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Thread: T/C Contender question

  1. #1
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    Default T/C Contender question

    Im in the market for a contender, carbine for my daughter. The more I learn, the dummer I get on these guns. What is the difference between a contender, a G2 and a encore? Im trying to get one, but I dont know enough about them to know even what to ask. I guess there is more to them than just a small single shot rifle. Can I get a stock for an encore? what barrels fit, what interchanges with what? I am looking for a 7-30 waters or a 35 whelen in a rifle not a pistol. can I get that in a contender or some other model. I guess B4 I trade my rifle away Id better know what Im looking at. Thanks

    I have been to the site, I just need some experienced opinion.

  2. #2
    Member Kay9Cop's Avatar
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    A Condender is the old style light weight pistol. It's limited to cartridges smaller/less pressure than .308 Winchester. The G2 is the updated version of the Contender. It's also limited in cartridge selection. If you want light weight, the G2 is the one to get. The Encore is the big boy and can be had in any caliber from .17 to 50 but is limited by case head size on some of the biggest .50's and pressure on some of the RUM's. 7-30 is no problem for Contender/G2. But, if you want a .35 Whelen (unless I'm mistaken) you'll have to go to the Encore.

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    Default encore

    OK then, can I put a stock on a encore pistol just by taking off the rubber pistol grip and then buy me a stock at sportsmans WH and bolt it right on making it a carbine??? Ive looked at the T/C site and cant tell for sure.

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    Member Rick P's Avatar
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    Your on the right track Jim the G2 the contender and the encore can all be switched over to a carbine by switching stocks. I've owned a contender for about 20 years now and wish I had the Encore. The diferance in weight is minimal and the skys the limit on calibers for the Encore. All three of these firearms are tack drivers!!! Ive taken white tail at 195 yards with the pistol version of the Contender and smoked varmits form a feild bench at simular distances! My Contnder is definatly the most acurate gun I own and I'm really looking forward to the added flexability the Encore will give me. These are factory guns that preform like a expensive single shot custom made gun.

    Great northern guns has new Encore frames set up with the carbine stock for $395.00 add whatever barrel you want and off ya go.
    Last edited by Rick P; 03-23-2007 at 01:19. Reason: Added info

  5. #5
    Member AKRoadkill's Avatar
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    You can make a contender or Encore pistol into a carbine or rifle by swapping barrels, stocks and foreends. However, it's illegal to convert a frame originally purchased as a rifle/carbine to pistol configuration. And It's illegal to use the rifle/carbine stock with a pistol barrel, or a handgun grip with a rifle barrel...somehow, any of those modifications turns that single-shot into an "assault weapon".

    To my understanding, if you start with a pistol frame, you can switch back and forth. There's no difference in the Rifle/Carbine and pistol frames...just depends on what configuration it was originally sold as.

    I'd go with the Encore in 7mm-08 for your purposes.

    Mine's a 7mm-08 pistol, with the barrel and stock to make it a .243 rifle.

    This is where I got mine a few years back. Can't remember the guy's name, but he sure knows his T/Cs:
    http://www.contendercache.com/

  6. #6

    Default Assault Weapon, NOT!

    Actually, it's a matter of overall length. A carbine/rifle has to have an overall length of 26 inches with a barrel length of 16 or 16 1/2 inches to be a legal firearm. A pistol. of course doesn't have those restrictions, until you put the buttstock on.

  7. #7
    Member Kay9Cop's Avatar
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    There is a lot of discussion on the net about converting a T/C from rifle to pistol and back again. T/C had to sue the ATF to make it legal for T/C to produce certain firearms and barrels. I won't go into all of the legal intricacies because I'm not a lawyer but, T/C one. However, the way the written law still reads, it is as AKRoadKill mentioned. However, there is case law that says it's ok to convert back and forth based on T/C assertion that it's not so much a rifle or pistol as it is a kit designed to do both. To be safe, just purchase a pistol first and add the stock, forearm, and rifle barrel.

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    Default Have you considered the TCR?

    The TCR is not in production any more but there are still some available. I have one with barrels that include 22-250, 243, 30-06, and 35 Whelen. I have shot a couple of moose with the 35 Whelen and I am very impressed with the results. If you have any questions about this email me. Also, if you are in the market for one I haven't used mine for a long time and I would consider selling it.

    Jack

  9. #9

    Default Contender

    The replacement of a pistol grip on a single shot pistol with a rifle stock, makes the firearm become a Federaly restricted firearm called an AOW (Any Other Weapon). The same firearm with a 16 1/2 inch or longer barrel, installed becomes a legal carbine. If you remove the rifle stock and replace it with a pistol grip you now have a Legal long barreld pistol.
    The contender is the lightest and was Thompson Center Arms first sucess story it is capable of using a variety of rounds and a lot of different barrels are available. Some were after market barrels by SSK. Bullberry and others. They were available in a lot of calibers from 22 lr to 45-90. The contender is the lower pressure frame of the bunch and should br kept down to around 30-30 pressures. the new Encore is the Contenders big brother being both heavier and bulkier it is capable of using modern high pressure cartridges such as 300 WM.
    " Americans will never need the 2nd Amendment, until the government tries to take it away."

    On the road of life..... Pot holes keep things interesting !

  10. #10

    Default Contenders

    I started shooting Contenders about 35 years ago. Since then, to the best of my recollection, I've owned 22LR, 22 MAG,222 Rem,7/30 Waters, 30-30, 30 Herett, 35 rem, 30-40 Ackely Improved, 375 JDJ, 44 mag, 45/410...and shot at least another 15 cartridges in TCs.Including full house 45-70s with maxed 500 grainers at 1450 chroned...the ultimate in recoil.

