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Thread: Please help me I need guidance in buying my husband a duck dog as a present!

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    Default Please help me I need guidance in buying my husband a duck dog as a present!

    I am trying to buy a duck dog for a present for my husband. I don't really know where to start I have searched the internet not knowing what to look for. He said he either wanted a Chesapeake bay retriever or a chocolate lab. I think he is more leaning towards the Chesapeake but I don't want to ask him to many questions because he will know I am up to something. I was wondering if anyone could tell me the pros and cons of both. I have heard that Chesapeake do better in the cold waters up here and they are more of a hardy dog. He has recently been using his buddies lab but this late in the season the dog just shivers I know he is sick of using his friends dogs. I don't really know what to look for when I am trying to find a puppy. Is it important to look at the blood lines to see if there is hunting in them or is it just instinctual? If anyone knows of a breeder for Chesapeake in Alaska please let me know. I do still want to look into labs as well so if anyone know of any lab breeders to I really appreciate any kind of advice anyone can give me! Thanks for your time!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ali View Post
    but I don't want to ask him to many questions because he will know I am up to something.
    Others on this forum can give you much better info on breeds than I can, so I'll leave that to them. All I want to say is think hard about whether it makes more sense for you to pick the dog and surprise him, or whether it might be better to educate yourself, find the local breeders, and then take him shopping to choose one. In my own experience, some presents make good surprises, while others (guns, bows, dogs) are better if fitted to the person. Also, even if you bring him along, you can still surprise him by taking him to the kennel without his expecting it. Just my opinion, good luck.

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    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    +10 seraphina

    Absolutely do NOT surprise someone with the "present" of a dog! No matter how well intentioned, this will nearly always fail to connect the right dog to the right owner. The dog is an intelligent, living creature and should always be given a chance to make a connection with the owner prior to joining the family... and vice versa.

    The better way to go about this would be to do something like research and locate a few breeders with litters that are about ready. Then you might give a "present" of perhaps a new leash and puppy collar with a gift certificate to go pick out the dog he wants at one of the breeders you've already lined up.

    Unlike a shirt of the wrong size or gun of the wrong caliber, you don't just exchange puppies if it doesn't fit. You're making a 15 year committment to a living animal. Liken it more to adopting a new member of the family rather than just buying a new toy.

    Good luck with your research.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

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    Im sorry I should of put this in my message buf I planed on having 2 breeders of both labs and chesapeake so we could go look at them and he could pick one out I just needed help finding out where and what to look for in dogs and breeders. Sorry for the confusion I would never give him a dog and say here is your hunting dog enjoy I understand that he would want to pick out his own dog.

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    You need to look at the bloodlines for a hunting dog. Picking a dog out of the paper is not going to work very well. AKC registration is meaningless when it comes to finding a decent hunting dog.

    You need to look at how well the bloodline hunts or at least performs in hunt tests if the owners are in to that.

    There should be a thread on here about chessy pups from last year when "yukon" was looking for a litter.

    The retriever clubs up here do not promote breeding or breaders, but the members do advertise their litters and most get sold off before being welped.

    AK Dog News

    AK working retriever club

    Midnight Sun Gundog Association

    Retriever Club of AK

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    Member Erik in AK's Avatar
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    You're a good woman!
    If cave men had been trophy hunters the Wooly Mammoth would be alive today

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    Thank you very much.

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    Ali,

    A good place to start is with each breed's parent club & finding out about the breeds. For Labs - http://www.thelabradorclub.com/subpa...y_articles.php and for Chesapeakes - http://amchessieclub.org/ Each club's website has information about the breed's history, purpose, conformation standards, questions to ask breeders, health issues, activities, contact people, etc. I've had Chessies since 1989, but the breed is not right for everyone, that's for sure. Some of us are just more stubborn than any Chesapeake ever was, or just never learn!
    Keep asking questions though -- it's great you asked & didn't just buy a pup from a classified ad! Have to keep this short.

    Karen

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    Chessie's are stubborn -- huh -- i thought mine was the only one-- Truly great dogs though I love mine like one of my kids

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    Thank you for everyone's help I think after a lot of research I think I understand what I am looking for now. Does anyone know of any Chesapeake breeders and Lab breeders in Alaska?

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    I would vote for a female chessie. I had a male years ago but my female was much easier to train.Her name is Ellie

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    Ali, I suggest you go with a lab. There is a reason they dominate most of the retriever field events. You have the best chance of getting a good one if lab, and the best chance of getting a manageable dog to be both a pet and hunter and easy to train. Talk to the breeder, be sure you do not get the alpha male, they have to dominate and you will fight them forever. That is your typical hard headed dog. As far as breeders, call Anchorage sportsmans warehouse, as for Steve, the manager, he breeds 1-2 liters a year and last I heard he has a nice liter sired by a local field champain lab, with all health clearance's. See if they have any of them left, had both blacks and choc that I heard. Bud
    Wasilla

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    Oh boy. This is going to be a popcorn moment.

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    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    I vote for a Golden. They are the most civil tempered of them all.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

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    Quote Originally Posted by JOAT View Post
    I vote for a Golden. They are the most civil tempered of them all.
    Yea, but for a hunting dog, you want a dog that you are 99% sure will be a good retriever. If you get a golden without knowing anything about the line, you have a better chance of getting show dog line dog, which may or may not want to get wet. My wife has a teriffic golden that is every bit as birdy and agressive as a lab, but he if from a field golden line. Same thing with chessies, there are teriffic chessies around with field breeding, but many, many of the local breedings are show dogs, or peope with show dogs that want field breeding but still put looks and conformation ahead of field work when picking a sire for their *****. The important thing other then all the health clearances, look at the pedigree. If lots of FC and AFC you are pretty sure of getting a good field dog. Right Baron Bud
    Wasilla

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    There surely is a big difference. As I have mentioned in other threads .... There is a split between field and show. Especially prevalent in lab lines. Goldens also have this split. Chessies though are the only retriever that to this day can still maintain show qualities and do the field work. Chessie breeders in the future may find an eventual split even in this breed.
    Now an explanation of Field Titles.
    Field Trial titles FC and AFC certainly carry there merits. In most cases though an all FT pedigree is going to be a high powered dog. In most cases the average hunter and average trainer is going to be over dogged. Too much energy and drive for the weekend hunter. Remember these type of retrievers are bred to run 300 to 400 yds and to punch through cover in as straight a line as possible. It takes a well focused high drive dog to be successful.
    Let's not forget about Hunt Test titles as well. HRC, AKC and NAHRA are all producing well trained hunting retrievers. Master Hunters, Hunting Retriever Champions and Master Hunting Retrievers are all top of the line hunt test dogs.
    Personally I prefer a cross between FT and HT.
    No matter what retrievers lines you choose ..... Remember you have a lot of time to live with that dog til the next season. So find a breed and a line that best suites your own individual need. It is best to not buy on impulse. They are all cute. Ask questions and look to see how the parents act while working and how they are when they aren't. Visiting several retriever clubs, visiting breeders and talking with lots of folks that know the breed and the differences will help you in the long run.

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    I just recently got a new Yellow Pointing Lab out of Washington, I did not care for any lines that I was seeing in Alaska, this was just my thought and so far he has been great...

    Here are my suggestions
    1. Research OFFA website on every Sire and Dam you look at, health was my first criteria
    2. Look at Championships and Titles, but how many times going to events did it take to get those titles
    3. A repeat breeding is always nice if not bred often, this gives you a little more idea of what you will get
    4. Temperament of Sire and Dam
    5. Get references and call or email them
    6. Dont look at the cost of puppy to much as that will be the least pricey part over the next 12 years, get the best dog you can

    These were just a few of my recent searching criteria

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    Member 3CBRS's Avatar
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    "Retriever Breeds in Training : Working Traits of the Big Three" - http://oakhillkennel.com/library/breeds.html

    Discussions like this often get rather heated, so might be time to make some popcorn and sit back & watch the fireworks!

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    We owned a Chocolate Lab for 14+ years and he was simply the best "citizen" of society I have ever met! Even tempered, loyal, obedient (yes, we did take him to obedience classes!) and there isn't a day that goes by I don't miss him! He was a great retriever and when my husband was away very protective over me and our children. Most of all he was simply this wonderful friend to our family and gave us many, many years of happiness. Plan on getting another right after we retire and have more time to devote to another family pet.
    Karma is like a rubber band; it can only stretch so far before it comes back and smacks you in the face.

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    I have had Labs all of my life. My 11 year-old is sat at my feet as I type! She is a smaller English Lab, from a great line. But is now a bit old for doing what Kodiak demands. Outstanding dog and also a great family dog, but we have decided to go for something different.
    After a lot of research we have settled on a Small Munsterlander for our next dog. Natural pointers, retrievers and all-round hunting dogs, will retrieve from water or land anything up to the size of fox, but are also outstanding, loyal family members. We already have our deposit down to receive a pup from a great line in July 2012. Yep, a good dog from a good line and you will have to go on a waiting list. These dogs are hard to find, most breeders are hunters, not show dog types. Luckily we found a breeder that has a trip to AK planned for next year and will bring the dog to us.
    Now not wishing to stir the pot, but if you go for a chocolate Lab, be doubly sure of it's line. Chocolates were seen, pre 1970s as a 'non-pure' Lab and were almost erradicated. 1970s they were proven (DNA) to be as pure a Lab as blacks or Yellows. They became fashionable and breeders bred anything that was brown with a Lab to try and 'make' Chocolates (there were so few breadable Chocolate labs around) - so some lines got a bit 'mongrelled' and not all Chocolates are pure Lab.

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