Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: modular homes

  1. #1

    Default modular homes

    Has anyone had any past experience with a modular home? I might look into one of these, maybe not in Alaska but as a getaway place in the states. They are quite a bit cheaper in price. Is the quality that much less?

  2. #2
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    11,415

    Default

    When we moved back to Alaska after I got out of the military we lived in a modular duplex built by http://sundbergmodularhomes.com/ I don't think I could tell the difference between it and a site built home once it was completed.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    wasilla
    Posts
    788

    Default

    I used to install a lot of wood, gas and pellet stoves in them and they are well built, as for the roofing and walls. I could not find anything diff in the construction between a stick frame and modular. They are 2x6 framing and the insulation was above average at least the units in the mountains in Colorado. You can also order varied roof pitches up to and maybe steeper than 6/12 pitch.
    Hope this helps a bit.

    Sweepint
    Wasilla, (when not overseas)
    '' Livn' The Dream ''
    26' Hewescraft Cuddy, twin 115 Yam

  4. #4

    Default

    i currently live in a prefab/modular home 28'wide 62'long ranch style with 12'x18' sunroom addition, it's almost 2000 sq ft & sits over a basement of same dimensions, house is 6yrs old & have had only minor issues w/plaster cracking due to setteling which is easily repairable & then painted over. I used DESIGN HOMES in Prairie Du Chien, Wis. but they have locations all over the country, i would suggest them to anyone & no i dont work for, get kickbacks nor recieve any gain for myself or anyone, i'm just happy with my home & would recomend them to all who ask. home has 4/12 pitch roof, 2x6 wall construction & is well insulated only suggestion would be to go with 9' walls for a basement to conceal plumbing & wireing. any questions you may have i'd be happy to assist/answer if i can.

  5. #5
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Talkeetna
    Posts
    5,714

    Default

    I make my living off of selling materials for the construction of homes, yet I don't have a single bad thing to say about the two modular homes that are in my neighborhood. They look great inside and are cheap to heat.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

  6. #6
    Member greythorn3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Chasin the ladys! away!
    Posts
    2,507

    Default

    i lived in a few trailerhouses, they werent to bad. but i do prefer a house without wheels nowadays.
    Semper Fi!

  7. #7
    New member
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    6

    Default

    "Modular Homes" of 2011 are not your father's modular home of 20 or 30 years ago. Granted, the term is very broad based, from lieterally things that roll in on wheels, to very high end panel or unitized construction.

    Let's say we are talking something in the middle of the road. Walls or units that are brought onto your site...i suppose that could even include a 'unit' that is the whole house if the thing was small enough.

    Excluding the low end, these things are very well built. Think about it. The construction takes place in a dry, warm, level interior shop where all the elements which make building out of doors a hassle do not exist. No mud; no rain; electricity/air; dry lumber; heat/a/c; and LEVEL ground/benches to work on which makes life SO much better for the builders. Things come out perfectly square--and imagine how nice that is for each successive trade that works on the house!

    The finished product evolves more quiuckly, and is thus priced competitively. The tolerances are more exacting, and the overall quality is higher than many site-built untis.

    On the high end, you can't compare modular with site built. The old stigma still exists (it's a trailer!) but the reality is once you move past that, high end builders are doing more and more modular because you end up with a higher quality product at no more, and many times less, cost.

  8. #8
    Member greythorn3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Chasin the ladys! away!
    Posts
    2,507

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by The Bear View Post
    "Modular Homes" of 2011 are not your father's modular home of 20 or 30 years ago. Granted, the term is very broad based, from lieterally things that roll in on wheels, to very high end panel or unitized construction.

    Let's say we are talking something in the middle of the road. Walls or units that are brought onto your site...i suppose that could even include a 'unit' that is the whole house if the thing was small enough.

    Excluding the low end, these things are very well built. Think about it. The construction takes place in a dry, warm, level interior shop where all the elements which make building out of doors a hassle do not exist. No mud; no rain; electricity/air; dry lumber; heat/a/c; and LEVEL ground/benches to work on which makes life SO much better for the builders. Things come out perfectly square--and imagine how nice that is for each successive trade that works on the house!

    The finished product evolves more quiuckly, and is thus priced competitively. The tolerances are more exacting, and the overall quality is higher than many site-built untis.

    On the high end, you can't compare modular with site built. The old stigma still exists (it's a trailer!) but the reality is once you move past that, high end builders are doing more and more modular because you end up with a higher quality product at no more, and many times less, cost.
    that like when sears used to sell houses. maybe they will start again. u can buy um one wall at a time.
    Semper Fi!

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •