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Thread: Specialty "Compost" for the Green house.

  1. #1
    Member mudbuddy's Avatar
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    Lightbulb Specialty "Compost" for the Green house.

    I've been saving all the kitchen scraps, eggs shells, beet, been, pea
    scraps from the freeing process & putting it in the the small compost bin.
    I was almost done & shrunk down to a tight 14" deep layer
    I even threw in some fish scraps earlier this spring. (no smell when I mixed it )

    I mixed the bin, shoveled it to on side & chopped & added the GH plants with some leaves & grass
    then sprinkled the older compost over it in layers.
    Hoping for some compost with the nutrients that the next crop of toms & cucs need & can easily get
    from the soil. Plan to add it to the soil boxes in the GH when it's done.
    1st time doing this but it seemed logical, "Green house specialty compost".
    What do yuns think? Worth the effort?
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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    I've been working on a compost batch for a year and a half now that is made solely of kitchen scraps and trimmings from the garden. I didn't do a good job of keeping it mixed the first year, but it's going well now and I hope to use some next year.

    How do you anticipate this compost being different from the other stuff you use?

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    Member mudbuddy's Avatar
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    My other compost bin (large bin) is 80% leaves & grass & 20% garden plants.
    The Specialty compost is 20% leaves & grass & 40% kitchen scraps (fruit & veggie scraps) & 40% plants that I grow in the GH (tomato & cucumber plants) where the compost will be used. (%'ages a guess but close).
    More concentrated, richer in some nutrient content?? (hopefully richer in what toms & cucs need to grow well.)
    I don't really know, but basically it is more the fruit/veggie & the plants & will use it for compost & the bigger bin is mostly plant compost.
    I don't know if the fruits & veggies/tomato & cuc plants compost will contain more nutrients that can/will be use to grow tomatoes & cucs in the GH. It seems to me that it would, but don't know.
    I mean you can buy special plant foods for roses, tomatoes, shrubs etc. Can I make compost specialized for toms & cucs by using toms & cucs to make the compost?

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    tomatoe vines and leaves are poision, niteshade family
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    Quote Originally Posted by mudbuddy View Post
    1st time doing this but it seemed logical, "Green house specialty compost".
    What do yuns think? Worth the effort?
    Totally makes sense now, but when I first read the "Specialty "Compost" for the Green house" title, I initially thought you were talking about "humanure"!

    Personally, I don't feel the need to make a separate batch, but I'm really interested in the idea of redesigning my greenhouse, so that the hot compost pile helps keep the greenhouse from freezing a bit longer in the fall. I'd probably be more inclined to make a special batch if I had more leaves, but most of what little I have becomes mulch instead of compost.

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    Member mudbuddy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seraphina View Post
    Totally makes sense now, but when I first read the "Specialty "Compost" for the Green house" title, I initially thought you were talking about "humanure"!

    Personally, I don't feel the need to make a separate batch, but I'm really interested in the idea of redesigning my greenhouse, so that the hot compost pile helps keep the greenhouse from freezing a bit longer in the fall. I'd probably be more inclined to make a special batch if I had more leaves, but most of what little I have becomes mulch instead of compost.
    Good idea if you can get the heat into the GH. I use heat tape in the bottom of the soil boxes. It help me be able to plant early (1st of April) & get a few week more in the fall.

    Don't know where you are but;
    I bet you can find some neighbors that will gladly give you bags of leaves this time of the year

    Brian:
    I bet your compost will be good stuff. You still have time to mix in some leaves & grass to heat it up one more time before it gets to cold. I added a layer of leaves & grass to the big bin 2 days ago, covered & today it was 140.

    g3: tomato plants are good to compost, just not good to eat.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by mudbuddy View Post
    Good idea if you can get the heat into the GH. I use heat tape in the bottom of the soil boxes. It help me be able to plant early (1st of April) & get a few week more in the fall.
    Yep, additional heat is needed in the spring for sure, I don't think my compost idea can help except in the fall when there's lots of post-season material available to make a big, hot pile.

    I mean you can buy special plant foods for roses, tomatoes, shrubs etc. Can I make compost specialized for toms & cucs by using toms & cucs to make the compost?
    I don't know but I don't think so. You can certainly make your own by balancing NPK and minerals to match toms' and cucs' preferences. But probably can't assume that the dead plants necessarily match those requirements.

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    Member AKFishOn's Avatar
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    Has anyone had problems with bear smelling around or digging in their compost bins? I'd like to start one but bear already chew on the sew vent caps in the yard and not sure about introducing fermenting table scraps even if they are only organic like watermelon, egg shells, coffee grounds etc...any thoughts?

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    Member mudbuddy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKFishOn View Post
    Has anyone had problems with bear smelling around or digging in their compost bins? I'd like to start one but bear already chew on the sew vent caps in the yard and not sure about introducing fermenting table scraps even if they are only organic like watermelon, egg shells, coffee grounds etc...any thoughts?
    Not "Yet" in my area. If you see bears close to where you would have the compost bin, then they'd find it.
    Although it's open season here for black bear. Don't know the F&G regs. for where you are (protection of personal property?) Don't think I need "Bear bait station signs" yet.
    I can see that in some areas near the Mts & areas with bears close by, it may be a concern.
    I keep my piles covered but a bears sense of smell is good enough to find it if they think it's easy food.
    Moose in the garden, yes; but so far no bears in the compost & I had some pretty potent fish compost cooking this summer.
    Looks like you know how to take care of a bear by your Avatar.

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    I've had black bears walk through my yard and not give a second glance to my compost bin. That being said, I only compost plants - no fish or meat products - so there's not much there for them to be interested in.

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    Member garnede's Avatar
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    Compost is only as good as what you put into it. Salt water/anadromous fish and seaweed are potentially some of the most balanced nutrient sources. With enough carbon to capture the rich nutrients I think your special compost for the greenhouse is a good idea.

    You could use compost to keep the greenhouse warm in the winter, but a better use might be to keep some grass and leaves separate and thaw/mix them in the spring to keep the green house warm thru the night. If you can get it you can use horse manure and straw to make your hot compost in the spring.

    If you do not have a green house then you can use straw bales to box in your compost pile and a window on top and make a hot frame for starting seeds in the spring. The straw holds the heat in and sends it all up to the seedlings. The window on top holds in the heat. A few perforated drain pipes on bottom and vertically help feed oxogen to keep the pile hot.
    It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

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    Lightbulb Instant compost . . .

    My wife uses a Blendtec* to instantly convert all our garbage/table scraps/whatever into either dog food or instant compost, which is poured on her planting beds. Leaves and grass clippings go on the beds as-is for mulch.

    *
    http://www.blendtec.com/

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by garnede View Post
    You could use compost to keep the greenhouse warm in the winter, but a better use might be to keep some grass and leaves separate and thaw/mix them in the spring to keep the green house warm thru the night. If you can get it you can use horse manure and straw to make your hot compost in the spring.
    Sounds like a good idea to hold the materials until spring, but in my limited experience the piles were always already decomposed before spring. How would you keep them ready to use in the spring?

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    Member garnede's Avatar
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    Bag the leaves and grass clippings separately. In a standard yard bag they do not have enough mass to not freeze. The grass clippings might get a little slimy, but will still be green after a few months in a bag. An easier method might be to go to a horse barn and collect the manure that they muck out of the stalls daily.
    It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

    http://wouldieatitagainfoodblog.blogspot.com/

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by garnede View Post
    Bag the leaves and grass clippings separately. In a standard yard bag they do not have enough mass to not freeze. The grass clippings might get a little slimy, but will still be green after a few months in a bag. An easier method might be to go to a horse barn and collect the manure that they muck out of the stalls daily.
    Thanks, I'll try bagging it and see how well it eliminates decomposition.
    As for the horses, no stables within a reasonable distance, and my coop and hutch are currently uninhabited.

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