Results 1 to 15 of 15

Thread: New Copperhead 18 HP videos.

  1. #1
    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Delta Junction
    Posts
    4,078

    Default New Copperhead 18 HP videos.

    Nice to see the new motor in action. I will be testing the 18 hp. model this spring and really put it through the country like I did with my 12 hp. It's kinda like shoes, you can't just have one pair.....same thing with the Copperheads, they're gems. The 18 hp. will be tested with my upcoming 22 ft. canoe sometime in the spring.

    The other video is of the Copperhead folks putting a 206 cc baker racing engine on their little 6.5hp frame. Of course......you could do this in real life if yah wanted to. You'd just have to bolt a baker to your 6.5hp frame. I'm not sure about reliability but man.....that little puppy sings!

    http://bakerracingengines.com/bakerengine.shtml




  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Whitehorse, Yukon
    Posts
    431

    Default

    Very interesting concept. I am sorely tempted! Would be great for getting up the little tributaries were moose live.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Sandpoint, ID
    Posts
    1,971

    Default

    That's what we called "airboat" country in Florida...the bayou boys like to play IN the mud rather than skimming over the top! Wonder what the HP is on the Baker?

  4. #4
    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Delta Junction
    Posts
    4,078

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by North61 View Post
    Very interesting concept. I am sorely tempted! Would be great for getting up the little tributaries were moose live.
    The 18 horse would be perfect for your canoe. Because canoes are relatively slow, and these motors have far more torque than traditional outboards, it would work great with your canoe. Gill gears these motors to push big props. He also uses an expensive prop made by Hopkins. After an entire season hitting rocks that would normally break the blades of an aluminum prop (or bend the blades over), I just filed mine smooth and it's amazing that this prop has taken ZERO damage. good for skinny gravel creeks and shallow rocky rivers.

  5. #5
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    730

    Default

    mainer ... What is the size of the prop Gil is assigning to the Copperhead 18hp? And will the V-twin of the 18hp be more vibration free than the 12hp?

    I'm using an 11x10 prop initially on my MB Mini 23, with a 12.25" prop as backup, to go on MB next Spring. Fun to experiment. But, as far as I'm concerned, I like having someone like you "prove" the 18hp Copperhead before I spend my dust on an unproven motor. Thanks.

  6. #6
    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Delta Junction
    Posts
    4,078

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick View Post
    mainer ... What is the size of the prop Gil is assigning to the Copperhead 18hp? And will the V-twin of the 18hp be more vibration free than the 12hp?

    I'm using an 11x10 prop initially on my MB Mini 23, with a 12.25" prop as backup, to go on MB next Spring. Fun to experiment. But, as far as I'm concerned, I like having someone like you "prove" the 18hp Copperhead before I spend my dust on an unproven motor. Thanks.
    Vibration isn't bad with the 12 hp. Runs pretty smooth and I love that when I pull the cord, it ALWAYS starts first pull. that's important when I aim that boat at a fast chute of water and jump in the boat to throttle down. Going outside in 29 degree weather and starting that bad-boy makes for a good bet. I did it with FamilyMan......he sees it start first pull but he or my lady complains: "Do you have to do that everyday!?" As far as vibration, you always have to check the prop for rough edges, check bushings/bearing, grease things up good, and make sure all is well. If all is well, no bad vibration at all.

    I keep hearing about folks not being able to get their electric starter to kick over with the larger mud buddy mini and that worries me a bit.....as I really like yanking the motor over and not having to have battery problems that do exist like forum member jklingel and others have mentioned on this forum.. As far as "proving" the motor, I'm not too worried and am confident it'll run like a champ. Kandik has told me about the flawless performance of his 18 horse motor on this mud buddy mini, so that shouldn't be an issue, I already know the Copperhead frame is tough as nails as I've proven that.

    I'm not exactly sure which prop they went with but my 12 horse runs the 11" by 10 pitch Hopkins prop and that has been spot on with gearing, prop size, and load hauling. The 18 horse with Gill's gearing will probably push an equal or larger size prop to what the 12 horse runs I'm certain. I hope to stay with the 11" diameter prop exclusively for my boats though, because in shallow water, anything larger might be pushing it. So when you say spending your dust, does that mean that you're buying another motor?

    I don't want my 12 horse collecting too much dust, but next season, I will head back out for an extended length remote trip for another 60 days with my up-coming 22ft. model. I will bring my 12 horse as a back up (just the motor) when I test the 18 horse.

  7. #7
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    730

    Default

    mainer ...

    Jon had that MB for a year before he tried to start it. I gather he had to replace the solenoid. And they still have pull start, anyway. Like to hear a report from him about his experience with his HB/MB combo this season.

    As far as buying another motor ... Once I sell my 15 Yamaha 2 stroke, I'm going to buy a 5hp Honda, as a back up motor. Don't ever want to have to paddle or row very far, should shist happen. And I do like to explore.

