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Thread: How much fuel to keep on hand for the generator for those just in case moment's

  1. #1

    Default How much fuel to keep on hand for the generator for those just in case moment's

    I just went and bought four extra 5.gallon gas cans for keeping extra fuel on hand for just in case moment's if i get snowed in and can not get out for a couple days .The basic plan is to use the extra fuel in the honda generator to help charge the cabin battery bank .

    I now have 8 5-gallon gas cans on hand with each can is treated with the gas fuel stabilzer product and i do rotate though them as it need with the empty cans are refilled and treated as need .

    So 30.gallons of a gas should keep a small honda EU3000 going for a few week's of just charging the battery bank as it needed

  2. #2

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    You can't have too much. About 4 or 5 years ago Hope/Sunrise was without power for 10 days (Dec.24 through Jan. 3) and it was cold. I went through massive amount of fuel. There are two other problems: 1) "Air" cooled generators are not intended for prolonged use, and will (And DID) vibrate apart. 2) The roads were snowed shut, and more fuel was not available. Chugach Electric did eventually bring in two huge generators to power each town.

  3. #3

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    Well, that's actually 40 gallons, not 30. To figure out how much fuel to keep on hand, you'll need additional data.
    1. The EU3000 includes several different models, with different fuel efficiencies. Check your manual or look it up at http://www.hondapowerequipment.com/products/generators/ so you can figure out how long your fuel might last at rated load.
    2. Consider not only your generator but also your load, by checking the charger for your battery bank to find out how many watts per hour it pulls. (You usually get greater efficiency when you match rated output with load.)
    3. If you're running off of batteries, figure out how long a full charge lasts when you're snowed in (and probably using more electricity), so you can figure out how often you'll need to charge.
    4. Check with your battery manufacturer to find out how deeply to discharge before recharging, depending on the type of batteries in your bank, and on your inverter.
    That's all from memory, so I might be forgetting something. Doing a simulated test run in mild weather is a good way to collect data on your system. Keeping an energy log is always a good idea for home power systems, it can give you reasonable answers, simply by trial and error.
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  4. #4
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    Use AVgas rather than regular cheapo car gas as the AVgas will last virtually indefinitely. Even with stabilizer, the cargas will only last six months minimum.
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  5. #5
    Member Ak Bird Brain's Avatar
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    Like Seraphina said run your generator for a test period while charging your batteries to see how much fuel it actually consumes at that load.
    I have a Honda EU2000, 1/2 gallon lasts me 8 hours of use (with 1 light, TV and satellite dish plugged in). If I only run it 8 hours a day a single 5 gallon can should last me 10 days.
    And don't forget the oil! I only use my generator 2-3 times a year so I change the oil every fall. If your going to be constantly using yours don't forget about oil changes.
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    Quote Originally Posted by AGL4now View Post
    You can't have too much. About 4 or 5 years ago Hope/Sunrise was without power for 10 days (Dec.24 through Jan. 3) and it was cold. I went through massive amount of fuel. There are two other problems: 1) "Air" cooled generators are not intended for prolonged use, and will (And DID) vibrate apart. 2) The roads were snowed shut, and more fuel was not available. Chugach Electric did eventually bring in two huge generators to power each town.
    Hope and Sunrise are two towns?


    Henry, how about just pretending the power is out and seeing how long a 5 gallon can lasts?

  7. #7
    Member dkwarthog's Avatar
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    We burn far less than a gallon a day in a honda eu2000. And that is running 6-8 hrs per day (wintertime). 40 gallons of gas would last us a couple of months and we never need to worry about batteries (except AA's for headlamps).

    I would also invest in a half dozen bottles of seafoam to keep the carb clean otherwise those hondas have a tendancy to surge....

  8. #8

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    i have done the whole thing to see how far the 5 gallon gas can will go on a trail run of shutting down the place down and running the generator to recharge the battery bank .i did get about one week's worth of run time out of the 5.gallon gas can of charging the batties as it was need .

  9. #9
    Thewolfwatching
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    ROFL!!! okay.. Sima, the 'burning one..' excellent advice!

    Quote Originally Posted by Seraphina View Post
    Well, that's actually 40 gallons, not 30. To figure out how much fuel to keep on hand, you'll need additional data.
    1. The EU3000 includes several different models, with different fuel efficiencies. Check your manual or look it up at http://www.hondapowerequipment.com/products/generators/ so you can figure out how long your fuel might last at rated load.
    2. Consider not only your generator but also your load, by checking the charger for your battery bank to find out how many watts per hour it pulls. (You usually get greater efficiency when you match rated output with load.)
    3. If you're running off of batteries, figure out how long a full charge lasts when you're snowed in (and probably using more electricity), so you can figure out how often you'll need to charge.
    4. Check with your battery manufacturer to find out how deeply to discharge before recharging, depending on the type of batteries in your bank, and on your inverter.
    That's all from memory, so I might be forgetting something. Doing a simulated test run in mild weather is a good way to collect data on your system. Keeping an energy log is always a good idea for home power systems, it can give you reasonable answers, simply by trial and error.

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