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Thread: what is your favorite late season cow moose tactics?

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    Member Spookum's Avatar
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    Default what is your favorite late season cow moose tactics?

    Hello all, i have been so busy filling up the wood box lately i forgot about my late season cow tag. I was wondering if anyone had some general advice. I was going to try to stay near water, off the 3 wheeler, and close into the willows. Kind of still hunt like i used to for white tail growing up. I dont think calling will do any good, unless somone has any better advice?

    thanks all!

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spookum View Post
    Hello all, i have been so busy filling up the wood box lately i forgot about my late season cow tag. I was wondering if anyone had some general advice. I was going to try to stay near water, off the 3 wheeler, and close into the willows. Kind of still hunt like i used to for white tail growing up. I dont think calling will do any good, unless somone has any better advice?

    thanks all!
    I don't know, but as one who has never hunted cows it seems like a calf bleat might work. Might call in a late season bear though.

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    I have done one late cow hunt and it was pretty straight forward. Go slow, glass a bunch, find a cow, stalk it and close the deal. No leaves on the trees and they are looking for willow brows moving predominately early and late but will be up and down all day for short periods. Recommend getting out early cause butchering at night in the dark and cold sux. If you get one early you have all day to get it broke down and hauled out.

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    Member Ernie Scar's Avatar
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    Just got back from a late season cow hunt, hunted the lower elevation and found a few but they all had calves. Glassed up into an open valley found a bunch of moose, bulls and cows, we snuck in and I was able to kill a dry cow. I only really hunted the one day but I saw more up high than I did down low.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ernie Scar View Post
    Just got back from a late season cow hunt, hunted the lower elevation and found a few but they all had calves. Glassed up into an open valley found a bunch of moose, bulls and cows, we snuck in and I was able to kill a dry cow. I only really hunted the one day but I saw more up high than I did down low.
    I have seen them up high this time of year as well, often several dry cows and a couple bulls in a group, just up from treeline in little valleys.

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    Member Frostbitten's Avatar
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    My favorite late season cow moose tactic is to marinade it for about 30-45 minutes, then grill over a charcoal fire.

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    Member SkinnyD's Avatar
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    wait until the road gets slick, then drive 55 down Holmes... you'll see a cow all right
    Passing up shots on mergansers since 1992.


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    Member Spookum's Avatar
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    Well i just looked out the window, and i see a skiff of white stuff. i was told to not to try to find freash tracks and track a moose down, normally they move too far for a guy to cetch up to. This is great advice guys, and i think if there getst to be more snow, im going to drive down Holmes rod . But in all seriousness, i think someone told me some where that when the snow hits the ground the moose try to sock up in the willow thickets? If somone wanted to take a look at this: it is my hunting unit. http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/index.cfm...tfile_id=11026

    i was thinking of going down river from where the tolavana crosses the eiliot highway.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Spookum View Post
    Well i just looked out the window, and i see a skiff of white stuff. i was told to not to try to find freash tracks and track a moose down, normally they move too far for a guy to cetch up to. This is great advice guys, and i think if there getst to be more snow, im going to drive down Holmes rod . But in all seriousness, i think someone told me some where that when the snow hits the ground the moose try to sock up in the willow thickets? If somone wanted to take a look at this: it is my hunting unit. http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/index.cfm...tfile_id=11026

    i was thinking of going down river from where the tolavana crosses the eiliot highway.
    I have DM706 tag and hunted this past Friday through Monday. I focused mostly right along the Tolovana River but had no luck. Didn't even see a moose actually, that included a fair amount of glassing from the higher vantage points. We had fog roll in on Sunday up high so that hindered my attempts to hunt the higher elevation stuff towards the western end of the unit. Not sure I'll make it back later in the season. Lots of good vantage points to glass from along the southwest end of your unit. Best of luck on your hunt!

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    Member Spookum's Avatar
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    did you see any sign out in the burn at all?

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    personally I would let it freeze up if it hasn't already up that way then try and get one near the darn road. My cousin was patient with his valley cow tag and finally lucked into one 1/2 mile from the trailhead where we were hunting. Drove the wheelers right to it. I imagine you can make a cow hunt into a "real" moose hunt if you are so inclined but I have no complaints regarding our hunt and we spotted the cow from the comfort of my F150 super crew. Shot it within 100 yards of the truck and was grateful to be able to climb into the cab to get warm a couple times. FYI the moose were in a harem, about 12 cows and a herd bull and they walked out into a willow field. Funny that there was nothing in that field when we drove through the first time but it was full of moose right before dark.

    ps, when you get one watch your back for the bull! Wife shot a "hot" cow and about 30 minutes after she was down old boy came back to round her up! After a bunch of loud conversation with brush thrashing in response he finally left without an "altercation". I was starting to wonder what the troopers were going to think if we had to DLP him.

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    Member SkinnyD's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spookum View Post
    If somone wanted to take a look at this: it is my hunting unit. http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/index.cfm...tfile_id=11026
    You were smart to wait for cooler weather. Just drive over there and get on a high spot and watch. I was practically dodging them every mile along the highway coming back from a duck hunt this weekend. I saw a nice bull chasing a cow... right down the middle of the road and right in the middle of your hunt area.
    Passing up shots on mergansers since 1992.


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    Member Spookum's Avatar
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    about what time? morning or nite?

    @lu sounds like a plan. Spotting ans stalking on the south west end of the unit is sounding like a better and better deal all the time. Keep the ideas coming guys.

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Spookum View Post
    did you see any sign out in the burn at all?
    Not much sign in the burn, at least not in the burn area I checked. Things are starting the freeze up pretty well in that area, including slow moving spots on the Tolovana River as of Monday morning. Brown Lake was half frozen as of Sunday and probably frozen completely that night. The freshest sign I saw was along the willow patches next to the river. But even all that stuff was frozen so it was a bit hard deciphering just how old it was. On the plus side, all the frozen ground made traversing the tussocks much easier.

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    Member homerdave's Avatar
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    my favorite cow moose tactic?

    head shot from 30 yds.
    Alaska Board of Game 2015 tour... "Kicking the can down the road"
    http://www.alaskabackcountryhunters.org/

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    Member willphish4food's Avatar
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    I wasn't hunting moose, but mid October a few years ago I tried calf distress bleat to bring in a bear, and had a very distressed cow come roaring in. Literally- I thought it was a bull or a bear roaring; was quite surprised when the cow and her grown calf came beating in. So I would definitely try a calf distress bleat- it was a total blast watching that cow come in.

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    Member Spookum's Avatar
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    Hi guys. I drove from the dalton high way all the way down to the minto turn off twice. All i saw was 3 sets of tracks in the snow in the burn area. Best i could come up with was around the willows near the toavana, but even then it wasn't the greatest. is it possible that the cows are still rutting and in harems back off the road still?

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    Member Yellowknife's Avatar
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    Spookem,

    I spent a bunch of time up in that general area of the country last Oct/Nov. Racked up hundred of miles on the snowmachines/ATV's/bootleather (for work) as well as many highway trips as far as the Minto turn off. What I found:

    Very few moose near the highway in Oct and early Nov. Saw just a handful of tracks on the ridge tops near Livengood. Almost nothing in the valleys. Once the snow arrived in serious amounts (mid Nov), they moved into the Tolovona and surrounding valleys BIG time. Went from no tracks to seeing 4-8 moose per day. Had to keep chasing them off the trails and roads. Not sure if they moved in from the flats or from the White Mt's, but the area was obviously subject to a seasonal migration. Based on that experience I would suggest hunting/glassing the high ridge top willow patches until near the end of your season, then hit the valley bottoms. Tracks in the snow will give you a good idea of where they were spending their time.

    Good luck,

    Yk

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    Member .300wby's Avatar
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    My favorite late season pregnant cow moose tactic is let them live to calve.

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    Member Spookum's Avatar
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    Thank you yellow knife, ill give it a try. Do you think i should run up river (north) from the bridge where it goes over the tolavana or south?

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