    I'll consider another surface-drive in the future if there appears to be a demonstrated advantage. I do like my gear. I'm particularly interested in the concept of lighter weight frames, assuming they are durable and rugged as the MBMini's. I've been building dog sled out of aluminum tubing, bar stock with aluminum runners since 1994. There are many grades/tempers for different purposes. Not all alum. is created equal. The best , strongest alloys can be used in thinner wall at greater efficiency. A lighter frame has to leave out something by dimension or use less material. I don't think any other materials may be appropriate for s-d frames at this time. But I do enjoy seeing new technologies mature. Industry has had 100 years to perfect the outboard, producing the great motors we have today. And the surface-drives are little more than a decade old. In 10 or 15 years they might even look pretty and be somewhat quiet.

    I'd like to hear from other Alaskans or Yukoners (or mainers) who are using s-d motors. I know that the Go-Devil man (Stewart, I believe) has much experience. the Boat Shop here sold Pro-Drives for a while. They weren't lightweights. One of the people there told me that two years in a row, his Pro-Drive failed - one year broke a belt, and the other, broken the final drive. On the MudBuddy forum I saw a posting from Moosehunter, from North Pole who was waiting on one of the large block motors for his rig. So there are people around here, doing interesting things, who have information and experience we could learn from.

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    6,031

    Thumbs up every day.... yep!

    Quote Originally Posted by mainer_in_ak View Post
    with FamilyMan......he sees it start first pull but he or my lady complains: "Do you have to do that everyday!?"
    I'm pretty sure that "pull start it everyday" thing is more related to that motor's owner, than any issue that that motor needs.

    My neighbors have been asking if I've "sold that huge lawnmower" that I used to own... Though they never did figure out why I had to cut a little patch of lawn EVERY day!

    On the left side of the cool spectrum you got your chirpy little 2 strokes. In the center you got your 4 stroke outboards. And pegged to the highest setting on the cool spectrum you find the Copperhead. I love the sound of it.

  9. #9

    Default

    Regarding the electric start on mud buddy SD's not always working: Maybe I'm lucky,but I have well over 100 hrs
    on my 18 hp and it's always started perfectly.

  10. #10
    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Delta Junction
    Posts
    4,078

    Default

    That's always good to know. Having well over a hundred hours accumulated on my Copperhead frame, and realizing how much time you've put on your motor, it'll be a strong running set-up for sure. Biggest problem so far.....I think my left arm is now slightly larger than my right if yah know what I mean! It's a work out running these torque monsters.

  11. #11
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    730

    Default

    Hey mainer ...

    Tried to send you a PM, but the system wouldn't let me. Will try again tomorrow. Perhaps your in box is full.

    Rick

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Whitehorse, Yukon
    Posts
    431

    Default

    On the copper head website they go only up to 12. Is the 18 a proto-type? Any idea of weight and when they might come out?

    Quote Originally Posted by mainer_in_ak View Post
    The 18 horse would be perfect for your canoe. Because canoes are relatively slow, and these motors have far more torque than traditional outboards, it would work great with your canoe. Gill gears these motors to push big props. He also uses an expensive prop made by Hopkins. After an entire season hitting rocks that would normally break the blades of an aluminum prop (or bend the blades over), I just filed mine smooth and it's amazing that this prop has taken ZERO damage. good for skinny gravel creeks and shallow rocky rivers.

  13. #13
    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Delta Junction
    Posts
    4,078

    Default

    they've already come out. website hasn't been updated yet. One 18 horse already made it's way to AK. It's only about 10 lbs. heavier than the 12. The 12 has more hole-shot and about equal speed, but the 18 horse has more upper end torque with a load.

  14. #14
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    730

    Default

    mainer ...

    I've seen references to "hole shot" elsewhere. I assume it refers to acceleration from a standing start. Why is that important for our utilitarian uses. Most of the videos I've seen show S-D motors being used in a "go-faster" or hotrod manner. Why, for our use, is "hole shot" important?

  15. #15
    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Delta Junction
    Posts
    4,078

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick View Post
    mainer ...

    I've seen references to "hole shot" elsewhere. I assume it refers to acceleration from a standing start. Why is that important for our utilitarian uses. Most of the videos I've seen show S-D motors being used in a "go-faster" or hotrod manner. Why, for our use, is "hole shot" important?
    When I'm meandering my way through a class lll boulder garden (which I do), hole shot does help scoot me to a sharp turn left, passing through the narrow passage between rocks, and then a sharp right with full power to narrowly escape wrapping my heavily loaded canoe around another boulder only inches behind my canoe, all the while the current is fighting me.

    Hole shot also helps when lining up on a tight turn (slowly) and then picking up speed as fast as possible at a narrow passage of fast water between two rock ledges. The hole-shot of my copperhead has been very noticeable compared to the old Tohatsu I used to run......makes snappy low-end grunt and maneuvering.

    Since the 1980's, I think I'm the only freighter canoe to have gone through that class lll section of whitewater, verified by the the two locals that live above it, and the members on this forum that I've talked to who haven't gone past that section.

    Hole shot also helps with getting you off a shallow silt or sand bars. The thrust does help when grounded out. I once made to sharp of a turn while the fast current caught my skeg and almost ripped the tiller handle out of my hand. The side of my heavily loaded canoe went up on a rock in a section of whitewater. I throttled down as fast as I could, we went right over the top of the rock on the right side, that was a close call. Hole-shot good.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •