Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 48

Thread: A very long Moose report

  1. #1
    Member tboehm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Soldotna AK
    Posts
    2,407

    Default A very long Moose report

    Well, I got home and things have been a little hectic and it’s taken me a little bit to get my story put on the idiot box.
    I hope that you enjoy my hunting story. Many here may remember my first Alaskan hunting adventure with my wife that was on a river up in the Brooks Range and the taking of 2 caribou 5 years ago. From that moment on I fell in love with the beauty of what is truly “God’s Country” and have been going back every year since.
    I GOT MY FIRST MOOSE!!!!!!
    Many here know our host Mike. Mike and I became good friends a few years back before he bought the forum. I asked him if he had some time and would like to join me this year and as luck would have it we were able to make plans. We decided to go with Papa Bear Adventures out of Bethel.
    Some may remember some heated debates as to the merits of this outfit compared to another outfit that works out of Bethel as well. I am here to tell you that there is no comparison. Carl and Steve Powers run a first class operation that would be hard to beat. They are very thorough. All of the equipment that they offer is in top condition. The lodge is large, comfortable and clean. They follow the rules and everything is above board and the great thing is they don’t over hunt or stack hunters, which lends to their high success rate.
    I arrived in anchorage a couple days early to get organized. I like to allow extra time for airlines to lose baggage and not cause a stroke. I have also been going so much that I have rented a temperature controlled storage unit to allow me to leave most of my hunting gear there. It works out to be cheaper in the long run so I’m not paying for excess baggage and overweight things as well.
    While doing a little running around I made time to stop by Wiggy’s and shoot the breeze with a fellow Jarhead and drink all of his coffee. It was good to see him. Sorry I didn’t get a chance to stop back by before I left.
    Now a many of my hunting partners will tell you, I’m a gear guy and love getting new stuff and having everything under the sun. I’m always looking for ways to justify new gear. I have been eyeballing the Sitka stuff for a couple of years but never really had the opportunity to put my hands on the stuff and wasn’t willing to spend that kind of money over the net. Well, Sportsman’s had some in stock and I couldn’t resist. I spent 2 days hemming and hawing about it. Mike and I had to make a stop by Barney’s and they had some as well. I preferred to give my money to the small guy so I bought everything but a vest and gloves there and got the rest at Sportsman’s because Barneys didn’t have my size. I went with the Open Country mid weights; I got the Timberline pants and Jetstream jacket with vest. I will share that the gear performed beautifully and I really loved the pants. They have a waterproof rear and knees with removable padding that really saved mine that Marine Corps has destroyed.
    We were to arrive in Bethel on the 12th to hit the bush but I wanted to get there a little early to allow for weather, problems, checking the zero on my 338 win mag. After traveling 4000 miles so we caught the afternoon flight on Alaskan airlines to Bethel. The short flight took about an hour and as luck would have, it 2 bags were missing, imagine that!! I should also share that Mike had some things pre-packed and we had sent a large plastic fish tote on Alaska as cargo ahead to save on time, cost, etc and it would also give us something safer to back haul meat in. Those that have read his book know that the man is full of ideas and is completely organized. One of his little tricks is to have all of the food separated and ready. On this trip, Mike was going to have to give up his cooler full of frozen premade meals to include steaks, salad, etc. Heck, everyone here knows that any man that float hunts with a super leopard would never over pack! Well, this trip was going to include the use of a supercub, so we had to shave as much weight as possible and Mike didn’t go on a diet at all! We had breakfast of oatmeal, bagels, and hot drinks packed in a compactor trash bag tied and then put in a medium grain bag from Alaska mill and feed and then that bag gets tied. Lunch was put in Ziplocs with snacks of cracker, jerky, (Mike kept hogging all of the Teriyaki flavor) nuts, candy bars, cookies and the entire isle 5 from Costco. This way you just grabbed a Ziploc and threw it in your day pack for that days hunt. Dinner was of coarse Mountain House, placed in its own compactor/grain bag. We did also take along some mustard, tuna, miracle whip, peanut butter, bread and the number one military required accessory……. hot sauce. All of the meal bags were labeled which made meal time super easy.
    Sorry that I got off on a little bit of a tangent but my intent is to share a little more info than just your standard hunting thread. I guess that I should also state that it is not my intention to sound like an expert in any way. Much of what I am writing about has been learned from the members here and things that Mike has been kind enough to teach me. Really, this level of info is intended for those who are non-residents like myself who don’t do this kind of thing all of the time.
    So back to Bethel, we spent the rest of the day and evening repacking and trying to cut more weight. Steve, the owner, said that he would check the airline for our missing bags and bring them in the morning. Carl was kind enough to take us out to the sand dunes to check our zeros. 3 shots confirmed that the storm rifle case had done its job and I was on the money with about a 1 ½” group kneeling with Primo’s trigger bipod shooting stix. I should also share here that I was shooting reloads of Barnes TTSX 210 grains with 74.5 grains of 4350 pushing 2800 fps. We ordered a burger delivered from a local joint and settled in for the night. Sleep eluded me from a combination of jet lag and extreme excitement from the pending hunt.
    September 12 arrived and the hunt was on. We were told that breakfast would be at 8am. Steve’s wife Robin walked in a minute and a half early with a casserole that was to die for. Then Steve walks in to tell me that my bags were on their way back to NC!!! Man, he had me going for about a minute and then he couldn’t keep a straight face. I about DIED! And I still owe him for that one.
    Semper Fi and God Bless