    Doesn't make me the world's leading expert on TCs...but gives me the right to an opinion.

    After trying about every option, both carbine and handgun, that you could conjure up...including several barrels from SSK and the TC Custom shop, here are my thoughts:

    1.If you want to light weight in a "rifle", there are better options.Just for starters, the model 7 SS, maybe a Ruger, or for sure the Kimber 84M in a 308 based parent round.I really didn't want to admit this until after spending several grand dicking with TCs, but it's true.

    As is commonly known, the TC or G2 is not a high pressure/high intensity action. So loading catridges above 45,000 PSI or CUP invites having the action blow open (with a 308 derivative or even 30-30 derivative) every time you drop a cap. Sorry, I don't make up the rules...but that THOUGHT enters your mind everytime you pull the trigger.It wouldn't take many embedded cases in your forehead...or eyes...to convince you that this is not a winning proposition.

    My last go was a 7/30 with a custom shop 21" stainless barrel...honed TC action...Rynalite stock and forearm...and a 2X7 Leupold VariXX Silver up top.Handloads ran right around 2400 with various 120 or 130 bullets.Carry weight was about 5.3lbs scoped...just a sweet heart for field carry at around 36.5".

    But at the end of the day, this rig kicked about like a metal butt plate 30-30...not much, but enough to be almost obnoxious...it was EXTREMELY sensitive to forearm pressure as to zero and accuracy...and, as mentioned, I wondered every shot if I was going to swallow a 7/30 case on blowback and blow open.

    So I sold it...also sold my 375 JDJ which was the most accurate "handgun" I've ever owned...and all the rest of my TC stuff.

    I can honestly say that TC makes a good product if you want to live with their design and engineering options...but Warren Center never intended his design...much modified, but essentially the same from around 1967...to handle the demands it's subject to today.

    Similar to Smith's N frames in today's high performance cartridges.

    There are so many options today with high strength bolt guns that weigh around the same as a TC carbine that, for me, the question is a no brainer.

    Just my opinion, based on hell cat 44/357s from the early 70s with wood stocks to the present.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by mauserboy View Post
    Actually, it's a matter of overall length. A carbine/rifle has to have an overall length of 26 inches with a barrel length of 16 or 16 1/2 inches to be a legal firearm. A pistol. of course doesn't have those restrictions, until you put the buttstock on.

    Actually that's wrong. All and I mean all T/C framesnow days are either made as a pistol or a rifle. They are registered as such straight from the factory. You can make a pistol frame into a rifle but don't even get caught making a rifle frame into a pistol. If you have the intention of ever wanting a T/C pistol, buy the pistol frame and that way you can convert it into a rifle.

  12. #12
    Member L. G.'s Avatar
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    Default Contender Resurrection.

    Quote Originally Posted by 7STW View Post
    I started shooting Contenders about 35 years ago. Since then, to the best of my recollection, I've owned 22LR, 22 MAG,222 Rem,7/30 Waters, 30-30, 30 Herett, 35 rem, 30-40 Ackely Improved, 375 JDJ, 44 mag, 45/410...and shot at least another 15 cartridges in TCs.Including full house 45-70s with maxed 500 grainers at 1450 chroned...the ultimate in recoil.

    Doesn't make me the world's leading expert on TCs...but gives me the right to an opinion.

    After trying about every option, both carbine and handgun, that you could conjure up...including several barrels from SSK and the TC Custom shop, here are my thoughts:

    1.If you want to light weight in a "rifle", there are better options.Just for starters, the model 7 SS, maybe a Ruger, or for sure the Kimber 84M in a 308 based parent round.I really didn't want to admit this until after spending several grand dicking with TCs, but it's true.

    As is commonly known, the TC or G2 is not a high pressure/high intensity action. So loading catridges above 45,000 PSI or CUP invites having the action blow open (with a 308 derivative or even 30-30 derivative) every time you drop a cap. Sorry, I don't make up the rules...but that THOUGHT enters your mind everytime you pull the trigger.It wouldn't take many embedded cases in your forehead...or eyes...to convince you that this is not a winning proposition.

    My last go was a 7/30 with a custom shop 21" stainless barrel...honed TC action...Rynalite stock and forearm...and a 2X7 Leupold VariXX Silver up top.Handloads ran right around 2400 with various 120 or 130 bullets.Carry weight was about 5.3lbs scoped...just a sweet heart for field carry at around 36.5".

    But at the end of the day, this rig kicked about like a metal butt plate 30-30...not much, but enough to be almost obnoxious...it was EXTREMELY sensitive to forearm pressure as to zero and accuracy...and, as mentioned, I wondered every shot if I was going to swallow a 7/30 case on blowback and blow open.

    So I sold it...also sold my 375 JDJ which was the most accurate "handgun" I've ever owned...and all the rest of my TC stuff.

    I can honestly say that TC makes a good product if you want to live with their design and engineering options...but Warren Center never intended his design...much modified, but essentially the same from around 1967...to handle the demands it's subject to today.

    Similar to Smith's N frames in today's high performance cartridges.

    There are so many options today with high strength bolt guns that weigh around the same as a TC carbine that, for me, the question is a no brainer.

    Just my opinion, based on hell cat 44/357s from the early 70s with wood stocks to the present.
    Just wanted to say that I'll really diggin my T/C Carbine setup. This is a G1 frame with a .30-30 custom shop tube cyt at 20". With scope, mine weighs 5.5#. Don't think you can get a Remmy 7 to do that. Extremly accurate with 130 TSXs and Rem factory 150 RNs. Thinking about trying Speer 170 gr Deep Curl next year. Just a joy to carry all day.




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