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Thread: Way Beyond Catch-and-release. . .

  1. #1
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    Wink Way Beyond Catch-and-release. . .

    For those who think catch-and-release is the ultimate in responsible angling and for those who don't practice c&r for ethical reasons, consider Touch-and-Go angling as described by Ted Kerasote in the sentences below:


    His voice becomes reflective. He's getting to the denouement, what really counts for him. "The reason I've stayed with catch and release is-it's not the fight. It's seeing the fish come up, sip the fly. Just to see that. It's pretty neat. Being in Yellowstone is being part of the ecosystem, watching the flies dimple the water, looking at the sky. I don't go to fight them. I go to join them."

    If that's it-just wanting to be part of things as Williams and the rest of us have claimed-why not clip off the bend of the hook and simply cast the harmless fly?

    John Betts, the renowned fly tier and angling scholar, not only thought of the question before I did, he thought of the answer. Disturbed by the small but inevitable percentage of trout injured while being released, Betts began to fish with flies from which the hook bends had been cut. Trout would rise to these hookless flies three, four, even half a dozen times. Damage to the fish was zero, but Betts was disappointed. "Missing was the adrenaline surge that came from the anticipation, take, and initial runs and jumps," he wrote in American Angler, a journal devoted to flyfishing and fly-tying.

    Still needing some connection with the fish, albeit brief, Betts started to tie "tag" hooks, standing for "touch and go." They have a ringed eye at both ends. The business end can't penetrate the fish's mouth but will hold the fish long enough for the angler to feel it on the end of his or her line, see it jump, maybe even get a run or two out of it. "My need to touch whatever I've caught," Betts reflected, "originated in lessons learned millions of years ago for reasons other than sport. Touching is one of the last vestiges of our past and may now seem our only way to keep in contact with it. It also provides a sense of validity for ourselves at the moment and later, when we tell others about what we've done. My need to touch is now tempered by the realization that resources are limited and that what I touch is becomingly increasingly scarce."

    —from "Catch and Deny," Heart of Home 2003 by Ted Kerasote


  2. #2

    Default no pics

    Yeah, but you don't have a picture to take home. That's the thing that means the most to me. You might eat a few meals off the fish, but the real value is the picture of the 11 year old with the 5 pound rainbow.
    Hike faster. I hear banjo music.

  3. #3
    New member overmywaders's Avatar
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    Default I'll go you one better

    Marcus,

    I have an article on Catch & Release on my blog and website that is generating a lot of interest. It is by a credible Alaskan writer who questions the underpinnings of C&R. See http://www.overmywaders.com/cblog for "At What Cost?"

    This is my first time on your forum, but I've around looked a bit and you folks seem moderately sane; the odd touch of cabin fever, but nothing life-threatening -- yet.

    Nice place you've got here. Thanks.

    With warmest regards,
    Reed

    http://www.overmywaders.com

    HTML Code:
    <a href="http://www.overmywaders.com/cblog><i>The Contemplative Angler</i> Blog</a>

  4. #4

    Default cat fishing

    I used to go "sight cat fishing" when I was a kid. Ostensibly, this was to improve my casting with my new baitcasting bass reel. I would tie monofilament directly to the head of a plastic worm and cast it into my neighbors lawn. Sure was fun to watch his cat stalk and then pounce on the twitching worm!
    "The Gods do not subtract from the allotted span of men's lives the hours spent in fishing" Assyrian Tablet 2000 B.C.

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    Default cats

    haven't tried the cats, but F&G mad at me one day doin the same thing w/ seagulls on the beach @ deep creek. officer got real mad when an eagle swooped down and picked up the herring, never have heard a little zebco scream out line so fast. needless to say we stopped

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    Default

    Hello, my name is Yukon and I enjoy fishing.

