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Thread: Sheep?

  1. #1
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    Default Sheep?

    Thinking of planning a sheep hunt for 2013.
    I know nothing about sheep ranges or populations except what I read hear. I will be needing I guide n/r.
    Should I pick the area first and see who guides that range or just look for the guide and hunt where he hunts?
    If you were to pick a range for you one chance ,were would be your pick?

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    Member TWB's Avatar
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    Personally I would pick a reputable guide with a high rate of success and let them handle the logistics. Considering what a hunt costs, a guide worth his salt will get it done.

    I believe Jake (BRWNBR) chases sheep. Hit him up and see what he says.
    We do not go to the green woods and crystal waters to rough it, we go to smooth it. We get it rough enough at home; in towns and cities; in shops, offices, stores, banks anywhere that we may be placed

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    Member Yellowknife's Avatar
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    Personally, I would worry much more about the quality of the guide than the exact range. I've spent time in most of the ranges in Alaska and they are all cool in there own way. However, the quality of the guides can vary WIDELY. I get to work with a number of them, and some I would trust with my life without hesitation and others are extremely sketchy and are more interested in your deposit check than anything. Unfortunately, a few if the more unethical ones are pretty well known (they are better at marketing than hunting), so you need to look past the fancy websites.

    Get good references and descriptions of each guides hunting style, pick a good one, and you will have fun.

    Yk

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    Member kahahawai's Avatar
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    I would look at the area the guide works out of, and the price. as with all guides, prices vary, I have seen sheep hunts ranging from $9000 all the way up to $17000. Theres alot of variables here, do you want to fly in, atv in, or walk-in? also....do you plan on putting in for draw permits ( theres alot of guides that guide in the Tok and chugach state park area)...I know quite a few sheep hunting guides, and each one has their own way of operations from what I see. PM me if you have questions.

  5. #5

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    Can't go wrong with Matt Synder off the Tok cut off. www.tokmanagementarea.com

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    Member Alasken's Avatar
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    I would seriously look at hunting Canada. The trophy quality of sheep in AK has really diminished over the last several years. I heard from a long time acquaintance of mine who I consider to be a reliable source that a total of 9 B&C sheep have been shot this season statewide. It wasn't long ago that about half that number were coming out of 14C alone. I haven't confirmed this info with F&G but I'm sure that could easily be done. My point is there might be better opportunities in Canada for a trophy ram.
    Art is making something out of nothing and selling it.
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  7. #7

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    Honestly though, I believe sheep may be the hardest animal to get that makes record book. It takes an incredible ram to make that magic 170 mark. I know, been trying for a long time and it takes a sheep with it all to make it.

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    I perfer to to spend my money in the USA if I can, not that I haven't hunted canada. One full curl ram for my wall is what I am looking for not a boone and crocket.I would rather fly in and carry my camp with me so we can keep looking and not have to back track to a camp every day.I would think this would get the most time out of a hunt and higher chance at a shot.
    Do many of you guys carry your camps[tent stove and bag] and set up every night on the move.

  9. #9

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    Get ahold of Matt Synder. I think his type of hunts are right up your alley, plus if you get Frank or Sue as your guide, you will have some of the best sheep people in all of Alaska.

  10. #10
    Member HuntNBgame's Avatar
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    I tried for the Draw hunts for a couple years, through Matt. Kind of hard planning something on a Maybe. Ended up booking a Brooks hunt. I too wanted to stay US, Alaska gets in you blood and you can't stay away. Good luck in your quest.

  11. #11
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    I got a nice sheep with Ray Atkins out of Cantwell with Rick Hyce as my guide--can`t go wrong with that combo! Got a great goat with Ed Toribio out of Ketchikan and I think he does sheep--check on him! Hunted Grizzly with Jake Jefferson this Spring--unsucessfully but thought enough about him to book again next Fall--Jake hunts sheep and I`m sure he is good at it. Any of these guys will do you justice!!!!! Check them out! GOOD LUCK HUNTING!

  12. #12
    Member ArcticNorseman's Avatar
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    I drew a sheep tag this year and went on my first ever sheep hunt. It was a great experience; although, I didn't get a ram -- was limited to 3 days for hunting which wasn't really enough time to get into rams (5 or 6 days and I might just be telling a different story). The area I hunted was an any ram draw permit. Flew in and hiked a ways to set up base camp.

    I saw a lot of ewes and lambs (100+) and three rams. Didn't get a look at one of the three's horns; the other two were under full curl but I went after 'em. After 3+ miles and 3,000 vertical feet, I regret my partner and I didn't spike camp on the mountain rather than heading down to base camp. When we got back to the bottom of the drainage about 8 pm, looked up and here came the white spots into the area we vacated 90 minutes prior.

    Lessons I learned were:

    1. Draw permits for "any ram" are rare, and I really shoulda told my boss he wasn't hearing from me for 9 days. If you can get one for areas around Anchorage/Palmer, the competition should be less than open, full-curl areas. In the area I was in 10 permits (8 res & 2 N/R) were issued. I did see another plane a few miles downriver on a strip, but no other humans. I was hunting just before moose season opened.
    2. Physical conditioning: I was in poor physical shape and couldn't move nearly as fast as I wanted/needed to. I didn't quit, but man did I hurt . . . lol.
    3. Research the terrain of the range and talk with people familiar with it. My pilot was a good resource and so was the Fish and Game biologist.

    I had a few options of people to fly me in, and I chose one guy who was pretty good. I'd like to try others too, but funds may be a consideration. Should you get a permit in GMUs 13 or 14, there are a couple good pilot/guides to use and many of the members here can weigh-in on those.

    One final thought, if you're hitting opening morning (usally Aug 10th), get in 3 days early at a minimum. Glass, glass, and glass some more. Oh, and if you can combo-up, go after caribou. If you wait till 1 Sep, you might be able to double-up moose and sheep.

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