Results 1 to 20 of 20

Thread: best high wind tents

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    wasilla
    Posts
    538

    Default best high wind tents

    i know that tents have been beat to death here...but if you were going to kodiak or the peninsula which tent would you take?.....i was just reading through the goat hunting page & this got me thinking...i currently have a 4-man xpg expedition tent but haven't had it out in the real world winds yet.......

  2. #2
    Member hoose35's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Soldotna, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    2,890

    Default

    can't speak from experience here, but I would, and want to, get a bombshelter.
    Responsible Conservation > Political Allocation

  3. #3
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Talkeetna
    Posts
    5,714

    Default

    Bombshelters are the bomb when you want a large tent with lots of height inside AND be able to withstand wind. However, there are a bunch of tents out there that are really designed well for high winds. Nallo's, NorthFace domes, and Eureka K2 XT domes are all very good wind tents. Tent survival is as much choosing a proper place to pitch your tent and using ALL the tie downs as much as anything.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

  4. #4
    Member TWB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    3,573

    Default

    Hilleberg Saivo. 40 mph winds earlier this year out in Eureka. Freak storm brought ice snow and high winds. Tent walls barely even rattled. Love this tent!!
    We do not go to the green woods and crystal waters to rough it, we go to smooth it. We get it rough enough at home; in towns and cities; in shops, offices, stores, banks anywhere that we may be placed

  5. #5
    Member hodgeman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Delta Junction AK
    Posts
    4,055

    Default

    Bibler...I'd swear that thing is made of sheet tin. No rattles at 40mph. What a bunker.

  6. #6
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    5,765

    Default

    You might want to check out our general Tents Page in the gear section; also, I wrote a review of Terra Nova the other day in our product reviews; expensive but well worth the $$. Another brand / model I would recommend is the North Face VE 24. I believe you can buy one off the rack in Anchorage at Alaska Mountaineering and Hiking. Look at what the climbers use; it works for the worst weather you'll see out there.

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    220

    Default

    I'm not sure if you can get them anymore but Sportsman's carried Eureka's version of the Arctic Oven/bomb shelter, the Alaskan Tundra. I've had blistering gusts hit mine. It takes having all the lines staked down. It's nowhere near as nice as an Arctic Oven but it's still very well built and stout. My only gripe about any of these kind of tents is zero visibility when you're buttoned down for the storm. I'm not sure how that would get remedied and still keep it a super tough tent.

    The bombshelter style tents take time to set up, and all that time is spent hammering stakes into the ground. I believe there are over twenty on my tent. The tent stake selection is very important. Having at least four of those monster yellow stakes in the event of soft ground is important. I have about eight rock crushers for the corners too. The rest, I just take my chances on the ones that came with the tent. I haven't had any problems yet.

    If you're not backpacking, having more room is awesome. These square type tents allow two hunters for two weeks with all their gear. We put two cots inside, utilize the room underneath for storage and gear spreading (cuts way down on the pack/repack activities) It makes for a real home. If the weather gets REALLY bad, you can fold up the cots, bring in the chairs, and really ride out a storm in comfort.

    But the tents are heavy and take time to set up. I don't think I'd use it if I had to set it up every day. It's an awesome base camp set up, terrible float trip tent I think. It and my Aire Traveler made up the heaviest part of our fly-in load.

    I've included a picture just because.


  8. #8
    Member fullkurl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Alaska/Idaho
    Posts
    2,162

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hodgeman View Post
    Bibler...I'd swear that thing is made of sheet tin. No rattles at 40mph. What a bunker.
    +1...same goes for rab and Integral Designs MK series.
    Proud to be an American!

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    3,568

    Default

    Our Arctic Ovens have seen winds in excess of 70 mph. They are the only tent I'll even consider on Kodiak. One time a guy went deer hunting with us and he took a Bomb shelter.
    When we came back home he sold it and bought an Arctic Oven. They both did great in the wind but the AO was much drier inside due to the dual layers as it wicked moisture away.
    Tennessee

  10. #10
    Member Timber Smith's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Sovereign Mountain, Alaska USA
    Posts
    211

    Default

    The only small tents that can reliably handle the potential extreme weather conditions of Kodiak Island or the Alaska Peninsula are 4 season and tents designed for mountaineering. There are a few different models from the top manufacturers, IMO Hilleberg being among the best. Mountaineering tents are designed to handle high winds, rain, sleet and snowload.

    Larger tents, Barneys Bombshelter and Alaska Tent and Tarp Arctic Oven are proven performers in severe weather. I have little experience with Arctic ovens because we use Bombshelters. During extended blows (3 to 4 days in duration) on the Alaska Peninsula with winds in excess of 100mph, we have had Bombshelters come down a time or two. (Bob knows about these incidents.) Our tents are always placed in the best possible locations that terrain allows, staked and tied off as best as possible.

