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Thread: Health related hunting question

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    Member mod elan's Avatar
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    Default Health related hunting question

    What is the hunting future like for someone in their early 60's after getting a knee replaced? Doctor isn't painting too bright a picture Active outdoors person who likes snowmachines, atv's, and recently got into hiking and likes it.

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    You can do anything if you set your own pace.I'm over 60 and never owned a wheeler or sno-go and can still get to the top
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

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    Quote Originally Posted by Amigo Will View Post
    You can do anything if you set your own pace.
    Ditto Amigo Will. You may however need to modify some of your methods or set somewhat less ambitious goals. A good friend once said to me he "can still plan for time or for distance, but no longer for both on the same trip."
    Inspiration is simply the momentary cessation of stupidity.

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    Member algonquin's Avatar
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    Just finished an Elk hunt in Colorado at 7-8000'. I only have one lung and live on the coast in AK, so the alt. was tough and something I'm not use to. I just had to stop lots when climbing, so as other have said you set the pace and you can do anything you set your mind to. By the way I'm 62 and also have a bad back ( broke it in three places) and arthrid's, affraid to stop! Go for the gold- as the old saying goes you aren't getting any younger and my fav. one- getting old isn't for sissy's. Tom

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    I had my heart rewired with an ablation procedure last year and Mayo Clinic cured my lung disease but left me with two leather bags to breath with. I took a dall sheep and moose this year as well as a couple sacks of waterfowl. I'll be 70 in a few weeks.

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    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    Slowing down is OK and set a more realistic pace but stopping leads to death.

    I think its Steve's (stid) tagline that says-"Don't let the things you can't stop you from doing the things you can..." I like that.

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    mod elan,

    That's a tough question that has a lot of variables. If the knee is the only limiting factor then you know what to work on. Physical Therapy can be a pain, both figuratively and literally, but it is worth it's weight in gold. Those folks are paid to physically train you back to your max capability. Once PT is over it's up to you to continue your exercises to complete the rebuilding of strength and then to maintain the strength. PT folks get you going but it's up to you to continue on your own to gain max benefit. At 60 years old this will be something that you can do but it will take longer than a 20 year old. As for the artificial knee itself, it can do most of the things that the natural knee will do. Some people say that it's more temperature sensitive, others don't make that claim. If your knee is in a condition now that rates replacement, then the new knee will be liberating. Get a good surgeon, get the best knee you can afford (discuss the longest lasting knee with the surgeon), DO THE PT early and faithfully, and you can have a lot more activities that you are probably able to do now. As for the knee itself...these things can and do wear out. Discuss with the surgeon the estimated life span for the knee given your anticipated activity level. There may be some activities that you will not want to do...impact loading on the knee joint (running, frequent heavy backpacking, jumping, etc).

    I'm going to include some links for you to look at.

    http://www.zimmer.com/z/ctl/op/globa...38/template/PC

    http://www.totalkneeweb.com/knee-replacement-faqs

    http://www.georgetownuniversityhospi...pt.cfm?id=1148

    http://www.mwmc.com/services/orthope...ement-faq.aspx

    about a revision surgery: http://www.hss.edu/conditions_revisi...ement-faqs.asp

    When you do your internet research look for .EDU websites or websites that are from major medical centers for more evidence-based-practice information as opposed to lesser established sources. For your education I recommend looking through the links for the limitations you can have after surgery and I recommend looking at the link for revision surgery. If you live to 100 years old you may likely need a revision.

    I'm 50, an RN, been in health care for >21 years, have had several ortho procedures myself, and I'll need new left knee in a few years too. Over the years I've worked with several patients who have had joint replacements so what I've written is from experience. There are some sharp people on AOD, some of which may have had knee replacements or are health professionals, perhaps they can add more to the conversation and get you some good additional info.

    I wish you well, good luck!

    MyTime

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    I agree completely with MyTime... getting physical therapy and being faithful with your exercises can't be stressed enough. It's the only way to get the most out of your surgery and new knee and back to the great outdoors

    What is your doctor saying exactly?