  2. #2
    Member tboehm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Soldotna AK
    Posts
    2,407

    Default

    The plan was to utilize 2 planes, the supercub on floats and a beaver. The lake that the lodge is on is small so all of our gear would be loaded in a truck and taken over to the river a few miles a away and we would load Mike and a small amount of gear in the cub and they would head north while I would load up the beaver with the rest of the gear and head north as well. Carl would take Mike to a small lake for our drop off that had about 2/10th of a mile portage to our river. Mean while my pilot would take me into a larger lake not far from our drop off and deposit me with the rest of the gear for Carl to ferry me and the remaining gear to Mike’s location which would involve 2 trips for the cub. The pilot coordinated their timing perfectly, Carl showed up at the same time as we did in the Beaver and the hand off went smooth as possible. Carl loaded the cub to the max with gear and I had to wait about 20 minutes for him to return to fetch me and the remainder of our gear. Mike had managed to make a couple of trips and found our way to the river. Why he didn’t have more moved by the time I got there is beyond me.


    Our portage had taken a couple of hours to complete and we found ourselves tired out but there was no rest for the weary. We made the decision that we would spend a couple of days hunting our drop off spot as it looked perfectly moosey and the scenery was spectacular. We made the decision to make camp on a tiny little island that wasn’t much wider than the 8 man Kifaru Tipi that was bought for this trip.

    I will share at this point that the tipi worked fantastically. I had decided on the Titanium Goat stove for the tipi but the temperatures never really called for it so nothing to report on the stove besides that my initial impression is that I like the way that its put together and I did do an initial burn and set up on it prior to the trip. Mike had some concerns about the tipi having never used one and there were a couple of aspects of its construction. He was concerned about the lack of floor as well as bug issues. When I had ordered the tipi I got them to add an additional skirt around the bottom to help with rain runoff, uneven terrain and bugs. I did purchase the liner and bug netting as well. I should note that the 8 man Kifaru seems to be better constructed than the Goat. After a set up or two the ease at which it’s set up is nice and can be done in the dark which I had done on our take out. The 8 man is the first size that a 6’ man can stand up in and put his trousers on. While we had some wind the first couple of days, it was nothing to speak of and note the stability of the tipi but I do believe that it can withstand the punishment that Alaska can dish out. The floorless thing was new for me as well. I had brought a couple of small tarps what weighed very little and folded up small. We used those to lie on the bare ground and to provide some protection from moisture as well as providing protection for our sleeping pads. I’m sold on the tipi to be sure. One drawback that we did experience is that the footprint for the tipi is large so finding suitable campsites can become an issue. The river that we were on had practically no gravel banks to speak of and lots of thicker vegetation along its banks and when you are trying to find a 15’ round level spot it can be tougher than you think. On the flip side the tipi will flex and move all around the uneven ground just fine. If weight would allow, small rollup cots would be the cat’s meow. The one nice thing was, not having to worry about getting mud or dirt in the tent and having to get half undressed in a vestibule to leave your wet clothes and boots. The tipi is no different in company sizing aspect. The 8 man is good for 3 or 4 guys and if you were using the stove I wouldn’t want more than 3. With just the 2 of us we had a condo although Mike was constantly taking up more than his half. While on the subject of sleeping arrangements I’ll share that I used the military sleep system that is 2 bags in one with a gortex shell. As most know it’s a synthetic system and was over kill but I was coming from NC and while the cold doesn’t bother me much I wasn’t taking chances. For the sleeping pad I purchased a new NeoAir All Season. This thing is 2.5” thick weighs 1lb 9oz (I got the 25” wide) and a 4.9 r value. I have had others that failed, were too thin and or cold, this thing is great!

