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Thread: Ice house heat

  1. #1
    Moderator AKmud's Avatar
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    Default Ice house heat

    For you guys that do extended trips in your shanties.... What do you do for safe heat overnight? I have a radiant propane heater, but even on it's lowest setting it will cook me out of the shack. I am trying to find something in the 8-10k btu range, direct vent, that is able to be run on a thermostat without a major power supply. I found one by House Warmer but it is nearly $400.

    Any killer ideas to keep the shack comfortable overnight without having to manually turn it on/off every 30-40 minutes?

    My shack is 8'x10' with a 6'6" ceiling and is insulated with 1" foam.
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    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    I am working on a small hard side. I want to avoid propane as it stops at -40 and wood as it takes up too much room. Looking for a small Deville style heater for it. My buddy heats a cabin for the weekend on 2.5 gallons of diesel. No smell, no battery. Works in the cold.
    I don't mean to sound bitter, cold, or cruel, but I am, so that's how it comes out.
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    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    what is a deville heater? do you have links? I was thinking of a new heater but will probably go for a better woodstove than what I ran last season. I'd still be interested in something that works well because it does hit 40 below or colder, and propane isn't the greatest.

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    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mainer_in_ak View Post
    what is a deville heater? do you have links? I was thinking of a new heater but will probably go for a better woodstove than what I ran last season. I'd still be interested in something that works well because it does hit 40 below or colder, and propane isn't the greatest.
    I would assume this.....

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    Moderator AKmud's Avatar
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    The Deville looks interesting but it is pretty big. 220#s would add a lot of weight to the setup and 39,000 btu is a little overkill for a 8x10 area. Do they make a smaller unit? I didn't see any options when I checked out the site.
    AKmud
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    Member power drifter's Avatar
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    Not real cheap, but I'd look into diesel boat heaters like Espar or Dickinson Sig. Here is a link
    http://www.boatownersworld.com/heaters.htm

  7. #7
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Why not use a vented propane stove??? Could you not just keep the propane tank in the ice house?? I use one in my tent and run it all night. We get 4 to 6 nights on a 5 gallon tank depending on use, but I do let it run on low all night.





    http://www.nuwaystove.com/model2000.php
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    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    I need to find the model that is only 18000 BTU. It isn't as heavy and only takes a couple square feet of wall space.
    I don't mean to sound bitter, cold, or cruel, but I am, so that's how it comes out.
    Bill Hicks

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    Moderator AKmud's Avatar
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    Anyone ever used a drip oil type stove like a Toyo or similar? It wouldn't be hard to fasten a 5-10 gallon tank to the outside of the house for gravity feed. My main hiccup here is being able to use a thermostat without having power.
    AKmud
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    The porcupine is a peacful animal yet God still thought it necessary to give him quills....

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    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    I can't find a link to it but there is an 18000 BTU Deville out there that uses under 2 1/2 gallons a weekend at the lake. No electricity. Light it with a QTip. No thermostat, but is adjustable.

    If you have ever been to the repair station near Big Lake.... you might think twice about Toyo. They have a hundred in for repair. They also require electricity.
    I don't mean to sound bitter, cold, or cruel, but I am, so that's how it comes out.
    Bill Hicks

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    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    I'm worried about that too, regarding Toyo stoves. I just purchased a new one as people warned me to not buy one used. I was also told to make sure to use a quality in line filter/separator. I was also instructed to only use the highest quality heating oil instead of the other stuff and it will run well. I read the directions thoroughly and I'm hoping this set-up will run my shop reliably. If not, I did fill out the warranty card.

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    Member akriverunner's Avatar
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    toyos work great but they do take power to run, i have been using mine for 5 years now at my cabin primarily on the weekends.

  13. #13

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    We run esty heaters in our shack(I think thats the name) they were about 800 i beleive the smaller one is 9000 btus and is about 500 they have a thermostat and require no power at all they are direct vent we have had zero problems even at -40 with our propane BUT we always have a spare regulator and we "drain" the regulator when were done to prevent freeze-up and I always bring the new tank of propane in with me EVERYTIME hence I believe the "no problems" A little extra work but it all ways fires up and runs flawlessly.

  14. #14
    Member akjeff's Avatar
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    Rob,
    Use a Millivolt thermostat. Requires no electricity or batteries. Produces its own power with a thermocouple. We run our gas fireplace with one. Power outages are no worries. I believe I purchased ours from AK Fireplace and Accessories.

    http://homerepair.about.com/od/heati...urn_coor_2.htm

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    Anyone try one of these? I plan on doing alot of pickup camping this winter and i thought this would work good for warming up my capmer shell while drying out or getting ready to hear out, also might work for tent camping... what do you guys think maybe and ice shanty as well?

  16. #16
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    I have a pioneer trekker diesel heater for sale. If you guys are interested in it pm me.

    http://pioneerspaceheaters.com/trekker.html

  17. #17
    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    that trekker heater looks about perfect. Diesel fuel produce so many more btu's per gallon as opposed to propane. I bet there wouldn't be a single cold spell that would stop that heater from working. I was very impressed with the 8 hour run time on a half gallon of fuel. 4,000 btu's at that low setting is perfect for an insulated ice house. As long as my shack is around 50- 60 degrees at night......perfect. I might have to take a look at your heater if you don't mind.

  18. #18
    Member akjw7's Avatar
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    I have a vented catalytic propane heater - it does require 12v power, but I need that for my lights and tunes as well (12v fluorescent from ebay). Works great when things get warmed up, but from a cold soak it needs something else to get it up to temp. Sunflower type heater does that. I'd probably go with an empire propane direct vent if I had to buy one - more power than the cat type. That nuway stove looks cool too.

  19. #19
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    I use a small propane tank (5 gl.) that I modified into a wood stove. Lasts in my hut (8x8) 4 to 5 hours. It puts out lots of heat so I keep the door open most of the time. But I do like cheap heat.

  20. #20
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    I just pulled my 8X14 with 8ft ceiling sloping to 7ft ceiling out to Lake Louise in -40 temps. We used a propane flower attached to a propane tank. Not the safest but kept the window cracked open and didn't have a door knob on the door so plenty of fresh air. Wife is really concerned about CO2 poisoning so we have a battery operated CO2 monitor and are planning on purchasing this unit. Central Plumbing and heating sells them for $600, but you can find them on ebay for $400 plus shipping. They are direct vent which means they take air from the outside and vent to the outside so no danger of CO2 poisoning and you can safely shut your windows and doors. My shack is R13 insulated floor, walls, and ceiling with vapor barrier so I can make it pretty tight hence the reason we are going to go with direct vent. Propane heaters in a shack/cabin where snow and ice are introduced can cause a lot of moisture to be stored in the wood and on the vapor barrier, but this is the most economical and portable system I've found. One idea is to have the DV8 pull air from inside the shack and vent/exhaust to the outside. The theory being that it will pull the moist air from inside the shack (breathing, clothes and boots thawing) and vent it outside while still producing heat. If you do that then you do need to keep a window cracked so that you have a good supply of fresh air and use a CO2 monitor. There is still the problem of propane not working correctly at -40. Central Plumbing and heating said that if you bring a fresh tank with you every trip and insulate it it would work better than just leaving the tank outside over long periods of time getting extremely cold and not being used.

    http://www.rural-energy.com/catalog/...php?pro_id=288
    Last edited by 1S1K; 01-11-2012 at 10:52. Reason: add link

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