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Thread: Answer a few questions for me please.

  1. #1

    Default Answer a few questions for me please.

    Im moving to AK next summer, as soon as my wife gets out if collage. I've been reading the AK hunting regs and I have a few questions that I would love you guys to answer if you don't mind. Here in Arkansas the game and fish commision sets state wide bag limits. I can not find any state wide limits in AK. I found the unit limits though. My first question is, for instance, if I take a bear on kodiak, it's limited to to one bear every four years, so, can I still go to another unit where the limit is one a year and take another one in the same year? The same question goes for other critters too. I'm not greedy. I don't want to kill every animal possible, I'm just wondering, plus, I really really like bear hunting. Next question is about bison. I know it's one bison every ten years. How hard is it to get a tag? There are "ranches" within five hours of here where I can "hunt" them but it's really not much of a hunt. I would love to hunt free-range wild bison. I also really really want a muskox. That brings me to my last question for now. I see on some muskox units they require the horns to be cut off and retained by game and fish. Why?

    Thanks for any info! See ya next summer.

  2. #2
    Member akjeff's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tic View Post
    My first question is, for instance, if I take a bear on kodiak, it's limited to to one bear every four years, so, can I still go to another unit where the limit is one a year and take another one in the same year?
    NO! You can not exceed the annual limit of the area you are in. Even if you kill outside that area. If you kill a bear in a "one bear a year" area you can kill another in a "2 or more bear" a year area. BUT, if you kill in a multi bear a year area first, you CAN NOT kill in a "one bear a year" area after that, during the same season.

    The answer to your last question is "subsistence hunt" vs "sport Hunt".

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    And better start applying for bison tags now, you might get drawn before you die.....might.
    I'd agree with you, but then we'd both be wrong.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by akjeff View Post
    NO! You can not exceed the annual limit of the area you are in. Even if you kill outside that area. If you kill a bear in a "one bear a year" area you can kill another in a "2 or more bear" a year area. BUT, if you kill in a multi bear a year area first, you CAN NOT kill in a "one bear a year" area after that, during the same season.

    The answer to your last question is "subsistence hunt" vs "sport Hunt".
    So, if I got one in a 1 every 4 year unit I could move to a 1 a year unit, then move to a 2 a year unit?

    Now I understand the muskox thing now.

    One more question, in a few units on moose you are required to leave the bones in the quarters? Why? Seems like a lot of extra weight to pack out.

    Thanks again for the info.

    Guess I'll "hunt" the bison at one of those "ranches".

  5. #5

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    On the bear question, never mind. I figured it out. You can take a total wo up to two a year right? I got it now.

  6. #6
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tic View Post
    So, if I got one in a 1 every 4 year unit I could move to a 1 a year unit, then move to a 2 a year unit?

    Now I understand the muskox thing now.

    One more question, in a few units on moose you are required to leave the bones in the quarters? Why? Seems like a lot of extra weight to pack out.

    Thanks again for the info.

    Guess I'll "hunt" the bison at one of those "ranches".
    Just to clarify, you can't go from a one/4 years unit to a one/year unit, as the limit in both areas is one. You can go from a one bear limit area to a two bear limit area and take one additional bear, but not in the reverse order. The same is true for caribou, deer, and any other species that might have a limit of more than one. All limits are considered to be statewide, in a sense. My one caribou harvested in unit 7 prevents me from hunting caribou in any other unit that also has a one caribou limit. Hopefully that makes sense.

    As for muskox, the basic gist of laws like that is that they're trying to manage demand. By requiring horn destruction they cut the number of people who are interested in the hunt, thus there are fewer hunters chasing a limited number of animals. That enables things like longer seasons, more over-the-counter opportunities, etc. There are similar hunts for moose where antler destruction is required.

    With regards to bone-in requirements in some caribou and moose hunts, there are three plausible reasons for this: First, leaving the bone in improves meat quality, as there are fewer exposed surfaces for bacteria to get into the meat. Secondly, bone-in requirements make it easier to determine exactly how many quarters are present. As the story goes, some years back there were areas where people were killing more than their limit of caribou, but the quarters were cut up into so many small pieces so as to make it impossible to determine exactly how many quarters were present. Lastly, requiring the bone be left in can have a similar effect as antler destruction. Being as the quarters will be heavier and more difficult to pack, it may dissuade some people from participating in that hunt.

    For bison, it costs $10 per hunt to apply for the drawing permit ($5 for most other species) and you're allowed a maximum of three hunt choices per species. Your chances of winning one are generally less than 1%, though some of the more difficult-to-access areas have slightly higher odds. I wouldn't count on winning one, but you never know. Many members on this board (myself included) have won bison permits in the past, so it doesn't hurt to try.

  7. #7
    Member AK Ray's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tic View Post
    One more question, in a few units on moose you are required to leave the bones in the quarters? Why? Seems like a lot of extra weight to pack out.
    Because when folks start boning out the meat they end up leaving behind too much meat and wasting it. There also is the fact that meat keeps better when left on the bone and is easier to handle.

  8. #8

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    Thanks for the info. Most of my questions have been answered. I'm sure I'll have a few more.

    I noticed there are a few places and animals that you can hunt all year. That is so cool. I can not wait to get up there. I have to be a resident for a year before I can get a resident license. My first year l be hunting moose, caribou, and black bear. Plus, I might try to sneak in a deer hunt or two. You guys don't know how lucky you are to have the hunting opertunitys that you have.

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    Being able to take advantage of all the opportunities often exceeds the $capital$, time constraints and access of the vast majority of residents and non-residents alike.

    You may be quite surprised at just how much $$$ it will take to do what you wish to do upon your arrival, the land is vast, the access is poor. If you do not have one already, purchase a Alaska Atlas and Gazetteer and get familiar with it. Compare it to the GMU's and road systems then get physicaly fit, yourt boots, after you get out of your truck, ATV, boat, snowmachine, etc., are the best mode of transportation to a successful hunt.

  10. #10
    Premium Member Wyo2AK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by .338WM View Post
    Being able to take advantage of all the opportunities often exceeds the $capital$, time constraints and access of the vast majority of residents and non-residents alike.

    You may be quite surprised at just how much $$$ it will take to do what you wish to do upon your arrival, the land is vast, the access is poor. If you do not have one already, purchase a Alaska Atlas and Gazetteer and get familiar with it. Compare it to the GMU's and road systems then get physicaly fit, yourt boots, after you get out of your truck, ATV, boat, snowmachine, etc., are the best mode of transportation to a successful hunt.
    I was just thinking the same thing. While there are a host of great hunting opportunities here, accessing them all, especially in one year, can be a heck of a challenge. Not trying to rain on your parade, but just give you a healthy dose of what to expect. Think of it akin to having free reign to hunt Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, New Mexico, Utah, Nevade, Washington and Oregon... BUT, you only have I-70, I-25, and I-40 for access. You get the idea. Moving up here definitely required a major overhaul in how I thought about planning/scheduling hunting trips.

    Hopefully you're newly graduated wife is going to be making some serious $$$.
    Pursue happiness with diligence.

  11. #11
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by .338WM View Post
    ... the land is vast, the access is poor.
    In addition to those truths, the game densities are generally far lower in Alaska than they are in the lower 48. We don't mean to discourage you here, but rather to give you an accurate picture of hunting in Alaska so that you have more realistic expectations. By all means, come up and get after it and have high hopes. Just realize that you'll experience some frustrations along with the excitement, and that coming home empty handed is more common for most hunters than coming home with full meat bags.

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    In addition to those truths, the game densities are generally far lower in Alaska than they are in the lower 48. We don't mean to discourage you here, but rather to give you an accurate picture of hunting in Alaska so that you have more realistic expectations. By all means, come up and get after it and have high hopes. Just realize that you'll experience some frustrations along with the excitement, and that coming home empty handed is more common for most hunters than coming home with full meat bags.
    Brian, clear your PM inbox, you need more space...

  13. #13
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    Also some folks are extremely lucky... I have a buddy who came up last year went to Juneau, his brother in-law and sister took him on a brown bear hunt 3 hours later he is sending pictures of the 8 1/2 foot brown bear he shot... I told him thier are life long Alaskans who have yet had a chance to shoot 8 plus foot bear. So I suspect when these folks get back to the lower 48 and tell thier tales, you can understand why others down in the lower 48 get all enamored with Alaska they think thier a 60 inch bull moose on every corner and 9 foot brown bears begging to be shot and caribou running through our back yards.

    I will admit when I came up here I thought I was going to do it all the 1st couple of years then cold hard reality sat in yep need a ATV the sport qauds from Arizona were not going to cut it. Uh oh that ATV is not cutting it I need to get a UTV man that 4x4 UTV just not cutting it either I need a 6x6. It just keeps going, next year I'm going to do a fly in hunt off the haul road I'm done dealing with other folks on the road. Also get used to driving 300 plus miles to go moose hunting... even further for caribou

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by .338WM View Post
    Being able to take advantage of all the opportunities often exceeds the $capital$, time constraints and access of the vast majority of residents and non-residents alike.

    You may be quite surprised at just how much $$$ it will take to do what you wish to do upon your arrival, the land is vast, the access is poor. If you do not have one already, purchase a Alaska Atlas and Gazetteer and get familiar with it. Compare it to the GMU's and road systems then get physicaly fit, yourt boots, after you get out of your truck, ATV, boat, snowmachine, etc., are the best mode of transportation to a successful hunt.

    +1 to what he said.

    This is a brief overview to my hunts and cost from last year.

    Started the spring off with a Black Bear hunt using all my own gear, boat based.

    Total cost for food, gas, parking ect...Plus taxidermy for one bear rug and tanning of another hide.

    $3000.00









    Next was a Sheep fly in.

    My expenses were right at 3K, plus $1250.00 for taxidermy.





    After Sheep season my buddy and I did 2 different moose hunts.

    We took his boat and went to the Koyukuk River. Cost for the trip was right at 3K and we split that so $1500 each.





    We then did a fly in float hunt for my Moose.

    This hunt was out of Kotz, airline tickets, air charter and shipping gear and meat. 8K and my share was about 6K, I paid extra since I killed the Bull and he took a extra flight to get him back to Kotz.



    Worth every dime.



    I own all the gear, if you don't add raft and gear rental.



    Did the taxidermy myself, so saved a few bucks there.



    As the snow started to fly in Fairbanks I headed off to Kodiak to try for a Goat.

    This hunt cost around $1700 plus the taxidermy which is $2500 or so for a 1/2 mount and base.

    Plus my Buddies wife took a roll down the mountain and was picked up by the coast guard. That cost mega money for all those medical bills and lost work time.



    Back to Kodiak for a try at registration bears. Stayed with a friend and hunted the road system. Cost about $700, no bear but a great time.



    The Guys and Gals I know that have done the trophy Ox hunt were out real close to 10K after the trip and taxidermy.

    Bring a wheel barrel full of money and a Saint for a wife and enjoy!!!!!!!

    Steve
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    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by .338WM View Post
    get physicaly fit, yourt boots, after you get out of your truck, ATV, boat, snowmachine, etc., are the best mode of transportation to a successful hunt.
    Well said...and true.

    I'll also parrot what has been said here...temper your zeal with a patience if you want to avoid frustration.

    Your first year I'd suggest concentrating on small game, learning your way around and perhaps a black bear tag. I also recommend you hunt near where your home will be initially because that figures into the equation regarding logistics cost and some additional subsistence opportunities. As you research you'll learn that some opportunities are so remote they're not worth the considerable $$$ to take advantage of them. I've met several folks who plugged a big chunk of cash into a marginal hunt their first year and walked away dissapointed.

    You don't mention where your home will be, but keep in mind that logistics cost here are enormous. I live in the Interior so the hunting is comparitively inexpensive for the species that live here. I can't imagine what some Anchorage residents spend to hunt here between time-off, fuel, transport, etc. since there is comparitively little hunting in the Bowl itself.

    I don't know how you hunt in Arkansas but when I came up from TN I had to learn a whole new way to hunt. Not much spot and stalk in the South and it presented something of a learning curve to me. Not bad but it took some time.

    Just some food for thought.

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    Guys, I would also like to thank you for the answers.....

    I'm not the OP but these responses are great food for thought.

  17. #17

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    Yea, I can see spending a lot of money hunting. I hope to do a lot of float hunting. I don't mind walking. As for getting in shape, I've got a little work to do. Not a lot, but, a little. I can't wait to get there.

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    Quote Originally Posted by J in AK View Post
    Brian, clear your PM inbox, you need more space...
    Whoops! Done...

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    While hunts of the quality that Stid posted above are certainly expensive, you can have good hunts off the road system for minimal expense. This year I was in on four caribou kills (one of my own, three of friends/family) that cost a combined total of less than $500. I've done black bear hunts for less than $100, and the same can be said of some moose hunts. For less money, though, what you get is either more competition, lower game densities, more onerous restrictions (antler size, etc.), or lack of motorized access. If you're willing to climb, hike, and be wet, you can find some decent hunting without shelling out thousands and thousands of dollars. It's not easy...but it can be done.

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    Member .338-06's Avatar
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    What was that line AKRes had? Something like "Cash your paycheck every week, go stand in the shower with all your clothes on with the cold water running, tearing your money into little bits and throwing it down the drain. When you get to like this, you are ready to hunt in Alaska."






    Of course it's not always that bad, but it can be. Hunting is expensive in time and money.
    I may be slow, but I get where I'm going!

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