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Thread: Best Recipe for duck?

  1. #1
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    Default Best Recipe for duck?

    Any of you folks wanna share the best ways to cook ducks and grouse? I've been wrapping the breast in bacon and surrounding them with Apple wedges sprinkled with cinnamon and sugar and baking it covered. Looking for something new.

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    Here you go:
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...reakfast)-.-.-.


    • I like this Recipe for birds both duck and Spruce hen.
      Remove the Breast meat from the Bone.
      Next completly coat it in some white flour that was seasoned with salt and pepper.
      Next dip in a mixture of one egg and a half cup of milk mixed well.
      Then roll in Italian bread crumbs coating completly.
      Fry in oil until golden brown then finnish the bigger breast pieces in a 350* oven for @ 10 minutes. Thinner/smaller pieces are done just from the frying. You can also cut the breast meat into strips and fry only.
      Very much like chicken strips when you are done. Very Delicious.

      Another good bird reciepe I have used lately is to cover the breast(Bone in) with hickory smoked bacon and wrap in Aluminum foil.
      Bake at 350* for 45 minutes Remove the Bacon and enjoy.





    • 1 Day Ago
      #5


      Duck/grouse with fried okra . . .

      Sounds good . . some additional ideas: substitute Panko for the Italian bread crumbs, and accompany the duck/grouse with fried okra. Your recipe sounds a lot like the one I use . . I use an electric wok with a cup of peanut oil for the frying . . run the oil up to 375-degrees. I'd cut the recipe below in half for my wife and me. It's my opinion that this is why God made okra (Freddies carries okra in the frozen veggie case).

      Fried Okra
      Ingredients


      • 6 cups oil, for frying
      • 1/2 cup cornmeal
      • 1 cup all-purpose flour
      • 2 teaspoons House Seasoning, recipe follows
      • 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
      • 2 pounds fresh okra, sliced 1/2-inch thick
      • 1/2 cup buttermilk
      Directions

      Heat oil in a large, heavy-bottomed skillet or Dutch oven to 350 degrees F. (You may not need to use this much oil; do not fill the pan more than halfway up the sides with oil.)
      In a medium bowl, combine cornmeal, flour, House Seasoning, and cayenne pepper. Dip okra in buttermilk and then dredge in cornmeal-flour mixture to coat well. Carefully add okra to the hot oil and cook until golden brown. (It may be necessary to fry the okra in batches.) Remove from oil, drain on paper towels, and then serve immediately.

      House Seasoning:

      1 cup salt
      1/4 cup black pepper

      1/4 cup garlic powder
      Mix ingredients together and store in an airtight container for up to 6 months.


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    Thanks, I'll have to try that. Just got my first Sand Hill last week and was told that it was the prime rib of the sky.

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    My recipe for Brand and Sandhill and Merganzers is the same. Slow Roasting on a charcoal grill. Get your grill nice and hot and cram as much cajun seasoning as you can in the birds. Get a nice cedar board to put birds on. Roast for 6 hours SLOW.... then when done, throw the birds to the dogs and eat the board.

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    My favorite way takes a little more time, but it is delicious and simple. First, you have to pick the bird and leave the skin on, that is the time consuming part. Rub the bird with olive oil and than season with Johnnys and pepper and a touch of garlic powder. Get your grill hot and place the bird breast down for 4 mins or so, flip and repeat. After the initial char put the bird in one of those cheap aluminum baking pan and let it cook for 15 or so until it is done!! Delicious!!

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    Ohhh these are my favorite threads. Duck recipes are always good to hear. I found a new one recently that is very simple.

    Soak the duck breast in water for about 12 hours
    Drain the water
    Marinate duck breast in sesame ginger marinade
    Bake or grill. It's best if you leave it a little pink in the middle.

    Duckdon has a really good one too that he shared a long time ago. It should be in a past post.

    The first time I hunted duck lake, a guys wife shared a good idea with me.

    She plucks the birds and stuffs the body cavity with fruit, then cooks them like a turkey. I have yet to try this, but it sounds really good.
    Some people call it sky busting... I call it optimism
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  7. #7

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    Choose a fat puddler. Pluck then split it up the breastbone. Optional but I like to filet out the ribs and breast bone at this point. Season both skin side and inside with whatever you like. Put in fish smoker with 1/2 to 1 full pan of whatever smoke chips you like.
    I do several birds in a batch.
    After smoking grill over low fire but watch it closely the dripping fat will flare up. Leave it pink.
    Best duck ever.
    I really enjoy the back, thighs, wings etc. If you've never tried it you will not believe what you have been missing.
    Can be frozen and pulled out for midwinter grilling, used in a gumbo etc. Adds a whole new dimension to duck.

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    Bredded and deep fried with some Tony Chachere's on the outside or make up some duck gumbo
    I have such a hard time trying to decide which outdoor activity to do every chance I get!! Living in AK is a mental challenge

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    Quote Originally Posted by ownerstate View Post
    My recipe for Brand and Sandhill and Merganzers is the same. Slow Roasting on a charcoal grill. Get your grill nice and hot and cram as much cajun seasoning as you can in the birds. Get a nice cedar board to put birds on. Roast for 6 hours SLOW.... then when done, throw the birds to the dogs and eat the board.
    I'm guessing you've never actually eaten a crane, then. I can see it for mergansers, maybe for Brant, but Sandhill Crane really is the best tablefare I've ever had.

    If you (or anyone else) doesn't want to eat any cranes they shoot, I'll gladly take the meat!!

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    The last couple days I spent in the blind, I was offered often some duck sticks. I guess they were like peperoni sticks you can buy, but made of duck, by Indian Valley meats. They were very good, no shot in them, and again, very good. Bud
    Wasilla

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    Stuffed with cream cheese and jalapenos, wrapped in bacon and grilled. Serve with wild rice and Alaskan Amber.
    Death is like an old whore in a bar--I'll buy her a drink but I won't go upstairs with her.

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    I believe its all in the preparation, but none the less THAT'S FUNNY!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by ownerstate View Post
    my recipe for brand and sandhill and merganzers is the same. Slow roasting on a charcoal grill. Get your grill nice and hot and cram as much cajun seasoning as you can in the birds. Get a nice cedar board to put birds on. Roast for 6 hours slow.... Then when done, throw the birds to the dogs and eat the board.
    that's funny!!!

  14. #14

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    I think the person that suggested eating your merganser with tartar sauce had it about right.

    Here are my favorites - grandma's roast duck. Pluck the duck (mallard was the staple), stuff with chopped apples and onions, put in a pan with 1/2" water, sprinkle a little mustard seed maybe a little other of favorite spice on it, lay a couple strips of bacon across top to keep skin moist, bake at 350 for one hour, pour all water and juices off, cover duck with sauerkraut, cover pan and bake another hour at 350. I am sure my grandmother cooked several thousand mallards this way over the years, and perhaps it is nostalgia, but it is still my favorite way to eat duck.

    Here is another - ***owee duck - named after a fellow hunter who invented the recipe - we called him the ***owee guide because he was always in a hurry to get to the hunting spot but wouldn't keep track of where he was going, and about halfway he would turn around and ask "where in the ***owee." Breast the duck, soak the breast in Worchester sauce for about 45 minutes. Fire up the grill on HOT. Wrap the boneless half breast in a slice of bacon, pin with a toothpick. Throw on the grill and let the flames roar. Cook until the bacon is in danger of becoming a cinder, about 5 minutes. Breast should still be medium rare. This is for those tasty birds like widgeon.

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    Two important takeaways from a thread like this...
    1. Mergansers are not to be eaten. They may be shot to conserve salmon smolt, but even a cat won't eat one.
    2. Anything up to and including dog turds are good to eat when wrapped in bacon. Except merganser. Even bacon won't take the stink off that stuff.
    Passing up shots on mergansers since 1992.


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    Quote Originally Posted by SkinnyD View Post
    Two important takeaways from a thread like this...
    1. Mergansers are not to be eaten. They may be shot to conserve salmon smolt, but even a cat won't eat one.
    2. Anything up to and including dog turds are good to eat when wrapped in bacon. Except merganser. Even bacon won't take the stink off that stuff.
    LOL yeah I learned the hard way on Merganzers the first year I was here and shot one. NEVER AGAIN.

  17. #17

    Default Peking Duck

    These recipes sound delicious but no one in the world prepares duck as well as the Chinese. Even if you can't try the authentic dish, it's worth trying out a homemade version of 北京烤鸭 or Peking Duck! The key to this dish is the unusual crispy skin, which comes from inflating the duck like a balloon, then dipping and drying it multiple times before roasting it.

    There are tons of recipes out there, I'll give a greatly simplified version here, and this link gives just one example of a more detailed, complex version: http://www.quaypress.com/winefood/de...chen/duck.html There's no end to the complexity, this dish is a LOT of work, but it's quite an incredible experience.

    Choose a nice fat duck. Pluck, then eviscerate through the bung by scraping out all the innards through the backside. Rinse inside and out extremely thoroughly. Rub inside and out with salt, about one tsp/lb of duck. Pat duck dry. (Some cooks stuff whole spices inside the duck at this point.) Use a skewer or toothpicks to seal up the back end tightly. Briefly dip the entire bird into a pot of boiling water.

    With someone's help, hold the bird's neck firmly with a clean air hose (i.e. bicycle pump) shoved between skin and meat, and pump in air while patiently massaging the bird until you release almost all of the skin from the meat. (Warning, a compressed air hose is way too much pressure!) Once the skin is released, tie the neck shut with string and dip the bird in the pot of boiling water again. Glaze entire skin with a mixture of honey and vinegar, then hang to dry in front of a fan. (Chinese cooks leave it to dry for 24 hours, but just use the fan until the skin becomes dry.)

    Roast the dry duck in a moderate oven until it turns a shiny golden brown. (Time and temperature vary, the duck is traditionally hung in a brick oven over a fruitwood fire and adjusted constantly during roasting. Generally takes at least 40 minutes in a hot oven, longer in a moderate one.) The duck is traditionally carved in front of the diners and served in several stages. For home use, slice the duck with a bit of skin with each thin slice of meat. Wrap the pieces in thin steamed Chinese pancakes, with green onions and hoisin sauce. Once all the meat is eaten (or the leftovers sliced off and refrigerated), the remaining duck is either boiled for soup, or chopped up and stir fried with sweet bean sauce. (Nothing is wasted!)

    Again, this is a vast simplification of an incredibly complex dish that everyone should try at least once. I've eaten it in downtown Beijing as a several hour feast, but you can get the experience at a good restaurant in any Chinatown, look for several of these hanging from hooks in the window: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Dr...rs_cropped.jpg Enjoy!

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    Smile See it done . . .

    Quote Originally Posted by Seraphina View Post
    . . Peking Duck! The key to this dish is the unusual crispy skin, which comes from inflating the duck like a balloon, then dipping and drying it multiple times before roasting it.

    . . this dish is a LOT of work, but it's quite an incredible experience.
    Watch the film "Eat Drink Man Woman"* to see this actually done. Don't know whether it would work with wild duck or not . . the Pekin duck, the breed most often used for Peking Duck, is a domestic breed, over 2,000 years old with a much fattier skin than wild duck.

    If anyone tries this with wild duck, please post your results.


    *
    http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/eat_drink_man_woman/

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    Quote Originally Posted by akblackdawg View Post
    The last couple days I spent in the blind, I was offered often some duck sticks. I guess they were like peperoni sticks you can buy, but made of duck, by Indian Valley meats. They were very good, no shot in them, and again, very good. Bud
    I'm saving all of my ducks/geese this year. My first child was born on Sept 20th, so I haven't hunted near as much as I wanted to. If I end up with 20lbs plus, I'm gonna have them make some sausage out of them. If I don't, I'm gonna have it all made into these sticks.

  20. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marcus View Post
    Watch the film "Eat Drink Man Woman"* to see this actually done. Don't know whether it would work with wild duck or not . . the Pekin duck, the breed most often used for Peking Duck, is a domestic breed, over 2,000 years old with a much fattier skin than wild duck.

    If anyone tries this with wild duck, please post your results.



    *
    http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/eat_drink_man_woman/
    I have to believe some wild ducks would be fat enough.

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