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Thread: Recipes: What are you having for dinner (or lunch or breakfast) . . .

  1. #1
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    Smile Recipes: What are you having for dinner (or lunch or breakfast) . . .

    Since I cook the majority of suppers at our house, I'm always on the lookout for new recipes, and the "What are you having . ." thread is frustrating in that regard . . too many good-looking dishes without recipes. Hopefully, this thread will be for "What we're eating" with recipes for the same.

    Here's a start: Salmon Tacos

    Skin salmon, bone, and cut into strips
    Season with whatever winds your clock—Cajun, lemon pepper, dill, etc.
    Saute briefly in oil
    Serve on flour or corn tacos and top with finely shredded, raw cabbage, mayo, and sweet relish

    Very simple, very quick, and fairly balanced . . . and very good!

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    Default Re: Salmon Taco Recipe

    You must spread some Reputation around before giving it to Marcus again.
    Simple, basic, very nice, and I'm betting quite yummy. I need to try that; I usually over-complicate my recipes. Thanks!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marcus View Post
    Here's a start: Salmon Skin salmon, bone, and cut into strips
    Season Saute briefly in oil
    Serve
    Very simple, very quick, and fairly balanced . . . and very good!
    Now thats how to cook up fine Alaskan salmon
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    I like this Recipe for birds both duck and Spruce hen.
    Remove the Breast meat from the Bone.
    Next completly coat it in some white flour that was seasoned with salt and pepper.
    Next dip in a mixture of one egg and a half cup of milk mixed well.
    Then roll in Italian bread crumbs coating completly.
    Fry in oil until golden brown then finnish the bigger breast pieces in a 350* oven for @ 10 minutes. Thinner/smaller pieces are done just from the frying. You can also cut the breast meat into strips and fry only.
    Very much like chicken strips when you are done. Very Delicious.

    Another good bird reciepe I have used lately is to cover the breast(Bone in) with hickory smoked bacon and wrap in Aluminum foil.
    Bake at 350* for 45 minutes Remove the Bacon and enjoy.
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    Default Duck/grouse with fried okra . . .

    kailofchrisn:

    Sounds good . . some additional ideas: substitute Panko for the Italian bread crumbs, and accompany the duck/grouse with fried okra. Your recipe sounds a lot like the one I use . . I use an electric wok with a cup of peanut oil for the frying . . run the oil up to 375-degrees. I'd cut the recipe below in half for my wife and me. It's my opinion that this is why God made okra (Freddies carries okra in the frozen veggie case).


    Fried Okra
    Ingredients


    • 6 cups oil, for frying
    • 1/2 cup cornmeal
    • 1 cup all-purpose flour
    • 2 teaspoons House Seasoning, recipe follows
    • 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
    • 2 pounds fresh okra, sliced 1/2-inch thick
    • 1/2 cup buttermilk
    Directions

    Heat oil in a large, heavy-bottomed skillet or Dutch oven to 350 degrees F. (You may not need to use this much oil; do not fill the pan more than halfway up the sides with oil.)
    In a medium bowl, combine cornmeal, flour, House Seasoning, and cayenne pepper. Dip okra in buttermilk and then dredge in cornmeal-flour mixture to coat well. Carefully add okra to the hot oil and cook until golden brown. (It may be necessary to fry the okra in batches.) Remove from oil, drain on paper towels, and then serve immediately.

    House Seasoning:

    1 cup salt
    1/4 cup black pepper

    1/4 cup garlic powder
    Mix ingredients together and store in an airtight container for up to 6 months.

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    Potato, onion, and pumpkin soup

    Serves 8

    2 lbs potato
    2 large onions or leeks
    3 cups pumpkin or winter squash
    2 tbsp butter
    1 cup cream
    salt, pepper, and garlic to taste

    quarter the onion and slice, then sauté till translucent in the butter. add potato and pumpkin and fill the pot to almost the top of the ingredients. cook till the potatoes are soft and then puree. Add the cream and serve hot or cold with sour cream.

    A good bread makes this dish even better.
    It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

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    Thumbs up Salmon caviar . . .

    Quote Originally Posted by JOAT View Post
    . . Hey, I do have a good preparation method and recipe for ikura if anyone's interested.
    Joat, the few times I've made salmon roe have left me with the impression that the larger, more mature roe is much more "fishy" than smaller roe. Is that indeed the case in your experience? Consequently, I'm partial to very small roe . . the size of BB's or thereabouts.

    Also—and I've yet to try this—European Peasant Cookery's recipe calls for:

    8 oz. roe
    1 tbsp salt
    1 tbsp seed oil
    1/2 tbsp aqvavit or vodka

    The roe is salted while still in the skein-overnight in the fridge; split the membrane and empty roe into a bowl; sprinkle on the alcohol followed by the oil

    Serve w/rye bread, unsalted butter, pepper, w/chopped onion on the side. This is a recipe from Finland and Scandinavia . . ever heard of or tried it?

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    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    Nope, never heard of it. I have pretty limited experience with roe & ikura, so I can't say I've noticed a difference between egg sizes. The Russians collect them plump at the end of season and I've not noticed much of a "fishy" flavor about it. More experimentation on my part may be required.
    Winter is Coming...

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    Post Recipe for breadmachine wheat bread

    This was derived from a Sally Lunn recipe; you'll notice the similarities; only we wanted to use freshly ground red wheat, so we had to make a few adjustments to the SL.

    This makes a 2 pound loaf with light crust color using the "basic" bread machine program.

    - 2/3 stick butter
    - break 2 eggs into the measuring cup, then add water to fill it up to 1 1/3 cups total
    - 1 1/2 tsp salt
    - 2 Tblsp sugar
    - 2 cups white flour
    - 2 cups freshly (coarse) ground red wheat flour
    - 1 Tblsp yeast, plus a smidge more

    I make a loaf of this almost every day. I add those ingredients to the bread machine (in that order) every evening, and program it to have it done at the proper time the next morning.

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    Moderator kingfisherktn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FamilyMan View Post
    This was derived from a Sally Lunn recipe; you'll notice the similarities; only we wanted to use freshly ground red wheat, so we had to make a few adjustments to the SL.

    This makes a 2 pound loaf with light crust color using the "basic" bread machine program.

    - 2/3 stick butter
    - break 2 eggs into the measuring cup, then add water to fill it up to 1 1/3 cups total
    - 1 1/2 tsp salt
    - 2 Tblsp sugar
    - 2 cups white flour
    - 2 cups freshly (coarse) ground red wheat flour
    - 1 Tblsp yeast, plus a smidge more

    I make a loaf of this almost every day. I add those ingredients to the bread machine (in that order) every evening, and program it to have it done at the proper time the next morning.
    If you are eating a loaf of that every day you are going to have a "broad" view of everything in short order.

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    Question Bread . . .

    Quote Originally Posted by FamilyMan View Post
    This was derived from a Sally Lunn recipe; you'll notice the similarities; only we wanted to use freshly ground red wheat, so we had to make a few adjustments to the SL.

    This makes a 2 pound loaf with light crust color using the "basic" bread machine program.

    - 2/3 stick butter
    - break 2 eggs into the measuring cup, then add water to fill it up to 1 1/3 cups total
    - 1 1/2 tsp salt
    - 2 Tblsp sugar
    - 2 cups white flour
    - 2 cups freshly (coarse) ground red wheat flour
    - 1 Tblsp yeast, plus a smidge more

    I make a loaf of this almost every day. I add those ingredients to the bread machine (in that order) every evening, and program it to have it done at the proper time the next morning.
    FamilyMan, what are you using to grind your wheat? I use a L'equip Nutrimill to grind, a Bosch to knead the dough, and bake in the oven. Another question, do you get a good rise with your recipe above?

    I'm going to try your recipe using Jim Lahey's "slow rise" method: same recipe except that the yeast is cut to 1/2 teaspoon and the dough left to rise 12 to 18 hours. The difference in texture is amazing—much more elastic, much airier. Also will likely substitute olive oil for all or part of the butter. Will let you know how it comes out.

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    last night we decided to use one of our camp supper recipes for a great dinner.....we take chopped potatoes, onions, brocoli, cauliflower, carrots, sausages, and seasoned chicken, season it all, and then throw in a dose of poppyseed or italian dressing, or whatever is on hand, wrap it all up in tinfoil and bake it in the oven for 20 minutes or so, and have a hawaiian sweet roll on the side.....easy to make great meal and its comes out awesome every time, especially in camp!

    The other night i made some burgers that turned out to be some of the best i ever made....first I made up a batch of my own honey bbq sauce (i usually make it for basting my homemade moose jerky), took one pound of maple flavored ground sausage, and 2lbs of moose burger, and mixed it up together using about 15% sausage and 85% moose, mixing the bbq sauce into the patties, then topped it off with pepperjack cheese and onion hamburger buns....served them to some friends with alaskan oatmeal stout beer, it was very much enjoyed....



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    Default Nutrimill and olive oil

    Quote Originally Posted by Marcus View Post
    FamilyMan, what are you using to grind your wheat? I use a L'equip Nutrimill to grind, a Bosch to knead the dough, and bake in the oven. Another question, do you get a good rise with your recipe above?

    I'm going to try your recipe using Jim Lahey's "slow rise" method: same recipe except that the yeast is cut to 1/2 teaspoon and the dough left to rise 12 to 18 hours. The difference in texture is amazing—much more elastic, much airier. Also will likely substitute olive oil for all or part of the butter. Will let you know how it comes out.
    Nutrimill here too. Don't know the model number - I bought it used. Two controls on the front:
    high/low
    fine/coarse

    I always use high and coarse.

    I do get a good rise, yes. While I prefer to use exact measurements in my bread machine, I had to add just a skosh beyond 1 tbsp to get that good rise. My tablespoon measure is heaped up though less than an eighth inch too-high, if you're wondering what I call a skosh or a smidge.

    My bread machine makes it in 3 hours from start. I spend less than 5 minutes of my time, including grinding the wheat. The salt and yeast amounts seem to be the two variables than can make or break the rise, in my setup.

    I like the idea of olive oil and might steal that from you. Do you do a 1 to 1 substitution?

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    Quote Originally Posted by FamilyMan View Post
    . . The salt and yeast amounts seem to be the two variables than can make or break the rise, in my setup.

    I like the idea of olive oil and might steal that from you. Do you do a 1 to 1 substitution?
    I wouldn't think salt can effect your rise since salt is added to bread mostly for flavor (Donna German, author of The Bread Machine Cookbook, says salt can inhibit yeast growth). Yeast is another matter—the more yeast, the faster the rise.

    About the olive oil: two-thirds a stick of butter is what, about six tablespoons? In my baking, I've never used more that one or two tablespoons of fat (olive oil, butter, almond oil, vegetable oil, etc.) for the quantity (four cups) of flour your recipe calls for. I'd suggest going half-and-half first if you're going to try substituting olive oil for your butter—if it works and you like the flavor, then go whole hog. Keep in mind too that if you're using salted butter you may want to up your salt, and since butter can contain as much as 15 percent water, substituting olive oil could maybe affect the consistency of your dough.

    If you try it, let us know the results.

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    Default balance salt vs. yeast

    Quote Originally Posted by Marcus View Post
    I wouldn't think salt can effect your rise since salt is added to bread mostly for flavor (Donna German, author of The Bread Machine Cookbook, says salt can inhibit yeast growth). Yeast is another matter—the more yeast, the faster the rise.
    When I strayed from printed recipes (which I do most of the time), I've definitely found that adding more salt inhibits yeast, or at least inhibits the rise. Re Yeast, I've found that more yeast is more rise.... until a certain point, when it rose too much and fell.

    Note that 100 percent of my breadmaking experience is via a timed bread machine. Likely if a human were involved in the middle of the operation, he'd see when the dough had risen enough or properly, and move to the next step THEN. In my set up, the timer does it on the same timetable every time.

    The worst loaf of bread I made was an original Sally Lunn that uses less yeast than I quoted in my wheat recipe. I had mistakenly used a tablespoon instead of a teaspoon (so doesn't that mean I tripled the salt amount?) and instead of a fluffy loaf 9-10 inches high, it was a heavy brick about 3 inches high.

    Regarding the high butter content of a Sally Lunn type of recipe, I think that's Sally's cornerstone; buttery, fluffy, and sweet.

    Yes, if I do try using olive oil in place of butter, I will post back here what I found to work for me.
    Last edited by FamilyMan; 11-01-2011 at 23:23. Reason: because this site can't properly print a percent sign

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