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Thread: condensation problem with inflatable air mattress...

  1. #1
    Member mossyhorn's Avatar
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    Default condensation problem with inflatable air mattress...

    When camping on the road system, my wife and I take a large tent and a coleman air mattress. For some reason, I can't understand, the matress condensates horribly, leaving the underside of our sleeping bags damp or even wet. Yet there is no water underneath the mattress or on the tent floor. How can this be prevented?

  2. #2
    Member Kotton's Avatar
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    Are using a pump?if your not maybe it's the moisture from your lungs?Should have went synthetic!!!LOL!!

  3. #3
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Kotton is likely on the right track. If you fill with hot air the mattress is likely to hit the dew point causing condensation. Even some pumps will get warm and heat the air but usually not as much as blowing them up by mouth.

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    Member mossyhorn's Avatar
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    Using a pump

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    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    You need better venting in your tent. Is the inside of the tent also wet? If so, that's your issue. Moisture from your breathing and your body has to condensate on something. It won't condensate on a smaller air mattress because your body can keep it warm. This doesn't happen on a big mattress like the Colemans. Our family also uses them while car camping and with one poorly vented tent they condensate, but on the better ventilated tent they don't.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

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    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    Are you using propane heat?
    I don't mean to sound bitter, cold, or cruel, but I am, so that's how it comes out.
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  7. #7

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    I agree with Doug, ventilate. Lung moisture only condensates inside the mattress, your condensation is outside the mattress, which means it's coming from the temperature differential between cold mattress and warm sleeping bag. One solution is to throw on a thin mattress topper, to insulate your sleeping bags from the cold mattress. No need to buy anything, whatever you already have for backpacking or for bedroom will probably work fine.

  8. #8
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    Condensation forms on cool surfaces. In this case warm air from your body probably cools around your perimeter and moisture settles on the mattress and in your bedding where air movement is restricted. I'd try using a polar fleece blanket or something similar as a mattress pad.

    When I'm in a sleeping bag I expect to find some moisture on the bag in the morning. Sleeping bags with colder temp ratings diminish the problem but in that case I'll keep some of the bag unzipped so I don't overheat and that vents my body heat in a direct way. The improved insulation beneath me solves the condensation problem on the sleeping pad. I always prefer my sleeping bags to be over rated for the temps I'll sleep in. That may benefit you as well. If you're using a light-ish bag and adding a top blanket you may be creating your problem.

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