    I am also an advocate of being prepared with a backup shelter of another tent or at least a bivy sack in case your main tent comes down or you are unable to make it back to base. I've had to go to ground in a bivy when forced to drop the tents in a major storm when set up in a exposed vulnerable location and when caught out.

    Unless you have experienced this type of weather, it is very hard to believe and you need to be prepared because your life will depend on it. Quality shelter is not cheap, but when necessary it is priceless. TS


    "AND YE SHALL KNOW THE TRUTH AND THE TRUTH SHALL MAKE YOU FREE."

    JOHN VIII - XXXII

  11. #11
    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    2,162

    Default

    That's my understanding. The 4-season, or mountaineering tents are engineered for wind resistance. Among these tents, 2 designs seem to excel: 1). a tunnel-type tent, ideal when weight matters (Hillbergs, etc), and 2). a heavier, strong-framed tent. Arctic Ovens are a great example.

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,293

    Default

    Hilleberd Jannu was my choice and I've never wanted anything else. The next hunt will be spring bear on the AK Peninsula. No worries about the Hilleberg holding up.

    The first thing a guy needs to define in this discussion is acceptable size and weight. Bomb Shelters are great base camp tents but aren't much fun to pack. My Hilleberg is an honest 7 pounds and compact to carry with all the trimmings but it's a snug fit for two guys and their clothes. Both have thier niche. If weight isn't an issue? Make my dream tent a Weatherport with a wood floor. :-)

  13. #13
    Member mjm316's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    820

    Default

    I just got back from Kodiak and let me tell you it blew and blew! We had 2 10x10 arctic ovens that worked flawlessly. My first time in one of these tents and I highly recommend if weight or $$ is not an issue
    Tomorrow isn't promised. "Never delay kissing a pretty girl or opening a bottle of whiskey." E. Hemingway

  14. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,293

    Default

    Another thing to consider when choosing a tent is how easy it is to set up. Especially for one man to set up in bad weather. Sometimes the tent needs to not only withstand the wind but needs to be set up in it. Like Timber said above, if you can't depend on the tent you'd better have an alternative.

  15. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Kodiak, AK
    Posts
    640

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mjm316 View Post
    I just got back from Kodiak and let me tell you it blew and blew!
    Aww c'mon it was just a little breezy Seriously, not the best hunting weather the last couple of weeks, this week looks to be much of the same.

  16. #16
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Minden, NV
    Posts
    18

    Default

    The traditional solution still works. A heavy canvas wall tent with a wood stove has worked for 35 years. I was in a 50-60 mph rain storm hunting elk this September for 20 hours with no problems. I use sawbuck style poles, but a frame is stronger.

  17. #17
    Member tiger15's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    211

    Default

    I, too, stayed in an AO8 for the last two weeks of October on Kodiak. With winds in excess of 50mph, my partner and I stayed warm and dry. Once again, I am thoroughly impressed with the AO. We even had one small limb land on the tent one night and it did no damage at all.

  18. #18
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks Area
    Posts
    7,272

    Default

    Just returned from 10 days on Kodiak, we had days of winds in excess of 50 mph. Used a Kifaru Sawtooth with stove 12lbs and the new Pipeline from Tent and tarp. Both tents performed awesome and withstood an incredible pounding. Will post up a story with video in a few days. The Sawtooth with stove was such a comfort in the subfreezing weather and blistering wind. Sets up in less than 5 minutes with the stove.
    "I refuse to let the things I can't do stop me from doing the things I can"
    Founding Member
    http://www.residenthuntersofalaska.org/

  19. #19
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    1,892

    Default

    On the 19th ill be going to montague for 10 days staying in cableas big horn 2 with a 4 dogs stove. i'll report back on how well the tent worked.
    Do I give my friends advice? Jesus, no. They wouldn't take advice from me. Nobody should take advice from me. I haven't got a clue about anything..

  20. #20
    Member AK Troutbum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Chugiak, AK.
    Posts
    1,523

    Default

    I spent two weeks deer hunting on Kodiak in '08 in a 6 man Cabela's Alaska Guide Dome, and although I know that there are better high wind tents out there, this one performed flawlessly. We had a typhoon come through that dumped over 6" of rain, in less than 12 hrs., (this was the same storm that dumped 15" of rain in Cordova) and 80+ mph gusts. We had set the tent up with somewhat of a wind break/hill behind us, so I don't know exactly what we experienced regarding mph winds on the tent, but it blew like hell along with pounding rain and not a drop came into the tent. Someday I may purchase a AO (I would love to have one, but I just can't justify the cost) in the mean time I'll continue to use this tent, and be dry and happy.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •