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Thread: Safety and Aviation Etiquette

  1. #1
    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    Default Safety and Aviation Etiquette

    Over the last couple months I have noted a few folks, including myself,,,, slip up and head down the road that the general population seems to be heading. ie. acting as if we have no responsibility for our own actions.

    Sometimes while sitting in the cockpit with our headsets it is easy to forget what is going on outside the aircraft.

    Some things I saw this summer.

    1. A float-plane pilot motoring right up to (and straight at) a dock with five or six small kids swimming and playing around it. All of whom had to dive under the plane or run like heck... Remember that that prop consist of two swords cutting up anything in their paths.

    2. A student pilot pushed his plane out of a shared hangar and then fired it up with the hangar door still open behind him. One of the mechanics working inside ran over to tell him that he was blowing things all over the hangar with his prop-wash. But instead of shutting her down, he fire-walled the engine and taxied straight away. He actually blew tools off the shelf with that one... Now nobody wants to work on his plane.

    3. A Stupper Cub driver decided to display his testosterone level at a fly-in by ground taxing into a group of people in lawn chairs who were watching the take-off and landings. Barely missing another pilots head with his wing-tip as he spun a 180 degree half-ground loop... I am still not sure how he avoided a butt kicking...

    4. And don't even let me get started about the dyslectic guy who passed me during a pattern downwind,,, calling out that he was passing on my left, when he really passed on my right... which I saw just as I was breaking right to avoid whoever the heck it was..

    Anyway, winter is a good time to reflect on safety...

    When approaching a dock, beach or ramp, wait for folks to move away or wave them away... Kids do not understand how dangerous your propeller may be, and adults may mistakenly think you need help.

    The same goes for ground taxi, and nobody will think you have a bigger yahoo than the next guy , just because you managed to spin your tail wheel around and side load your tail spring.

    Prop wash can really mess up the insides of a hangar.

    Passing other planes in the pattern might get you on the ground 60 seconds earlier... So what... So now you are a New York cab driver and not an Alaskan pilot...

    Take your time, think things through and think of others, we pilots have to stick together.
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
    http://site.dragonflyaero.com

  2. #2

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    Excellent post, Float Pilot! Good reminders for us all. A little thought and consideration about others truly goes a long way. Each of us are a representative of the aviation community to the non-flying public. They see one of us do a dumb stunt and they think all pilots are careless and reckless.

    And sometimes when I see a pilot do something dumb, I think "...there but for the grace of God go I..." and I try to be more cognizant of my own actions. Safety first.....but we're human, too.

  3. #3
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    Yeah, Float Pilot - - - - - excellent post! While some of those offending adolescents may have had some sort of school housin', it's cleqr that they've had no "fetchin's up." The sad part is that they'll be among the first to ding an airplane, and then have the temerity to laugh at the repair costs. Goes with the beer, I guess.

    As for the student pilot who blasted away from an open hangar, every mechanic who refuses to work on his airplane should first tell him why. That little bit of education might finally get around to some of the others. Though I doubt it ...................

  4. #4
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    I 'm a student pilot and one of my biggest worrys is doing something dumb or just plain looking dumb .Learning is more important than looking like a fool though!

  5. #5

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    This is why I dont fly when its crowded out. I stay away from fly-ins and crowded areas. I dont even like flying in and out of merril when planes are stacked up on final and the tower is talking like an auctioneer (there is even a controler I have thought of reporting to the FAA because his level of rudeness is over the top, he has made inappropriate comments even though most all of my radio calls are correct, he did not like that I wanted a deviation before I would take off due to cloud base, sorry im the pilot in command and I will determine whats safe cloud base as long as its more conservative than FAA regs). I have found the density of air craft in a specific area is where the most danger is. The things float pilot mentioned are good reminders but the biggest danger of all is having everyone and their brother flying around in the same air space at the same time. Flying in situations like that is also stressful and takes the fun out of flying, I work for a living I dont need to also work when im flying too, having to have eyes in the back of my head because every tom dick and harry are trying to get into a fly in.

  6. #6
    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    Capitalization and the occasional punctuation mark can be friends.
    So you can help your drunken "Uncle Jack", off his horse. Or do what it looks like without capitals and punctuation.
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
    http://site.dragonflyaero.com

  7. #7
    Member faithnhim's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Float Pilot View Post
    Capitalization and the occasional punctuation mark can be friends.
    So you can help your drunken "Uncle Jack", off his horse. Or do what it looks like without capitals and punctuation.
    Guess I must be missing something here? Maybe the mods removed a post. In any case, excellent post! We can all use some reminders from time to time. Thanks for taking the time to share.

  8. #8
    Member ocnfish's Avatar
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    I never try and be the "lead dog" in any avaition situation, always spend enough time on take off and aproaching the pattern to be sure that there "is no confilct" in either situation. In either case I choose to deffer as soon as I see any situation that would result in a conflict (potential accident). I am in no hurry because the act of flying is a reward in it self, besides when I safely firewall the throttle on the "hot rod" big engine earily c-180, I just smile.

    BTW ... different issue but also important ....

    I have ANR headseats to protect my 60 year old ears ... took them off early on my taxi back to the hangar a few weeks ago and discovered a loud tap on every firing cycle of the engine, what could that be? My mechanic and I discovered a flat lifter in #2 cylinder. The cam was OK and the new lifters quieted down right away on a test run.

    Moral of the story, don't forget the engine and listen to it without the masking of ANR headsets ....

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