    Semper Fi and God Bless

  3. #3
    Member tboehm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Soldotna AK
    Posts
    2,407

    Default

    Back to the hunt……..I know… it’s about time. It took 3 more trips to get all of the gear to our camp spot and we had camp all set up by 6 pm. Tired and hungry, it was sweet and sour pork and rice for me with tortillas and for dessert it was raspberry crumb, not too shabby. We sat and talked enjoying the beauty of our surroundings. The temp seemed to be in the mid to high 40’s and things were perfect. We decided to turn in about 9pm with some light still on the horizon and a slight drizzle in the air. Sleep came hard as thought of the Alaskan monsters filled my head and the smells, sights and sounds seem bright and thunderous. I prayed that the good Lord would find us worthy as sleep finally enveloped.

    The first legal day to hunt was ready to begin and I was up at 5:30 am and couldn’t believe that it was still so dark. Trying to hold back my excitement and being somewhat quiet as Mike was continuing to saw large logs I got dressed and went outside. I’m sure that I started making more noise to encourage my partner to get moving. I think his years of experience knew there was no hurrying required but he didn’t say a word and we got the show on the road. The plan was to make use of the elevation on the far side of the river as it would provide excellent view advantage. Mike had previously explained to me that the name of the game is sitting and glassing as to not stink up your area with scent and I was well prepared for that mentally. We sat all day until 9:30 pm having seen 6 cows and 3 bulls. One bull had come barely close enough. We had heard a couple of cows in the distance and moved a couple hundred yards to investigate. Having spotted them, we waited, watched, and enjoyed the show. They crossed from our side of the river to the other and disappeared in the foliage. After a while I heard the distinct sound of a soft grunt. It continued to grow louder and louder but we couldn’t locate the source. We were on a high steep hill overlooking the river when he finally showed himself. The problem was the vegetation was thick and we didn’t see him till he was out in the river and sideways to us. Mike was trying to evaluate his size but the angles were all wrong. We could tell that he was nice but not much more than that. I was ready to shoot but Mike had told me one of the number one rules in moose hunting…” Don’t shoot them in the water!!” The bull had crossed almost exactly where the cows had crossed. When he hit the opposite bank he wasn’t stopping and there was nothing but thick vegetation as well. With nothing to lose I let out a long cow call and stopped him. We had our first better glimpse of him and later Mike estimated him to be in the 63” range. The problem was, he was about 250 yards quartering away and it would have been a quick offhand shot on the steep bank. I let him go…….. It was the first day and no sense rushing a shot and chancing the wounding of an animal. There was plenty of time left but man he was grand! We also saw a real trophy of a black bear. He was a little too far off to make an attempt on him and with no moose yet, bears would have to wait. Mike stated that he was probably the biggest he had ever seen in Alaska and was well over 7’ and may have gone close to 8’. We watched him continue up through the blueberry fields and over the mountain top never stopping. If he had stopped for a nap things might have been different with his new resting place on Mike’s daughter’s new cabin floor in front of the fireplace. He was trophy of a life time but our goal was moose first, and bear second.


    Semper Fi and God Bless

  4. #4
    Member tboehm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Soldotna AK
    Posts
    2,407

    Default

    Day 2 started of pretty much the same as day 1. Again I was up encouraging my partner that daylight was burning. Breakfast had been instant oatmeal and a bagel with peanut butter and jelly. We sat at our spot on the hill and at times separating a hundred yards or so to allow more area coverage. With not much happening and with it raining fairly well we decided on a hot lunch of ramen and tortillas. That evening Mike spotted a bull that was about 2miles off that was worth investigating. After watching him for a while it appeared that there was a chance that he would head our way and he was making good time. We decided to set up and ambush and wait for him. I had done a little bit of calling down the valley early in the evening. WE never caught sight of our bull again. It was getting late and we had eaten lots of snacks throughout the day so a simple tuna sandwich was supper and we hit the rack at 10:15 that evening.

