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Thread: Opinons on Sighting in a new rifle and new scope

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    Default Opinons on Sighting in a new rifle and new scope

    From your point of veiw what is the best methods of sighting in your rifle scope im talking about sitting down and taking your time. I have sighted in several rifles but want other ppls opinon on what you can do to make it the best? I just bought the Burris E1 3x9 i have read the reviews and no one has complained about it but the normally ppl that nothing is good enough for them. Im mounting it on my Panther Arms LR-308L Thanks for any help or comments you may have.

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    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    Default New scope... sighting in


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    Mount the optics then...

    #1: I like my green laser bore sighter and it does a better job of getting me real close to dead on than I thought it would. This has become my favorite method of getting on paper.

    #2 method: Pull the pins on the lower receiver and remove the upper assembly. Remove the bolt carrier group then place the upper assembly in a vice or place in a very stable position on a table. Point it at an object about 100, or so, yards away. Bend over and look down the barrel then look through the scope. Adjust the scope so that the cross-hairs are are in the center of the 100 yard sight picture you see when looking through the barrel.

    Either method works. The laser is actually easier and more accurate but it costs money where #2 won't cost you a nickel.

    Have fun with your new 308. I have a 308 AR from GA Precision and I absolutely love shooting that thing. By far it's my favorite rifle.

    MyTime

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    I have come to the opinion that sighting a hunting rifle in according to maximum point blank range (MPBR) is the way to go. Oddly enough, with the high sectional-density bullets I prefer (0.30+), almost always a 25 yard zero is also within a few yards of a MBPR zero. Just set up a target at the 25 yard line level with the bore of the rifle from the bench and put one of those orange pasters on the bullseye. Then remove the bolt and center the orange dot in the bore. Holding the rifle still in the rest, then center the crosshairs on the orange dot and you should be very close. A few shots to fine tune and you are there.

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    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    I do it the same way. Visual bore sight at 25. Fire a few rounds at 25 to confirm. Move target out to 100 using a 3' tall blank piece of paper behind the target so I can see any misses. Adjust from there. I usually can get a rifle on in 5 or 6 rounds.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

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    You can call me lazy or say I have ADD - but I usually just set up a target at 25 and have a very fine aiming point in center - fire a round - count number of clicks I need either L/R or U/D depending on the furthest away from center - shoot again - move the shorter of the two from the first shot this time - shoot again and then back off to 100yards and repeat. I have found I like moving only one direction at a time best for me - if you have any (cant) in your scope from an improper mount you can chase the POI around a lot by moving both dials at same time from my experience....
    Make sure you give your barrel time to cool down between rounds - depending on temperture that could be from 1 minute to 10 or more. I have even sat my gun in my air conditioned vehicle on hot days to speed the process.... First 5 or so shots to get on paper are not as critical - it is for the fine tuning though...
    Good Luck
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    Fire one shot at 25 yards, adjust, fire a 2nd shot, then off to 100

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    There are a couple i have never heard of before all of those sounds like they will work ill pick one and try it.I have tried the borescope laser and didnt work out for me so gun shy to use that method again Will it matter on the cold temps here in fairbanks now to when i get to pull it out in the spring? or will it work out better cause of the cool down time?

  9. #9

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    I place the rifle in the gun cradle on a table in the garage and center the bore on the bottom of a white paper cup that is about 20 yds. away, then I move the reticle to the center of the cup. When I get to the range I shoot at a target and get my windage, then my elevation with in a couple of inches. Then it is out to a hundred yards, then to 200 yards. Once my 30-06 or .338 is dead on at 200 yards I am done. I use a 200 yard zero because I want the scopes reticle to be close to where the bullet is supposed to go. In the last 3 years the posters on this forum have proven the average distance for the all important first shot in Alaska is about 150 yards. So I sight in for the distance I am most likely to shoot on a hunt, not the distance I might shoot every once in a blue moon. Works for me.

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    Paper it at 25 yds. Saves a lot of ammo, then out to 100yds . After that your on your own.

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    IF it's a new rifle don't forget some kind of "break in" , at least a boresnake between each shot for the first 10, AT LEAST - if you sight at 25 yds first remember your scope clicks are normally calibrated for 1/4" at 100 yds so at 25 it will be different ! I can boresight a bagged rifle at 100 yds and be within 8" normally, usually closer - only adjust your scope's windage OR elevation, NEVER adjust both or you might be chasing holes all over the target - I am in the habit, not sayin' it's a "must", of moving 4 clicks past what I am adjusting to and then backing up those 4 clicks, sometimes there is a little "lag" in the inner mechanism and this might help - I have adjusted and the next shot hits in the same spot then the next shot(s) move, that really can mess with your head ! some years ago I was "trying" to sight a Leupold 3x9 and it had me so flustered I was spittin' cotton - I took the scope to Leupold and they had installed the windage & elevation directions dials on the wrong turrets, now THAT really messed with me !!

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    Thanks everyone im going to put alittle of every thing i have learned on here in to this i want to do it right and take my time. Thank You

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