    I enjoy preparing, the anticipation when the alarm clock goes off. I like the "smell" of the early morning and seeing the sun light up the early morning fog. I love to watch the tips of the rods dance with the wiggle of the perfectly running kwikfish, or the slow constant tug of a diver with eggs, or feeling the bump of the lead on the bottom of the river, feeling every rock waiting for that magical "rock" that doesn't bounce, it gets heavy almost if it hung on the bottom but it is coming with you ever so slightly.
    I get a rush everytime the rod slams to the water with a king salmon on the other end, running down river as if the screaming drag was a slight hinderance. The yell of "fish-on" the rush to clear the lines and catch up with the fish. The constant power of the king of salmon with runs that you don't even try to stop, just minimize. Chasing a king across the river, the excitement when it breaks the surface, knowing that is an opportunity to loose a fish. Seeing that fish gives me the chills every time. Then you finally get it close to the boat, it gives you an opportunity to net it, but you know it is still too early, do you risk losing it and wait for the next circle by the boat? You decide to wait, knowing you will kick youself if you lose the fish after passing up an opportunity to net the fish. You are holding the net, shaking, you look at the rod tip and see it shaking as well, knowing the fish is not doing it the angler is getting nervous.
    Finally, the King of kings circles around by the boat, its head is in the perfect position to dip the net under it, here it comes, you drop the net in the water and the king swims to the bottom of the net, you bag the net and the king is yours.
    Do you keep it or let it go? The question goes through you mind, it is a beautiful fish, your excitement is uncontrollable as you let out an excited yell, other fishermen around you are clapping and smiling, perhaps a little jealous but happy for you non-the-less.

    The fish is there in the net, the hook hanging out the corner of its mouth, it is absolutely beautiful, but it also tastes so good.

    The choice is yours..........and only yours

  7. #7
    New member overmywaders's Avatar
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    Default

    Okay, the plastic worm is not how I visualized Alaskan fishing. I thought it was more like http://www.overmywaders.com/SALMON1.MPG or http://www.youtube.com/v/OiN0Ru6vQDw or even the Kiwi way http://www.overmywaders.com/fishing.mpeg

    Down here in the states we focus on this http://www.conknet.com/~b_bull/special/chickenfishing.html


    Best regards,
    Reed

    http://www.overmywaders.com

    http://www.overmywaders.com/cblog

  8. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by overmywaders View Post
    Okay, the plastic worm is not how I visualized Alaskan fishing. I thought it was more like http://www.overmywaders.com/SALMON1.MPG or http://www.youtube.com/v/OiN0Ru6vQDw or even the Kiwi way http://www.overmywaders.com/fishing.mpeg

    Down here in the states we focus on this http://www.conknet.com/~b_bull/special/chickenfishing.html


    Best regards,
    Reed

    http://www.overmywaders.com

    http://www.overmywaders.com/cblog
    Know I know first hand what the acronym LMAO really stands for! Great videos! By the way, the plastic worm was in San Diego, up here the cats are too smart, gotta use a real salmon to get'em to pounce!
    "The Gods do not subtract from the allotted span of men's lives the hours spent in fishing" Assyrian Tablet 2000 B.C.

  9. #9
    Member Rick P's Avatar
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    Default

    Nickster I used to fish for the X-Wfie's cats as a way of keeping my cast in tune and relieving some of the late winter cabin fever. Used the tip section only and a hookless egg patern indoors, great fun seeing if you can cast around the couch and not get yelled at for knocking stuff of the coffe table.

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    Default

    Be sure to listen to our official state balladeer Hobo Jim's great song "Fishing for Chickens" to get in the right frame of mind before trolling through the bushes. Its not a new thing in Alaska!!

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    Wink Giant chickens. . . .

    Quote Originally Posted by gusdog44 View Post
    Be sure to listen to our official state balladeer Hobo Jim's great song "Fishing for Chickens" to get in the right frame of mind before trolling through the bushes. Its not a new thing in Alaska!!

    Indeed it isn't. Though as I understand it, the "fishin' for chickens" movement is having trouble figuring out how to deal with the fishNaddicted-to-giant-kings crowd.

    Someone has suggested "fishin'-for-turkeys"? Heavens, what a "rush," what a "sense of conquest" that would be. . .


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    Default

    Someone has suggested "fishin'-for-turkeys"? Heavens, what a "rush," what a "sense of conquest" that would be. . .

    [/SIZE][/FONT]
    Now that sounds like it should be a Thanksgiving tradition

  13. #13

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    Yukon,

    Cheers to you! I like actually fishing too! Maybe some of the folks that are anti on this forum should spend more time elsewhere.I thought it was for fishing, not bashing fisherman.

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    Thanks fishguy, only half a dozen posts later before someone said, "Hey, I actually like fishing"
    It must be a long winter this year. Read some of these threads and it seems as if I should feel guilty because I like to go fishing, maybe keep some, maybe let some go, heck, maybe not even catch one at all. But either way I enjoy the all aspects of fishing, even love fishing the Kenai. Even though the some on this board make it seem like a bad place to fish.

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    Yukon and fishguy I'm with you too.....I really enjoy all aspects of fishing from spending the day with friends to eating a fresh salmon.....or hot dogs when I have my usual luck!!!

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    Thumbs up Me too. . .

    gusdog, yukon, and fishguy—count me in too! I love fishing and have been doing it for over 60 years. Hey, when I started, fly lines were designated GBH etc., we tied our own tapered leaders, there was no such thing as a free-spool or spinning reel, and plugs were made of wood.

    Now I have the pleasure of teaching my grandchildren.


  17. #17

    Default I wouldn't spend so much time on this forum if I didn't love fishing!

    Quote Originally Posted by fishguy View Post
    Yukon,

    Cheers to you! I like actually fishing too! Maybe some of the folks that are anti on this forum should spend more time elsewhere.I thought it was for fishing, not bashing fisherman.
    From making plans in the winter to pulling out a halibut steak or some smoked salmon from the freezer the following winter, I love it all! THE FISHING is THE REASON I moved to Alaska six years ago. Casting for cats (hookless, of course) when I can't be on the water sort of implies my degree of obsession. My wife sometimes catches me making a hook-setting motion while wandering aimlessly around the living room with nothing in my hands. In my mind, I'm on the river, or out at Montague, or....well, you name it, but there's a fish biting!
    "The Gods do not subtract from the allotted span of men's lives the hours spent in fishing" Assyrian Tablet 2000 B.C.

  18. #18
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    Default It's a good thing to discuss ethics

    Been out and about and busy of late, not much time on the forum lately.

    Saw this post and want to commend John Nelson for his article, At What Cost?, that was posted by Reed (overmywaders).
    http://www.overmywaders.com/cblog/

    Also want to commend Yukon for his post too, the last line of which was "the choice is yours...and only yours."

    It's a good thing to be able to rationally discuss fishing ethics, and how things got to be the way they are, and where they are going. Yes, I've got friends (good friends) who practice C&R fishing, though I personally won't participate in that endeavor. We sit around the campfire too and discuss it without ending up disrespecting or hating one another. There are many facets to the increasing demand on a finite supply of fish in any given area. As the demand for opportunity goes up, and managers try to meet that demand in the sport fishery, it doesn't take a rocket scientist to intuit that it's likely C&R-only fisheries will expand. It's another allocation dilemma that goes way beyond just the "ethics" of Catch-and-Release. Near large urban areas where there is access to popular streams, C&R-only fisheries have expanded. Not just for salmon but for many species. Frankly I fear the day when some of us won't be able to catch and eat a grayling or salmon, and for those of us who won't participate in C&R fisheries, for in the end we have no "choice" at all. We will never again see the fish in the net, never again have the opportunity to enjoy fishing the way we believe it was meant to be. Something to think on, and I mean that respectfully to all.
    Sincerely,

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    Smile Don't lose hope. . .

    Quote Originally Posted by bushrat View Post
    Frankly I fear the day when some of us won't be able to catch and eat a grayling or salmon, and for those of us who won't participate in C&R fisheries, for in the end we have no "choice" at all.
    Take heart, Mark, John McPhee may prove prophetic . . . .

    "If I were strolling through the annals of incorrectness—up past the invertible heroism of General Custer and on through the safaris of Dennis Finch-Hatton—I would expect to discern, out there in the future, catch-and-release fishing," —John McPhee



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