    Day 3 we had gotten a late start. No, I know what you’re thinking; it wasn’t because I couldn’t get Mike out of bed again. It had been raining pretty good through the night and it was still raining. On the way up to our spot on the hill I spotted a bull on the opposite side of the river. After glassing for a short time we located him through the trees to determine that he was small, 30” or so. We called at him and brought him over to our side and continued to close the distance until he caught our scent and ran off. What fun we were having. Mike was fairly certain that he had come in from my previous nights calling. We stayed on our hill glassing until noon and decided to get some lunch and get out of the rain for a while. After lunch and a short nap the rain let up some so it was back up to our vantage point on the hill. Things seemed to have died down. Mike was wondering what he would have done in his younger and dumber years……….. so we headed up river with the wind in our faces for about a mile as the crow flies. We saw some new terrain but no game. While sitting, glassing, talking and just in general enjoying God’s creation we were treated to a spectacular show. The rain was coming and going all around us. Rainbows start popping up all over the place and I lost count. We saw a double rainbow, a fully developed rainbow with no clouds obstructing its beauty. We were in awe over the beauty of the moment and felt gifted. With it starting to get late and no game in sight we headed back to our little patch on the hill that now had permanent indentations of our hind ends. The rain and the wind continued for the rest of the evening. I did some more calling having been encouraged by the small bull showing up and the reaction of the big bull on our first day. Mike was encouraging as well, saying that my calling sounded good. I’m not sure if he was just being kind, honest, or maybe a little bit of both but I was having fun!! We headed back to camp for some supper consisting of mountain house and hot chocolate. As the light was fading fast and we were enjoying a hot meal, Mike spotted a cow on the ridgeline across the river staring at us unable to make us out. We called at her a little and brought her a little closer but lost her to the darkness.



    Semper Fi and God Bless

  5. #5
    Member tboehm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Soldotna AK
    Posts
    2,407

    Default

    Day 4 (September 15th) after a quick bagel and coffee we were back to our favorite hill. By now we’re more than familiar with every nook and cranny for a mile in each direction. We waited till 11am and made the decision that the area was shot and it was time to move. Tearing down camp and getting the raft loaded took a little longer than expected but soon we were off to explore more of our river.


    The scenery was beautiful, with the water clear and clean, colors changing, the sun was shining, and the temperature was perfect. We made a few different stops looking for a suitable camp but we were having trouble due to the footprint of our tipi. After searching for a while we were losing daylight and more river than we liked, we found a spot that looked good. It was a stand of trees on river left that was an outside bend which made things a little difficult due to the bank and speed of the water but it would have to do. The area looked good and we would be out of sight, protected from the weather but it was a little tight but soon camp was in place. It was about 5 pm and we had traveled about 5 miles. Not soon after getting set up we were greeted by a cow and calf right on the other side of the river not 50 yards away. We were feeling pretty good about our choice of location. There was a field close to camp and we set up at the edge to watch both directions of the river. We heard some noise across the river but were unsure if it was a bull or cow. They were soft and low, it may have even been both. There was plenty of sign all around and we were excited. We moved up river some and Mike did some grunting and scraping and breaking of limbs but nothing came out. About an hour later Mike spotted a bull across the field back behind camp in the trees. We watched him for a little bit and he finally came out in the open. There wasn’t much time for decisions. The wind was completely wrong and he would have our scent soon. The goal was anything over 50” and Mike confirmed that he was. The sun was making things really difficult for me as it was right in my eyes and I was having trouble relocating him in my scope. The terrain was difficult and I ended up in a semi kneeing position using my Primos bipod shooting stixs. Mike said if you want him it’s now or never. I finally found him and let the 210 grain .338 fly. The report sounded followed by the unmistakable thump. I hit him and he lunged forward. Re-chambering, I lost him in the sun again. Mike was telling me to hit him again and as soon as hair filled the scope I squeezed the trigger. Again the thump was sounded with a solid hit. The cycle repeated itself again, losing him in the sun and trying to get a solid stable platform……. I let the third and final shot fly. Mike saw the third and final hit home as well, and he went down hard. I got my first ALASKAN MOOSE!!!!!!!!! The shots were just shy of 300 yards and the moose was in an open field a little more than 200 yards from camp. After handshakes, hugs and celebrating we went to check out my moose. The first thing after ensuring that he was dead we sent a spot message with the 2G to the wives letting them know that we were bring home the bacon! Actually my family had informed me that if I didn’t get a moose that I might want to consider not coming home.


