboard is a complete idiot. I spent years hunting those blinds and be ready to shell out thousands per year for ONE blind. Unless you have big bucks you will be locked out of most of the good hunting. 4 2X4s stuck in the mud count as a blind and you can't hunt anywhere near it. guys build one good blind and then 3 or 4 fake blinds on either side thus securing over a mile of shoreline. lots of people try to get the laws changed but the guys with the blinds are the guys with the money and they win every time. its pretty sad and i'd hate to see AK go to something like that

  11. #11

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    I used to hunt the Susitna Flats near the Little Su. Many of the shack owners have built permanent blinds. Some of those blinds are on marginally productive potholes. Those I don't mind. However, there are blinds on consistently productive potholes. That is not a problem until the blind "owner" comes out and kicks you out - or tries to kick you out.

    As for a temporary blind, it is not a big deal to set up near a root wad and use the root wad as a blind. I used to carry lightweight camo that I draped around driftwood sticks I placed in the mud. The blind wasn't particularly comfortable but it was set in a good spot where the birds wanted to be.

    That's the magic of remaining mobile and not being tied to a permanent blind. You find the birds, run them out, do a quick blind set, wait for them to come back, and start shooting. I seemed to consistently out shoot most of the guys anchored to their permanent blinds.

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    There is truth to your statment about mobil blinds being more productive. It's nice to have all the comforts of home in a permanenant blind sometimes, especially in heavy rain.

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    Mile of shoreline? I guess thats why you make sure YOU are always the first in the marsh to get that point you like...heheeh and then complain about decoys left out. I don't see much difference really as I bet you hunted Hay Flats MORE than any other hunter this year.

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    Burn em down!!

    Half of the "permanent blinds" are still out there because the architect of the structure was too lazy to take his crap back out.

    Love them winter bonfires......

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    Yea, but then you were too LAZY to ever build one and spend a lot of time hunting the 48 and runnin' your yap here!

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    Your welcome for the article Jake, i disagree with your conclusions though. There is little difference between people in groups having different members take up areas like they do at fishcamps, hunting camps, traplines and etc., than duck blinds/cabins/caches.

    While I may agree that the circumstances on the east coast may be extreme , they are extreme here in opposit direction.

    In Alaska we like to go to extrems it seems. hense the book called "Going to Extremes" about Alaska.

    It seems that here we must try to create this fake Kombiya, fantasy land where nothing is touched so that people in the 48 and the rest of the world can go, ahhhhhh, Alaska, that unspoiled place.

    I like the idea of seeing a few blinds in a DUCK MARSH, just like in most of the rest of North America. IT gives a sense of place and what we and the marsh are all about.

    Just like we know that Caribou have increased and thrived by the oil pipeline, it is misguided people that think that all should be steril and devoid of mans hand. IT took me many years to learn this as I was once a total wilderness advocate and spent years living in such places.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ownerstate View Post
    Yea, but then you were too LAZY to ever build one
    Ok, ya got me, I'm too lazy to build a permanent blind on public land....yep

    Quote Originally Posted by ownerstate View Post
    Yea, but then you spend a lot of time hunting the 48
    Yep, I do, and love the opportunity to do this.......got one or two more trips planned!!

    Quote Originally Posted by ownerstate View Post
    Yea, but then you were too LAZY to ever build one and spend a lot of time hunting the 48 and runnin' your yap here!
    Your incredibly easy. Predictable even.....

  18. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by ownerstate View Post
    spend a lot of time hunting the 48 and runnin' your yap here!
    DAllen number of posts = 120
    Ownerstate number of posts = 159
    it never ends with the guy

  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by ownerstate View Post
    Mile of shoreline? I guess thats why you make sure YOU are always the first in the marsh to get that point you like...heheeh and then complain about decoys left out. I don't see much difference really as I bet you hunted Hay Flats MORE than any other hunter this year.
    you talking about laws you have no clue about. getting there early or leaving decoys out is fine but building fake blinds to lock out other hunters for decades is another. I'm all for blinds on public land as long as they are first come first serve. down there the min distance rules apply regardless of weather the blind is occupied or not. guys who hunt ducks 1 or 2 times a year after deer seasons over will use fake blinds to lock the guys who chase ducks every weekend. you prob dont have to worry about stuff like that tho since you can make 60 yard shots with your fancy hex shot.
    I don't see much difference really as I bet you hunted Hay Flats MORE than any other hunter this year.
    Thanks for noticing all the hard work and effort i put into chasing ducks this year. It really paid off and we had a great season thats not over yet. still have a few hunts on the flats left this year and then i'm going to pull a DAllen and go hunt the lower 48 a bunch

  20. #20

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    spend a lot of time hunting the 48 and runnin' your yap here!


    DAllen number of posts = 120
    Ownerstate number of posts = 159
    it never ends with the guy
    Ownerstate has been using that moniker for only a month, Dallen five years. That makes Dallen 60 posts per year. Ownerstate about 1900 posts per year if you count the next eleven months.

    Now who's running his yap?

    I think that Ownerstate is trying to convince us to accept his positions on things like ammo selection, hunting etiquette, etc, by being a constant drone. If you say it long enough and loud enough and nobody complains then it must be true.

    No matter how many half-baked reasons that Ownerstate gives for building permanent blinds or leaving his decoys out he's not gonna wear me down by his constant barrage of twisted logic.

    As for one, I am not a Barack Obama fan. I am not a liberal. I am not for regulating the heck out of Alaska. However, if it takes regulations to force courtesy out of "I Own The State" kind of guys, then so be it.

    If we get new hunting regulations it will be because of Ownerstate and those who share his self-serving point of view.

    Give it some good thought, Mr. Ownerstate.

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