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Thread: Cupboards and counter tops

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    Member AKFishOn's Avatar
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    Default Cupboards and counter tops

    I was thinking of making my own cupboards and cabinets for the cabin out of mostly Cedar. The deal I could get is on some nice 1x4s so I was thinking of either joining with disks or making T&G with it in the wood shop. Anyone ever done something like this. What ever I do it will be solid wood with no veneer or plywood.

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    Member thewhop2000's Avatar
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    Super grade AC finish plywood with veneer on the edges works well also. I worked Maintenance on Ft rich for over five years and when I needed to replace cabinets doors or such, it worked well. We had to make our own due to the existing stuff being too old to find a replacement to order. The veneer I am talking about is in a roll and you iron it on, along the edges and then sand smooth, not the sheets
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    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    All bisquits or TNG add is alignment. The glue joint on properly edge jointed glue up will be stronger at the glue joint than anywhere else on the plank. I'm not a big fan of using cedar on anything that sees much use. It's awful soft for everyday use.
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    Member thewhop2000's Avatar
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    I agree with doug, go another route!!!! As for ceder, I put it on to sit there, not to be used as a swing board. Like in siding or moth closets. Too soft to be a hardy type of wood to see use like a cabinet.
    If a dipnetter dips a fish and there is no one around to see/hear it, Did he really dip?

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    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    I have tried making my own T&G for my ceiling. It is a painstaking process. I quit after a couple hundred board feet that too too long to install.

    You could make the boxes out of plywood, then make the facing out of pine or cedar. If you have a shaper or router table, you could make the doors or drawer fronts. All it takes is time...... and tools...... and more time......
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    Member Gerberman's Avatar
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    A third on the softness of cedar, it does not hold nails well and screws will strip out to easy. Works great for trim or covering but hard to seal for ctops or cupboards, to soft, dents easily. I have used it for wall covering and it is hard to get shelves to go up well without hitting a stud. If you use it for trim, glue the corners that are exposed to traffic. Cedar looks great but does not hold up to abuse. Good luck.

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    Member cdubbin's Avatar
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    Nothing wrong with cedar for interior work; I lived in a cabin once that had some very nice rustic cedar cabinets and panelling. Sand it to 180 or so, and put on a light coat of water-based finish. Remember the rule of working with solid wood; it will move, no matter what you do, so let it! With proper techniques, cedar will last forever. There is no such thing as conventional woodworking-it's a medium that begs for creativity and self expression. Make some sawdust and have fun!
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    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    You might consider using a Kreg joint system. I have one and it is awesome, way better than dowels or biscuits. Made this corner cabinet using it and several other projects.

    http://www.kregjoint.com/

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    Smile Suggestions . . .

    Are you talking about red (aromatic) cedar or Western cedar? Red cedar would, to my mind, be the better of the two for making cabinets. Neither would be suitable for counter-tops . . too soft and too much cross-grain movement, but either would work for the cabinets and face-frames with proper joinery.

    I assume you're thinking of building cabinets as boxes made up of glued-up 1" X 4"s and applying a face-frame? That would work if you make sure the grain runs the same way around the cabinet carcass. A glued-up, 24" wide panel is going to move, shrinking and expanding with the seasons. You'd have to make sure the grain in all carcass sides runs the same.

    The other option is to make up the cabinets "in place" where the guts/skeleton of the cabinets are made up of 1" X 4"s attached to existing walls and floor and then faced with 1" X 2" rails and stiles. Here's a description from another forum:

    I build in place, no boxes at all.
    I start with 1X4 framing in a floor support the width of the cabinet minus
    the kickspace, joists front to back and a 1X4 forming the back of the
    kickspace..
    Then I add a ply floor the depth of the cabinet minus the face.
    Then a 2X4 or 1X4 along the wall to support the top.
    If I need dividers or drawer support, they are next.
    Then the face frame, usually glued and pocket screwed together.
    Then a few 1X from front to back to stabilze the face frame and add support
    for the top.
    Then the top, pocket screwed to the wall support and face frame.
    The bottom edge of the face frame hangs 3/4" below the floor.
    A 3/4X3/4 cleat is screwed to the back of the face frame and the floor ply
    is screwed to it from above...could be glued and nailed.
    This all becomed a strong and simple structure, with minimal work and
    material.
    Also, go to this site: http://books.google.com/books?id=vTV...page&q&f=false

    and scroll down to pages 91-93 for an illustrated idea of how to do it.


    Hope that helps . . .

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    Member AKFishOn's Avatar
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    I was thinking of making the cabinets per your last description. I'm not sure the specifics of the wood but it is at Lowes and Home Depot in WA for cheap and I can take enough up to AK in a few flights for free as baggage. This will allow me to make the faces, as to the counter top I'm going to go with a solid surface counter, with cedar underneath. The Cedar they have here appears to be pretty hard (stuff decks are made of). Thanks for all the replies.

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