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Thread: Duck boat pics?

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    Default Duck boat pics?

    Hello all,

    I am about to start a build of a new duck boat, and am looking for ideas. I will be starting the season out with my old rig but plan on shooting out of the new boat later in the season...hopefuly. Right now I am planning on building the 14' duckhunter.

    Anyway, I was hoping to get a good pic thread going. Lets see your duck boats, and any useful features built into the design, like ammo storage, gun racks, dog ramps ect. I have been reading, and researching boats for a few weeks now(this time), and I think the DH has just about everything I could want for my area.

    To say I have the itch would be quite an understatement.

    Anyone else building a boat?

  2. #2
    Member Boomstickalaskan's Avatar
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    Who makes the plans for the 14' Duck Hunter? I couldn't find it on the web.

    You should post pictures of your build.

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    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...at-motor-combo

    Follow this thread about the Hybred. I've never seen one but am considering on myself, looks like a cool boat for what I want also. I'm sure Ray and others will answer any questions you may have. Thread is only a few days old. Bud

    open all the links connected to the above thread and you will find many duck boats
    Wasilla

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    Boomstick,
    The plans are from Gator boats, it has been around for a while and is pretty popular. It seems like a stout little boat.

    http://www.gatorboats.com/Duckhunter-Boat-Plans.htm

    I also was looking at the broadbill.

    http://www.clarkcraft.com/cgi-local/...a471263c296896

    Devlin also has some very nice looking boats. Its tough to decide.

    I looked at some of the hybrids but they seem like a very bare bones boat, I am looking for something a little larger, and more of a detailed build.

    I figured after 25 years of hunting ducks from shore, johnboats and a kayak the last couple seasons, I am going to splurge and build a sweet duck boat. I actually wanted to buy one but shipping is just unbelievable.

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    If you are hunting in spots that you have to deal with ocean swells you will want some rocker to the boat and some displacement to give some stability in seas. The DH has rocker but it is flat bottomed and might not be all that fun in a chop.

    Having a Devlin Black Brant III I would recommend one for your use out there. They are great boats and handle mild sea conditions really well. However, their semi displacement hull shape can keep you from using the boat in water that is less than 12 inches deep.

    For wooden boat building help I recommend going to duckboats.net and searching for the various build threads. There are not a lot of boat builders on this forum.

    http://duckboats.net/cgi-bin/forum/gforum.cgi

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    Both of those look like very nice boats, especially for larger water. I assume by looking at those you will trailer the boat and the ability to portage it across land is not something you need to be able to do where you hunt. Where you hunt do you need to be able to use a mud motor of some sort, such as a long tail mud buddy? I assume Kodiak is more salt water hunting but could be wrong there. I'm considering a 12' hybred which should be light enough to portage and still very stable to hunt from. Will be selling my 13' Herters fiberglass boat after this season.

    Shipping: 2 ideas for you to get quote for is you want to buy a premade boat. Talk to seller of boat about just getting truck shipping to Carslile in Seattle quote. Boat can be trucked to their dock in seattle. Then call Carslile and ask about barge shipping to Anchorage, Usually much more affordable then if you get a quote for direct trucking to Anchorage. Also go on www.uship.com and fill in info for quote on size, weight, etc from mfg to both Carslile and Anchorage. Shippers then bid on the shipping, When I was considering buying a new airboat last year, I had a shipping quote from them for under $2000 (from florida)and that was for a much much larger boat they you are considering. Bud
    Wasilla

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    Attachment 53426
    8ft hybrid. just got a new (to me) motor. Quack, quack. BOOM! BOOM!

  8. #8

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    10.5' hybrid. Dont be fooled into thinking they are simple boats. your building it so its whatever you want. Mine has, shelf, gun rack, dog ramp, spud polls, dry storage, pop up blind or layout doors whatever you need to use for the day, zodaic wheels for portages. and drop in seating as well as fixed seating. I've owned a lot of boats and nothing has been this nice to hunt from. You can't get options like that on a small jon boat. I've hunted 2 guys and a dog hauling 5 dozen deeks and had zero issues with both guys standing to shoot. Its the most stable small bout i've ever seen. With all that said I wouldn't hunt in over a 18" chop and even thats going to suck due to the completely flat bottom. I've found that there is no one perfect boat for duck hunting. I think we all need about three. A marsh boat, a big water boat with a big outboard and a mud motor setup. Now if we could just sell that speech to out wives.
    DSC02477.jpgDSC02608.jpg

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    Member AK Ray's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Griffin4590 View Post
    Now if we could just sell that speech to our wives.
    Looks in side yard at river jet boat, Devlin duck boat, and super light hybrid sitting on top of duck boat, then looks out back window at metal canoe and small wooden canoe....looks at plans to build another duck boat.....then wonders if I need one of them "wives" people keep talking about.

