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Thread: Canoe duck hunting in plamer area

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    Default Canoe duck hunting in plamer area

    I love in Eagle River and I have been duck hunting out at Jim's Lake in Butte with some success. I only have a canoe and wondering if there is any place that is seeing more action that I can get to witha canoe without killing myself to get there? Last weekend we killed 2 reheads and a buffle in 2 days. Yesterday nothing, today killed a mallard. It has to be better then this! I am getting out 1 hour before and staying every day till about 2pm.
    Any suggestions or help is greatly appreciated,

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    Member akblackdawg's Avatar
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    Are you hunting Jim lake or Mud lake. Jim lake is the 2nd one you drive by, mud the first. If hunting Mud, you can easily go back past it in a canoe and hunt the one adjoining it but behind it, can't think of the name right now. Some do paddle down rabbit slough and access the hayflats lakes, but it is a long paddle, I would not do it myself, if you do that, I would go with the tide, go out about a hour or so after the high tide, and stay until the tide chages and come in a hour or so after low tide. Let the tides help. Another option is to go right up rabbit slough and try to jump shoot ducks there. Driving to Portage and using the canoe on all the water there, you can paddle across the ponds/ cross the levi and hit the next one, I hear further back off the highway it can be good, don't try and go up 20 mile. Bud
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    Bud- Thanks for the info. I have been hunting Jim, I pass mud. Never lauched there since motor boats launch there. I may give it a try get out one evnening and set up a blind for the next day. I'll take your advice for paddling Rabit Slough. Behind Jim is Gull but its all grass and with no blind thats my challange. I have no idea how to get to swan lake which is close to Jim!

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    If you are going to paddle Rabbit slough it would be good if you to have another guy to help paddle. It's a long ways, and you will be paddling against the current on the way back. It's a lot of work, but it can pay off. Good luck, hope you get some birds.
    Some people call it sky busting... I call it optimism
    "Swans are a gift" -DucksandDogs
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    I recomend against paddling to duck lake. its a LONG way and not worth it right now. I have never seen it so slow out there as it was this weekend

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    Quote Originally Posted by Phystech View Post
    I have no idea how to get to swan lake which is close to Jim!
    Cross Jim Lake towards the portage on the south bank. In the dark use the farthest east peak as a bearing to get you near. Might not be something you want to do at O'Dark 30.

    Once across the portage go east (left) on McRoberts Creek and you will eventually wind your way to the Y where McRoberts Creek connects to Jim Creek. Jim Creek will be coming from the left (east) with a decent current. From here you can either stuggle to paddle up stream the rest of the day or just go a short distance and climb the south bank to get into the back end of Swan lake. Its really low so you will have to walk a long way to get to some water, but there may be a pocket of water out there in the grass holding birds.

    Along Jim Creek there are several spots to access Swan or Leaf Lakes by climbing over and through the rotten alder bog banks. Its not fun, but can create a fun hunt. There may be a time or two that you think you are going to die knee deep in the muck when one of the adler clumps spins under you and dumps you. There are also obvious spots where the bank is really well worn from all the traffic from the moose hunters.

    If you can handle paddling up the current for a few miles you can make it to the cabin area where the creeks from Leaf and Swan come together and explore that area. If you have any arms left after the two to three mile up hill paddle.

    There are many places in Gull Lake that will hide a 20 foot boat so you can hide your canoe just fine once you are out there. You just have to go look around.

    To get to Gull from Jim take a right (west) from the portage and then take your first left. This is one of the two routes McRoberts Creek takes into the Gull/Mud Lake area. This will get you into the grass flat behind the blinds on the "beaver dam" that separates the lakes. If you take the right you will end up in Mud Lake.

    A note of caution about being in a canoe in the creek in the dark. The three or four mud motor boats that hunt Swan lake will come up on you fast. You can hear them from miles away so as they get close get to the side of the creek in the alders and hold on. Make sure you have lights on your canoe. Some mud boats don't have much for head lights on them and they won't see you until they are right on you.

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    Member kwackkillncrew's Avatar
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    shot red heads ehh. didnt think we had them up here
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    Member akblackdawg's Avatar
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    I know some will argue, but redheads and cans are exactly the same other then size and are often mis identifieds. redheads about the size of a scaup, cans are larger but still a bit smaller then a mallard, other then that, identical, only about 2 inchs seperates the 2. I remember that because we had to identify one in my ornothalogy lab exam and I identified a can as a redhead, or maybe it was the other way around, but that was 40 years ago. Bud
    Wasilla

  9. #9

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    No thats not at all true. redheads in eclipse get miss ID as bluebills and ringnecks. most often ringnecks since they have a ring on the bill. as you can see the head shape between cans and redheads is very different and easy to tell apart even in eclipse
    images[1].jpgimages[2].jpg

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    Member AK Ray's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Griffin4590 View Post
    No thats not at all true. redheads in eclipse get miss ID as bluebills and ringnecks. most often ringnecks since they have a ring on the bill. as you can see the head shape between cans and redheads is very different and easy to tell apart even in eclipse
    And there is the fact that one has a blue bill and the other black tends to help easily sort things out.

    The only redheads I have ever seen out on Jims Lake are of the sawbill variety.

  11. #11
    Member kwackkillncrew's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Griffin4590 View Post
    No thats not at all true. redheads in eclipse get miss ID as bluebills and ringnecks. most often ringnecks since they have a ring on the bill. as you can see the head shape between cans and redheads is very different and easy to tell apart even in eclipse
    images[1].jpgimages[2].jpg
    thats what i am saying they are easily distinguishable between a redhead and a can even in eclipse. not only the head but the bill is a easy indicator also.
    I will never be a "Prostaffer" its not that I am not good enough
    but its because I refuse to pimp products for free.

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    Just for the skeptics, here some facts about redhead breeding. I took female. I know the diff between a Redhead, Canvas Back and a sawbill. Breeding and Nesting

    Redheads breed in the summer in central Alaska, the Great Plains and throughout the west. They take new mates each year and start to pair off in the winter.

  13. #13

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    never said you didn't kill one man

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