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    Supporting Member Old John's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mod elan View Post
    What is the hunting future like for someone in their early 60's after getting a knee replaced? Doctor isn't painting too bright a picture Active outdoors person who likes snowmachines, atv's, and recently got into hiking and likes it.
    Mod Elan
    I'm fast approaching the 4th qtr of my first century. 7 yrs ago I had a knee replaced. (Nov right after hunting season).. It's no picnic but once you get it done, your biggest regret will be that you put it off so long.... My surgeon advised against jogging and jumping... he didn't say anything about snowmachine riding.. so a couple weeks after surgery, My son and I headed for the cabin. an 80 mile round trip.. We got stuck in the overflow on the lake and put about 3 miles on snow shoes breaking a trail out of that mess... The following Monday I reported in to EAFB Hosp for my scheduled PT, they asked me if I'd had a nice weekend, and what had I done.. When I told them they called in the Surgeon, gave me a thorough exam and pronounced me OK.. as an after thought the Surgeon suggested that if I could snowshoe a couple miles, the PT people probably couldn't do much more for me ...!!! I have gone on a couple fly in caribou hunts, and I haven't missed a moose season yet.. In fact the new knee has made hunting much easier, and much more enjoyable. I also enjoy snow shoe-ing with the grandkids looking for grouse... Now i am being treated for COPD so I move a little slower, but I still get there and back..... (get er done).....!

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    mod elan,

    Shop around, not all surgeons approach things the same way. You make want to check with Dr. Frost in anchorage. He's an orthopedic surgeon and teaches the archery class. I think he only does arthroscopic stuff, but I bet he could help you explore all your options.

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    Member mod elan's Avatar
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    Incredible! Ask and ye shall receive. I would like to thank each and every one of you for the information provided. I should clarify this is not me. Although I may feel it at times! I am gathering info for dad. Being a mechanic forever has taken it's toll and recently something happened at work and ever since the pain is unbearable. Coming from him this is bad! He's of the old school where you wait to the last minute before deciding to go under the knife. I am not sure with his insurance if he is locked into a specific surgeon, but the conversation was not good. Limited bending, can't kneel anymore, no atv/snowmachine riding, very limited hiking with little to no weight, etc...... Has him thinking if he'll be able to do his job afterwards. Curiosity also prompted this request since I may be headed down the same path eventually.

    Thank you for the websites. I will go through them with him and also will have him check with Dr. Frost. Thanks again!

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    Hey bronco is a medic I have a cutco knife so when it's your time to go under the knife we have you covered. On a serious note hope it all works out for your dad. Talked to a good friend recently had hip replacement and he said it hurts more than before the surgery very limited walking he is like you and your dad a lifelong mechanic. Probably the most important thing take it easy at first everyone responds differently...

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    Member TWB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 323 View Post
    Hey bronco is a medic I have a cutco knife
    You know March Madness is coming- Men's vasectomy's back alley sale.
    We do not go to the green woods and crystal waters to rough it, we go to smooth it. We get it rough enough at home; in towns and cities; in shops, offices, stores, banks anywhere that we may be placed

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    Member mossyhorn's Avatar
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    Like someone mentioned, shop around. There are some fantastic surgeons and there are some that I wouldn't let touch me with a 10 foot stick. I work in the imaging field of healthcare and one of my jobs is with an orthopedist who does a lot of knees. I see people that wish they would have done it sooner. There are people that are very active like yourself that are able to return and do most of the things they use to. No you can't go out and run marathons, although some idiots do, but if you follow a good rehab program and do what you're suppose to then there's no reason that you can't go out and enjoy life.

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    This thread is very inspirational to anyone over 50 I think.

    Not that I am, of course, but I'm imagining King reading this thread's every post.

    Back to seriousness, I was taught to hunt long ago by a (then) 84 year old man. How incredible is that? He could do things that neither his son, friends, nor I could do. But he could show us, and he did. Wow.

