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Thread: Driving down to Lower 48 in 2WD vehicle and 20 ft trailer in November

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    Default Driving down to Lower 48 in 2WD vehicle and 20 ft trailer in November

    Ok any advice here? My car is a 99 ford expedition 5.4 triton 2wd.

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    Member TWB's Avatar
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    Yeh leave ASAP before you face ice and snow!!
    We do not go to the green woods and crystal waters to rough it, we go to smooth it. We get it rough enough at home; in towns and cities; in shops, offices, stores, banks anywhere that we may be placed

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    Member Rock_skipper's Avatar
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    If you wait for November your gonna have to travel through some snow from here to Dawson at least.

    You say thats an Expedtion? Did'nt all them come with 4-wheel drive? Don't know, just curious.

    How much of a load will you have on the trailer?

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    I will be pulling around 4-5klbs. I'm leaving Mid November, would I need tire chains? Tried telling the Army traveling in the winter can be pretty dangerous, but didn't work out. So I have to leave Mid November. Is there more than one way to make it down there? I would take the fairy, but the Army wont pay for my trailer to go on the fairy. So gonna drive my ass and all my stuff down south.

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    You should be okay as long as your aren't in a hurry. You do want to have chains just in case, especially with only 2WD. There is only one main way down if you insist on driving. If you are unsure of wanting to take on the risk, I would sping for the ferry. Probably not all that much more expensive considering fuel costs for somethine like an Expedition. If driving, there are a couple of options along the way, but if you are headed through Seattle essentially, stick to the Alaska Highway, don't try the Cassiar. It is a beautiful road, but fewer amenities if you need them and not as traveled if you need help along the way. Make sure to have plenty of warm clothes with you in case you get stuck or stop for any reason in the middle of nowhere.

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    sweat thanks, I burn about 9-10 MPG, 30gallon tank. anyone know the distance between each gas station?

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    Quote Originally Posted by CombatSalmon View Post
    sweat thanks, I burn about 9-10 MPG, 30gallon tank. anyone know the distance between each gas station?
    Probably the best resource would be to pick up a copy of the Milepost. This is a book that is written and revised every year specifically for the Alaska Highway. It has every stop along the way, locations of gas stations, rest stops (although most will be closed that time of year), sites to see (such as Llaird Hotsprings), etc...

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    Sound advice from anchskier, price out the ferry as an option. Compare that with the gas saved, unless the army is paying for all of your gas.

    If you drive, do you really want to haul the whole 2 1/2 tons of stuff with you, or can you sell some of the heaviest items? Some used stuff sells better up here, and is cheaper to replace down there.

    Remember to search older threads from the Relocating forum for a list of what to bring on your journey. Good luck!

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    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
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    Since you are moving out of state I assume you have driven that vehicle in snow and ice before now so you should not have any issues. Towing the trailer might be the only thing new to you in those conditions but it is just about the same just go a little slower and don't stop at the bottom of hills keep that momentum going.

    I have made the drive a couple of times in the winter once on the Casiar like mentioned don't go that route. The last time was on the Alcan which was maintained way better than the Casiar plus it has a lot more roadside ammenities like has been mentioned.

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    Problem with relying on the Milepost, or any other guide, is determining what fuel sources are available in winter. A lot of the summer season gas stations close in winter. Probably not as many as years ago, but still a bunch of the ones in northern Canada do, I'd bet. Personally, I would buy the Milepost, plot out where to buy fuel, and make some phone calls to verify their open season. I'd also pack a few cans of gas.

    Make sure your cell phone works in Canada.

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    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Strutz View Post
    Problem with relying on the Milepost, or any other guide, is determining what fuel sources are available in winter. A lot of the summer season gas stations close in winter. Probably not as many as years ago, but still a bunch of the ones in northern Canada do, I'd bet. Personally, I would buy the Milepost, plot out where to buy fuel, and make some phone calls to verify their open season. I'd also pack a few cans of gas.

    Make sure your cell phone works in Canada.
    Jim you bring up some good points. I went through Canada in late Oct a few years ago and noticed a lot more stations were open in the winter and the ones I stopped at that were not had 24 hour pumps as long as you had a debit/credit card. It was nice to see those changes!

    Yes always carry a fuel can full of fuel.

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    cool thanks, I would take the fairy, but I have to pay out of pocket for it. If I drive the Army will pay for my gas. Weird right...Ferry is like 3k with car and trailer.

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    Supporting Member Old John's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Strutz View Post
    Problem with relying on the Milepost, or any other guide, is determining what fuel sources are available in winter. A lot of the summer season gas stations close in winter. Probably not as many as years ago, but still a bunch of the ones in northern Canada do, I'd bet. Personally, I would buy the Milepost, plot out where to buy fuel, and make some phone calls to verify their open season. I'd also pack a few cans of gas.

    Make sure your cell phone works in Canada.
    It's been a couple years since I looked at a MILEPOST but I believe it used to state what facilities were open year round and which were not...

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    Quote Originally Posted by CombatSalmon View Post
    sweat thanks, I burn about 9-10 MPG, 30gallon tank. anyone know the distance between each gas station?
    Carry two 5 gallon gas cans, keep them always full, and you'll be fine.

    Don't slide off of the roadway; sometimes its like 30 feet down to the Tundra.

    Keep a warmie sleeping bag close by, at least, just in case.

    Watch out for moose and bison in the roadway.

    Good luck, and happy travels!

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    Member ironartist's Avatar
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    "WARNING" don't think your going to save miles on the kaziar,, might shave some time in the summer but winter and the distance between fuel stops are few and far between
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    tried google mapping my map, but it keeps pointing me through Cassier hwy

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    Quote Originally Posted by CombatSalmon View Post
    tried google mapping my map, but it keeps pointing me through Cassier hwy
    When you look at the Google map, you can click on and drag the part of the route over to the road you want to use. Just grab the portion along the Cassier and drag it back to the Alaska Highway and it will recalibrate.

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    Have a tire iron handy to check all the lugnuts on your trucks wheels and trailer wheels after you stop somewhere. I know of a few people who had Kanuckistani's loosen the lugnuts so they fall off a few miles after a rest stop. Be prepared to kiss up majorly when you cross the border; it'll be a toss-up as to who is the worst border-thugs.
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    Take tire chains. I get about the same mileage and have made the trip several times and my fuel tank is smaller. After September the only long gas stretch is over Pink MTN so don't skip any stations there. I fill up in Glennallen, Tok, Boarder City, Haines, Whitehorse, Watson Lake then I dump in 15 gallons that I carry in cans, then Fort Nelson the rest f the trip seems to get cheaper in prices so fill up when you can.

  20. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nitroman View Post
    Have a tire iron handy to check all the lugnuts on your trucks wheels and trailer wheels after you stop somewhere. I know of a few people who had Kanuckistani's loosen the lugnuts so they fall off a few miles after a rest stop. Be prepared to kiss up majorly when you cross the border; it'll be a toss-up as to who is the worst border-thugs.
    In multiple trips, i've never had any issues at all with the border people, either side. They have always been friendly and efficient, except for the time I had to walk in to let them know that I was there (middle of the night). If you have a dog, they often even have treats on hand for them. My parents dog would always get excited when they came up to the border station. If you have a pet, you will want to make sure to have the paperwork in line (vet check near the time of travel).

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