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Thread: gefilte fish, anyone?

  1. #1
    Member steelguy's Avatar
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    Talking gefilte fish, anyone?

    Nothing for nothing, and I should mention that I religiously read everything on this forum every night, why is is that I have never read anything about catch and release of gefilte fish? I know they are not a common species in Alaska, but they sure do make a tasty quick meal, especially with a little bit of horseradish. Are they endangered or what? Work with me here.

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    Default gefilte

    is that anything like fiskeboller? Ground haddock, potato flour, nutmeg etc... I grew up on fiskeboller with white sauce and boiled potatos for breakfast.

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    Thumbs up Equal opportunity to gefilte fish. . .

    Quote Originally Posted by steelguy View Post
    . . . why is is that I have never read anything about catch and release of gefilte fish? . . . Are they endangered or what? Work with me here.
    Good grief, how long have you been in Alaska? Certain East European ethnic groups have a cultural priority on virtually all Alaska's harvestable gefilte fish, thus leaving no surplus to be devoted to the mortality of catch-and-release.

    Several groups have sponsored Board of Fish proposals seeking to redress this obvious injustice.


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    Default Gfilte fish

    Gefilte fish - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:
    In traditional recipes for gefilte fish, the fish is first deboned, often while still at the market. Next, the fish is ground into a paste along with eggs, onions and bread or matzoh meal and then stuffed back into the skin of the deboned fish, giving it the name gefilte (filled or stuffed, compare the German gefüllte). The whole stuffed fish is then poached with carrots and onions. When prepared this way, it is usually served in slices. In this way, not only could the work of picking fish bones at the table be avoided, but the quantity of fish could be extended by the added ingredients, so that each member of a family could receive a portion even if the family could not afford a large quantity of fish.

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    Member steelguy's Avatar
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    Thumbs up gefilte fish, ah yes!

    Being of Swedish ancestry, I have had the pleasure of sampling fiskeboll, as obtained from our local Ikea outlet. My four female Swedish cousins always kinda giggle at the mention of the word, I'm not sure about what, but I still think it tastes pretty much okay and eat them without shame or hesitation. I must confess though that I prefer gefilte fish, having a firmer texture. Maybe it's an acquired taste, whatever. I believe today's locally raised gefilte fish are a combination of pike and carp and are commonly bottled in either water or some kind of jell and can be caught on your local food store shelves, no license needed. I like those in water. Try it, you might like it.

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    Default

    I think I will try it. If it's good enough for a Swede, then perhaps my dog wont turn up her nose at it.

    Just a little Norwegian humor

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    Default yeah, right...

    You guys really are beginning to show signs of cabin fever. Soon somebody is actually going to try to fish for that item and then ask questions about its slot limit and technique!

    By the way, I made fish balls just last night with some of my September halibut. It is so easy and so tasty...

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    Default AlaskanAuthor

    perhaps you could share that recipe here on the forum. Sure would be a GREAT way for folks to use up old pike, cod, and halbut.

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    Smile The recipe, please. . . .

    Quote Originally Posted by cubpilot View Post
    perhaps you could share that recipe here on the forum. Sure would be a GREAT way for folks to use up old pike, cod, and halbut.

    I second that motion. . . c'mon, AA, 'fess up. . . .


  10. #10
    Member Jan from Humboldt's Avatar
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    Default Record 64 pound Gefilte fish caught...

    Record 64 Pound Gefilte Fish Caught in Minnesota Lake
    by Samuel Shinewald



    With records nearly shattered each day during this year's hyper-competitive Gefilte Fishing season, it should come as no surprise to avid sport-fishing fans that veteran Gefilte Fisherman Eli Kozlowski finally smashed a two thousand six hundred and thirteen year old record, catching a 64 pound Gefilte along the shorelines of Lake Anakatan in Central Minnesota. With descendants of former record holder Shimon Ben Ur of Babylonia on hand, Kozlowski lifted the Giant Gefilte from the water and placed it in a bathtub full of jellied broth. "I reeled and reeled and barely broke a sweat," Eli said. "Even for a Gefilte, she was a spineless beast".
    Eli displayed the Gefilte briefly for a photo-op, before his wife, Deborah, carved the record-breaker into 148 balls, placing 296 carrot slices, leaves of lettuce and cherry tomatoes alongside. Those watching the competition were in awe. "I was there when Barry Bonds hit his 73rd," said avid sports fan Michael Tamowitz. "I was in the stands when Gretzky scored his 894th goal, and was in the audience when Mike Tyson bit off Evander Holyfield's ear. I knew that I had to be here to see this mammoth Gefilte get scooped out of the water so I could share it with my children - and it was every bit as magical. We may never see a Gefilte as magnificent as this ever again." Tamowitz's youngest son Danny, wearing a Manischevitz shirt and hat, could not contain his exuberance and admiration, "When I grow up, I want to be just like Eli, but I want to smell less like fish".
    Yet, Kozlowski's was not without his critics; Greenpeace, a long time foe of Sport Gefilte Fishing, issued a statement decrying the catch, stating, "We call for an all out ban on Gefilte-Fishing. The Giant Gefilte Population has dwindled to dangerous lows and a miracle of nature has been caught, slaughtered and served with Chrain (horseradish). This is nothing to celebrate."
    In response, Kozlowki said that he undeterred by his detractors, and is simply taking some time to savor his sweet achievement. When asked what he plans on doing next, Kozlowski responded, "I'm going after any and every record that will make my people proud. Next, I plan on baking the world's largest latke."

  11. #11
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    Default great humor/great taste

    Fish Balls

    Use deboned skinned white flesh.
    Blast in a food procesor until a soft paste.
    Remove to a large mxing bowl.
    Add finely chopped celery and onion.
    Sprinkle in dill weed.
    Crack in a couple of raw eggs.
    Add unsesoned bread crumbs and firm up the extire mix until it reaches a paste that you can form into golf ball sized portions.

    Drop all the balls into a large kettle of boiling water in a well ventilated area.
    The balls will sink.
    When they rise, shut off the pot, cover, and let steep for 10 minutes.
    Drain and cool.

    Variations:

    Add the balls to fine chicken stock for a great soup.
    Chill the balls and serve cold with horseradish as an appetizer.
    Layer the balls on top of noodles and seve covered with your favorite white sauce as your main course.
    Pack them into your favoite sweet pickling solution and chill for a week as a snack from the jar.

    And finally, throw them at the screwball who started this thread...

    http://www.alaskanauthor.com

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    Thumbs up Thanks. . .

    Thanks, AA, sounds like fun. I've cut, pasted, and stored it to a recipe file. Any reason it wouldn't work as well with salmon?


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    Thumbs up Thanks. . .

    Thanks, AA, sounds like fun. I've cut, pasted, and stored it to a recipe file. Any reason it wouldn't work as well with salmon?


  14. #14
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    Exclamation All I gotta say . . .

    all I gotta say: "oiy veh"

  15. #15

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    Don't forget to put in fresh ground black pepper and some sugar. My grandmother usually makes it with store bought whitefish and then she mixes that with whatever we are catching.....pike, smallmouth bass, walleye, or trout and it all comes out good. The only issue with salmon is that it just wouldn't taste like gefilte fish (a stronger taste), but that does not mean that it would not be good.

  16. #16

    Default

    i almost forgot one of the most important parts...u grind up a section of fish bones (this adds lots of taste).

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