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    Default ortho surgeons

    Quote Originally Posted by mossyhorn View Post
    Like someone mentioned, shop around. There are some fantastic surgeons and there are some that I wouldn't let touch me with a 10 foot stick.
    I too know both. I won't mention the latter by name, as per forum rules, but so far as the former (fantastic ortho surgeons) you can't go wrong with Dr. Leslie Dean at AFOC in Anchorage. If you look into her background, you'll find:

    - she hasn't seen an elbow in 15 years (specializes in wrists/hands)
    - she has fixed a few Iditarod mushers' wrists that have gone awry (some of they could have gone to any surgeon nationwide)
    - and my personal experience with her is that she turned my untenable situation into a great one, and I have since greatly challenged mine with much physical lifting, i.e., the wrist that she fixed with a very radical surgery a few years back.

    Just after that radical surgery, I was touch-typing just 2 days later. I thought it'd be more like 2 months.

    I would not choose her as my partner of choice in cribbage or canasta (she's a different breed, so to speak), but neither would I let any other surgeon work on my wrists.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TWB View Post
    You know March Madness is coming- Men's vasectomy's back alley sale.
    So you want a piece of candy or something? Shouldn't you be making a pot of coffee or something?

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    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
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    Following a successful knee replacement surgery....your father might become a better hunter.
    Years ago I shot a bunch of game animals simply because I hiked umpteen miles a day. Sooner or later I was bound to bump into a game animal. I now attempt to hunt smarter, and a little slower. I cover less mileage, but use more time with glass pressed to my eye sockets. So he may become a more efficient hunter, although I think the long approaches typical of sheep hunts may not be as do-able for him following the surgery.

    In addition, think of other lifestyle changes that he might be able to incorporate into his life. Large, "round" hunters put a considerable strain on their knees and all other joints with each and every step. I know of a few hunters who became "rounder" and less conditioned as they became more grey, I mean more silver haired. Their effective "hard hunting" days ended.
    While other "round" hunters I know have changed their dietary and physical conditioning habits, lost considerable amounts of body weight, and added considerable years of effective hiking and effective hunting to their lives.
    Furthermore, this sounds like one of those sensational opportunities in life for you to spend more time with your father assisting him with his knee rehab efforts!

    Although time consuming within our busy and multi dimensional lives, when his "new" knee can handle the stress, I believe he and all of us can hike our way to both greater emotional and physical health.

    Good Luck and let us know how this deal works out for him and you.

    AlaskaTrueAdventure/Dennis

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    Old Jimmy Anderson, the A&P at Chena Marina, had both knees replaced. I don't think he slowed down one bit. My dad had one knee replaced, and hobbled around until he died this spring. The difference I believe was that my dad did not do the physical therapy. He did not force himself through the early pain to make the leg work through a full range of motion. If Jimmy's hangar had not burned this past year I bet he'd be in, under, or around a plane working right now.
    Tell your father good luck,
    ARR

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    Like my old deceased friend, Cordova guide Ed King told my, "Never quit walking". (only if it doesn't worsen the condition)

    Best advice I ever got, 20 years ago, since then I've had 2 heart surgeries, 3 collapsed lung and repair surgeries, complete
    left shoulder repair, hernia patches and on June 2nd of this year 2 lower back surgeries, and still putting off 3 more, a few other minor things.
    I walk 2-4 miles each day since the most recent. 8 days after my major heart surgery I was in 'bear camp'. I still carry a needle and tubing in case any more collapsed lungs, as 2 out of 3 occurred out in the field.

    Hopefully your Dad finds a good Doc and can do the PT to the max, following the Docs order is a must, but its easy to go beyond what is recommended and get rather sore, its hard to slow down when that not your nature. Nutrition can play a big role in the healing process as well as attitude, have the best of both.

    Best of luck to your Dad, and you, for your obvious care, concern and wanting to help!
    Last edited by DEDWUF; 10-26-2011 at 09:43. Reason: spelling

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