    I will share that I am fairly sure that 100% of the messages sent to our wives were received. I tried to make sure that a check in message was sent every morning and every evening. It really brought some comfort to the wives. We did have a sat phone with us that was provided by Papa Bear but we resisted the temptation to call. On the take out float I activated the tracking feature as well. In tracking our progress down river we made anywhere from 2 to 4 mph.
    As many seasoned moose hunters will tell you, the fun was over and the work had begun. We worked till 2 am before we were finished. During the skinning process we recovered 2 of the bullets. They looked to have retained the majority of their mass and had mushroomed perfectly. Tired and wore out, we went back to camp and skipped dinner. Besides a couple of standard skinning knifes we both used the Havalon knifes for the majority of the work. They are fantastic and I would say that they need to be a standard in any game kit. The one other thing that I make sure that I have is a bunch of nitrile gloves. I do this not so much for worry about diseases or dirty hands but the main thing is that they keep me from getting bit up by bugs while working and it wasn’t long before Mike was asking for a pair. The temperatures were low and there was no worry of spoilage. I almost forgot to mention that Mike’s evaluation was on the money and my first moose measured at just over 56” I couldn’t have been happier or prouder!!!!
    Semper Fi and God Bless

  6. #6
    Member tboehm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Soldotna AK
    Posts
    2,407

    Default




    We got up the next morning a little late and made a good breakfast of oatmeal, coffee and bagels. I think it’s important to share that while I like a little sugar in my coffee, we were heavy in the food department because Mike insists on having that FuFu stuff (2 different kinds to boot) Checking the temp I found it to be 36 degrees which confirmed our thoughts on the meat care. We had made the decision to do our own testing of game bags. With all of the debates on the forum between Tag bags and Cotton bags we thought that it would be interesting to do a side by side comparison.

    The Tag Bags are a lot lighter than traditional cotton bags but they do have some breathing and drying issues. I think that it’s a good rule to actually have both.

    The Tag Bags make it easier to carry with you in a day pack so that you have them with you immediately at the kill sight while the heavier cotton bags stay in camp. We made a nice meat pole and with the lower bear population we felt confident in having it a little closer to camp. I will say that both bags preformed well and the meat formed a nice dry crust. We did remove the ribs whole so they went in the cotton bags as the tag bags would have ripped from the sharp edges. The other thing by having both is it gives you the ability to switch bags out to allow better drying and it also allows for damaging a bad. We had brought citric acid along but with the temps being lower and the flies almost non-existent there was no need for its use. I should also mention here that if you are hunting and worried about weight don’t listen to your hunting partner about not needing Thermacells, take them no matter what anyone tells you.

    Back to the morning after…… With a good breakfast and some sleep it was time to get the meat back to camp. It really couldn’t have been much easier and I was thankful. Only 200 or so yards it was a quick pack and Mike was nice enough to allow me to carry both hind quarters. After all the meat was taken care of and hanging neatly on our pole. Mike took the cape and a chair and went to work turning the nose, lips and ears while watching the kill site for a wondering bear. After a short while I hear Mike yell for me and I came running to find another bull moose in the middle of the river. He stood there long enough for a picture before high tailing it out of there. Had Mike decided that he wanted another moose he would have been toast but Mike was looking for a bear if anything, one moose for the two of us was perfect. After a few camp chores I joined Mike at the river’s edge helping with the cape and keeping a watchful eye on the kill site. We finished the cape right at dark and got it salted. Due to the limited weight and going in on the cub we had decided with some encouragement to only bring 25 lbs of salt leaving the other 25 back at the lodge. In hind sight I think that we could have gotten away with bringing it and would have like to have had it with us.
    Semper Fi and God Bless

  7. #7
    Member tboehm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Soldotna AK
    Posts
    2,407

    Default

    The morning of the 17th we got up and decided that we would call for an early takeout if possible. We thought that we could make it to the takeout and get things moved before dark so the call was made and Steve said to call him when we got to the take out and we would see.



    By our calculations we had about 19 river miles to go. Well, I guess that we were a little more tired than we thought because it took us until 1 pm to get loaded and on our way. The float was uneventful but the beauty spectacular. We saw plenty of fish breaking the surface, (the one thing that we forgot……a rod). And we did see one more second year calf. Mike had estimated that we would make it by 7pm….. we got there are 6:15, not too shabby. The one thing that we really didn’t account for in our plan was how long it would take to move all of our gear and moose the ¼ mile from the river over some tundra to our take out lake. When we called the lodge they said to call in the morning………..and I’m sure someone was laughing at the other end. We worked until 10:30 moving moose and gear to the point that we were exhausted. There was also the very real possibility of breaking an ankle or leg not being able to see and placing a foot wrong so we called it quits. All the meat was moved except for the ribs and the cape plus about 6 loads of gear for morning. I set up the tipi in the dark on the tundra and didn’t care that it was uneven as heck and wet to boot.



    Semper Fi and God Bless

  8. #8
    Member tboehm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Soldotna AK
    Posts
    2,407

    Default

    The morning we woke to a dense fog and no planes would be flying.



    We got the rest of the gear moved in fairly short order but the muscles were screaming bloody murder. I will share that Mike carried the raft on the drop off and the take out. It’s nice to have a bigger guy as a hunting buddy. Our take out lake was big enough for the Beaver to get in but not take off with a full load. It took most of the day for it to clear enough for the plane to get in and there was the real possibility that we were going to spend another day waiting. As luck would have it the rain held off and the fog lifted with the skies having about a 1200’ ceiling. We made the call and in short order heard the sound of a Beaver on final approach. We quickly load half the gear and I and the pilot made a short hop to a larger lake and unloaded. He returned with Mike and the rest of the gear in short order and again we loaded the rest of the gear and we were off. Man you could tell that the Beaver was heavy and it took some effort and with a slow climb we were headed back to Bethel.

    Once back to civilization we got unloaded and did some checking on the weight of the moose. One hind quarter weighed 124 lbs, all of the meat weighed-in at 754 lbs, the antlers were 44lbs. We were able to find a local guy that was starting up a butchering service so we decided to give him a try that way it would get done faster, the meat would get fully frozen for my 15 hours travel time back to North Carolina. We did hold one quarter back so we could take it to Indian Valley to have some specialty stuff made.
    God truly blessed me with success in more ways than one and Alaska has me hooked like an addict. I would like to publicly thank a true friend, Mike Strahan. Without his help, advice and friendship this trip wouldn’t have been possible. I would also like to thank all the members of the Outdoors Directory Forum for their help and contributions. I know this has been long but I wanted to do my best to share my adventure and blessings with all.

    Semper Fi and God Bless
    Semper Fi and God Bless

  9. #9

    Default

    Nothing beats a well-told first person story of adventure. Great description of the hunt and wonderful pictures! Best of the best to you on taking your first moose, and thanks for allowing me to share the thrill. Here's hoping "first" doesn't mean "last" or "only"!

  10. #10
    Moderator kingfisherktn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Ketchikan, AK
    Posts
    4,076

    Default

    Tom: Great trip, great report and hunting partner. Are you sure that 30" moose came into the calling from the previous night or was it because Mike was sawing logs.

  11. #11
    Member Knute78's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Council Grove, Kansas
    Posts
    220

    Default

    Great, thorough, story. It was a very good read. Congrats on your 1st moose.

  12. #12
    Member summitx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Los Anchorage
    Posts
    400

    Default

    Great story and Semper Fi

  13. #13
    New member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    wauchula, florida
    Posts
    7

    Default

    Tom, Thanks for sharing your story. Sounds like y'all had a wonderful trip.It was a great read and alot of good information in there. Congrats!
    All the best, George

  14. #14
    Member Smokey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Central Illinois
    Posts
    3,334

    Default

    Very well done story tboehm, you did a great job with details! Looks and sounds like a Fantastic hunt-congrats to You and Mike!
    Thx for the post!
    When asked what state I live in I say "The State of Confusion", better known as IL....

  15. #15
    Member bnkwnto's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Eagle River Alaska, United States,
    Posts
    540

    Default

    Nice long hunting story! Thanks for taking the time to share so many details and of course we all love the pictures.

  16. #16
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks Area
    Posts
    7,273

    Default

    Great report and thanks for taking us all along. Nice to see guys my age still out getting it done, well done Gentleman!!!


    Steve
    "I refuse to let the things I can't do stop me from doing the things I can"
    Founding Member
    http://www.residenthuntersofalaska.org/

  17. #17
    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Delta Junction
    Posts
    4,078

    Default

    Superb hunt and congrats to the both of you! Rep in inbound

  18. #18
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    376

    Default

    Nice 1st bull along with a Great story!

  19. #19
    New member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    2,022

    Default

    Outstanding in every respect, well written, beautiful pics, a dandy bull moose and great partnership to share the experience with.
    Congratulations and thanks for sharing !

  20. #20
    Member bushrat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Now residing in Fairbanks from the bush
    Posts
    4,363

    Default

    Tom,

    Congrats! Great writeup and pics! Just wish you'd have used some paragraph breaks <grin>. Glad the Kifaru worked out well for ya, guess you never put the TiGoat stove together, but nice to have along. How'd that new meat processor do on most of the meat?

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •