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Thread: In A Strange Land With A Stranger!

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    Member akrstabout's Avatar
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    Default In A Strange Land With A Stranger!

    First off I can't express enough thanks to strangerinastrangeland and his family and extended family! They made us feel like family and made us fit right in. Both stranger and HuntAK59 have posted threads, I won't repeat but will add my view. We were equally facinated with each other, especially strangers kids.

    Another first off, there are eskimos in alaska! I had always heard and had been told no eskimos in alaska, been here 16.5 years and I now know for a fact there are! I absolutely love Strangers wife's tatoo, so simple yet just awesome! Describes her tribes region. It was a series of lines under her lower lip, representing the river.

    So we headed out monday afternoon for the start of the hunt, to catch caribou. Hunting caribou in their eyes is like fishing, you catch the prey, and therefore it will return next year. It is catching, not taking, totally different meanings in eskimo!! They have a few frases that mean totally different things in english compared to eskimo! Made for some pretty funny stories!! Back on topic now. First pic is on way up to sand bar. Second is of the 6 man cabelas guide tent, which is really awesome.
    .phone 247.jpgphone 250.jpg
    From the sand bar we would glass the mountains watching for the herds of caribou flowing over the mountain tops. Usually about an hour later they would be at the rivers edge at some point looking to cross. On tuesday a few fawns were caught and then HuntAK59's first caribou ever. He was totally stoked and on the way up from Anchorage he told me he was gonna kill a double shovel caribou. I told him how rare they are, supposedly about 1 in 5,000. His first was a nice double shovel that was really symetrical. Of course will make a great european mount. I told him they come alot bigger than that one though. A nice rack is just a bonus, we were there to meat hunt. The meat happened to be on the bigger, fatter bulls that were not in rut yet, so that is what we caught. I even kept a rack as a momento from the awesome experience and to help remember the trip.

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    Member akrstabout's Avatar
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    Default Now to take you to school!

    Stranger and his wife taught us their way to clean the catch. Pretty impressive and I am sure can be applied to other animals. The skinning part can't, only really works on caribou. The gutting part can be I think. Here is the tricks! Pull the caribou back onto their racks, then tuck the front legs up under the antlers, this holds everything open when doing the gutting part.
    Instead of splitting the sternum down the middle, you score the meat on the side a few inches down, find the cartilage joints and cut through them. Score the other side on the inside then snap over, cut meat through and sternum/ part of the brisket from each side comes off as one piece. This totally opens up the rib cage clear up the throat! Much easier for pulling the innards out! Keep the heart and tounge for soup, forget the name of it, but was sure tasty! I don't have any pics to really show how to do it, was busy doing work, plus when stranger breaks your camera, I was limited to my cell phone and it was cold and dieing. Plus, usually not much into taking a lot of photos when work is to be done.
    phone 258.jpgphone 263.jpg In the second pic there in the back ground, you can see a rib cage. It is open and missing the sternum peice up to the right in the pic. Then the head gear minus 3 out of the 10 bulls caught. The rest were gonna be salvaged for an antler carver in the south east, but boats too full and no time by the time we were headed out thursday late afternoon.

    On the flight home from Kots, we sat next to a lady from Point Hope. I showed her pics of how the caribou were butchered and she couldn't believe it. They don't do it that way in Point Hope, which brings up a whole nother subject that we will not get into. But just the differences between villiages in different regions. She was exstatic about being able to describe it to her husband. Traded info with her and I thought it was cool to be passing on what we learned so quickly to another person who really wanted to learn and will help them out.
    The 3rd trick is skin the caribou by hand! You of course start all the cuts by hand, scoring the fronts of the front legs down to the hoofs, down the back of the back legs to the hoofs, and of course up the middle from tail to throat. Get the edges started down the ribs. Then put the knife down and use your hands! Just force your way down and pull back or roll the hide as you go. Reach in and around the arm pits, then pull up on the hide using the caribou's weight to skin the legs, all 4. Then you score around the ankle just above the actual joint. There is softer part of bone there, once scored all the way around to sever tendons and such, snap it over your knee and cut the remainder fleshy stuff and your done! They do it that way to be able to boil the whole bone and get the nutrition from the knee cap area and joint and then they break the bone and suck out the morrow. Never had a chance to try this.

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    Member kahahawai's Avatar
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    So thats where you been....was wondering when we'd hear from you ......good write up !!!

    Chuck

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    Member akrstabout's Avatar
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    phone 255.jpgphone 252.jpgSkipped ahead, but once caribou are caught, you tie them up with the anchor rope. We had 9 caught and no worrries, they float! You just motor up to them and tie off one by one. Now it is legal, I think one of the very few areas legal to use rimfire to kill big game. .22lr rifles mostly, steadier and best velocity of course. I was curious and wanted to use the .22lr advantage arms kit for my glock 20. It worked great, no issues at and did the job quickly just like the rifles. I also used the 10mm long slide, took along for shore hunting and bears at night mostly. We had fresh bear sign when we arrived and the next morning, black bear, and down the beach were sightings of silverback grizzly. Which took the first catch of a nice cow that monday night.
    Now back to the point. When we so lazily got up after 11am and had bulls across river about the swim across we slowly loaded up, me especially being sick the whole the time and kinda in a daze that morning. My .22lr kit was in a back pack I beleive left in the tent. We are headed to catch the caribou and HuntAK59 gives me his G20 with his .22lr kit, which at some point I had seen him drop in the sand. It fired but wouldn't load another round, hand cycled the slide a couple times and gave up after catching one. I pulled out the 10mm and proceeded to catch more. In the vid they both posted you can see the 10mm passing through the small bull an skipping across the river! Hence why it is legal to hunt with .22lr. I didn't know the bullet did that until watching the video. On thursday though stranger and his wife ferried a load down to Kiana. While they were gone two calves swam up to camp, I saw them on my way to do paper work. I crouched down and stalked to within 14yards in the willows. I had drawn the 10mm and had a bead on the first calf, but I just knew better than to fire hearing two boats coming, one from up and down river. I kept gun drawn as calfs were still unaware of my presence. As the boats were closing in, still a couple hundred yards out or more, but the boat from down river is what I didn't like. I never pulled the trigger and after seeing that video on a screen, so glad I didn't! Always trust the gut!!

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    Member tlingitwarrior's Avatar
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    Awesome.

    I thought everyone knew the "zipper" trick on the brisket. Only way to take apart an animal.
    In 1492 Native Americans discovered Columbus lost at sea
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    Member akrstabout's Avatar
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    phone 265.jpgBoat ride after a night in Kiana. Great trip. Being sick sucked but, the worse hit once I got home. Missed work and then had butchering to do. Then hanging out with fiance. Then finally have time tonight to post.
    Along with good memories and good friends was good food! We had white fish, white fish eggs, and white fish stomachs fresh saturday night from the set net! That was a treat. Then sunday having caribou ribs and beluga muk tuk, which is like eating egg whites and so delicious. Had white fish and eggs again in Kiana. The caribou heart and tounge and fresh boiled over a camp fire was most awesome and well needed on a cold night. Northern lights were breath taking and watching the satelites whiz by flashing was cool too! If I really tried I could write for a week about the conversations, sights seen and adventures had!
    Stranger was very insightful and knowledgeable on the way of the land, culture, history of both eskimos and white man, and most importantly the mosin nagants!!!!!!!!!!!!

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    Member akrstabout's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tlingitwarrior View Post
    Awesome.

    I thought everyone knew the "zipper" trick on the brisket. Only way to take apart an animal.
    Well I must have missed that memo! I am also easily facinated about the little stuff!

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    To be part of life in a different but same world can be enlightening
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

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    I think the smoothness we can pulll things off on a local level really helps. Its much the same elsewhere where we hunt simply because we are ingrained.

    Im certain it like that for most fellows, hunting fairly close to home.


    Getting two guys who just could listen and work was a major benifit, with no demands made but a wait and see additude.........that was priceless.

    This is the cut Chris is referrring to, for opening the brisket.



    Just steppin back and snappin' a pik, but you can see the guts and blood pulled and draing via former anus emplacemnet ~~LOL!!~~
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    Member akrstabout's Avatar
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    Thanks Stranger for the pics, way better than what I had. Next time though, post pics without all the gore, LOL! Awesome

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    Gore? I see sausage caseings, Heart, Liver, Bible, Kidneys, fat,..... Blood thickens the soup, too bad it got spillt.....

    Just wanted to show as you described.

    Were here to learn from each other, good and bad, its a process, and doing things with company along is a valuable experiance for everybody.
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

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    So how does one sign up for next years adventure?

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