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Thread: Stone Masonry, Cordwood Masonry, Timber framing, Logsmithing, and Sod roofing.

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    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    Default Stone Masonry, Cordwood Masonry, Timber framing, Logsmithing, and Sod roofing.

    I keep buying up as many books regarding the above mentioned topics. They sure do make for some good reading! Does anyone else read these type of books or partake in these styles of building?

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    I recently bought a book on cordwood masonry, but wondered how this type of construction would do in an area with active earthquake activity, like we seem to have here every so often. Also have several logsmith books. I agree....they are good reading!

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    I've read everything I could get my hands on for the last several years. You could toss straw bale into that list as well.

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    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    I have books on just about every construction method. For remote cabins I have just about crossed every method besides stick framing and fiberglass insulation off my list.

    1) Cordwood looks cool, but the thought of hauling cement and sand to a remote site for mortar turns me off.
    2) Straw looks good too...but the hauling of straw and fixings for the stucco on the outside turns me off.
    3) Timberframe is cool, but it's time consuming and lack of really good trees in most of non-coastal Alaska makes it difficult to find the proper trees for the job. Combined with straw I guess you could build a hybrid of the two and fix the siding and snow load issues of straw.
    4) Log home. See my comments about proper trees above. It's doable, but it often takes years to find enough trees around your lot to build them. Very time consuming.
    5) Stone masonary... without heavy machinery, no thanks
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

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    Have you looked into vertical log construction? With the wood you have mentioned this may be a better option...

    eorge

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    Mainer, I have a lot of books within arms reach of my crapper, that does not mean I would do it. Just another interesting read. Stick with the tried and true, you can't go wrong. Like the bumper sticker said years ago, " eat moose, 20,000 wolves can't be wrong." Well... 20,000 contractors can't be wrong!!!!! EH?
    If a dipnetter dips a fish and there is no one around to see/hear it, Did he really dip?

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    Member cdubbin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mainer_in_ak View Post
    I keep buying up as many books regarding the above mentioned topics. They sure do make for some good reading! Does anyone else read these type of books or partake in these styles of building?
    I like to read these kind of books as well, but as a professional builder I have to say these methods have no place in our extreme northern climate. I can't imagine how long it would take to heat up a stone house on a subzero day. Brrrrrrrr!!!!!!
    " Gas boats are bad enough, autos are an invention of the devil, and airplanes are worse." ~Allen Hasselborg

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    Member garnede's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cdubbin View Post
    I like to read these kind of books as well, but as a professional builder I have to say these methods have no place in our extreme northern climate. I can't imagine how long it would take to heat up a stone house on a subzero day. Brrrrrrrr!!!!!!

    As long as you kept them warm it would take a long time to cool off too.

    You might also want to look at Cob. There are homes in new zealand that were built in the 1700's that have withstood magnitude 7 earthquakes built with this method.

    For the straw bale construction you will need to look into the large square bales or a post and beam straw bale construction. The small 50-100 lb straw bales just don't have the structural strength needed, so they need to be combined with a post and beam system. The large bales require machinery to move, but they are structural.
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