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    I just ordered the plans for the Duck Hunter. Since I don't have a garage...or a wife I will probably build it in my kitchen. Where in the valley/Anchorage area can you get marine plywood? I will post pics of the build, and can't wait to get it started. Hopefully I can get it out before the birds are gone.
    Some people call it sky busting... I call it optimism
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    You can get marine plywood at Spenard builders supply. It's expensive.

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    Griffin, after seeing the two Hybrids you built, I looked at the Hybrid website and I think I'm going to build a 10' Prototype. Well kind of the Prototype with a little bit of tweaking. I don't like the rounded top. I will try to post a picture of the model I built. Do you remember what size Plywood you used. I was thinking 1/4" for skin and 1/2" for structure. I think I will build it the way Devlin teaches. Not a big fan of the glue the Hybrid plans call for. Again, thanks to you and your buddy for letting me poke around at your boats last Saturday.

    [IMG]IMG_2321[/IMG]

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    Let me know how much the supplies are...sure you will have a lot of things you could and would do different when I get you to build mine..lol

    Sounds like a great project to eat off of...wish you the best..keep me updated. I think I would bank on making it a winter project as in a month the birds will be gone in the places you hunt....the water will be locked up.

    cant wait to see the boat..checked out the site yesteday myself..seems like a fun project.
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    Quote Originally Posted by duckslayer56 View Post
    I just ordered the plans for the Duck Hunter. Since I don't have a garage...or a wife I will probably build it in my kitchen. Where in the valley/Anchorage area can you get marine plywood? I will post pics of the build, and can't wait to get it started. Hopefully I can get it out before the birds are gone.
    Two years ago you could have bought a partially finished DH out there from a guy that was leaving the state. He must have spent three months trying to sell it on here and CL. He was still hawking it the week he was leaving town so I don't know what happened to it.

    You can buy okoume imported tropical wood marine ply from Hardware Specialties in Anchorage. They order it up from Tacoma and when it comes in you can drive in and pick it up. There is no shipping fees, and while there you can buy the other solid woods you need for keels and coaming.

    For marine fir ply SBS is the only option. It is not much cheaper than okoume these days.

    You can get WEST epoxy from Plaschem in Anchorage down by AK Mill and Feed. I prefer to order epoxy from either RAKA or US Composites. WEST is really high quality material, but at nearly a third more than the cost of mail order epoxy, its not worth it. You don't want to use polyester resin since it does not bond well with wood and will delaminate over time.

    For anyone wanting to modify at DH go to Toller Boat Works and check out Brad's modifications. Lots of useful information. Brad is also the moderator for the gator boats forums when ever they are functioning. They seem to have some server issues every year that take a while to be resolved.

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    Ray, have you heard of or have any experience in stretching a hybred to 12 ft. I would consider one, they sound ideal, but occasionally I hunt with 2 people and 2 dogs and really want room for deks etc. I saw the forum you had links to was dated back in 07 & 08, is the guy there still forwarding email copies of the plans. I am not much of a craftsman and tend to slap things together after I lose patience, but the hybred looks simple enough I might even be able to do it it not too cold in my unheated garage. Bud
    Wasilla

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    Bud, the hybrid is pretty simple to add length to. Just add it to the stern section using backed butt joints with the backing on the inside. You will have to plan out your plywood joints so that they are supported by a frame or bulkhead. The other thing you will want to do is beef up the floor with stringers on the inside or move up to 3/8 ply and use two keels on the outside.

    Rich has a website for ordering plans for the modern version of the boat. You have to pay for these but they are worth it since they have a lot of detailed info for the construction. The old free plans are for a dinkly little boat, and the plans are hard to expand upon without some boat building skills. The NL (next level) would be the one you should build since its sides go straight back and all you do is add additional material to the stern ends. Build one with a hunt deck so that your dog can get back into the boat over the stern simplely.

    http://www.hybridduckboat.com/files/

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    Member duckslayer56's Avatar
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    Thanks for the info Ray, it helps out a lot, because I had no clue on where I could have gotten the epoxy. Can I pick up the fiberglass at these places as well? Also which would be the better material for the hull, the Okoume or fir? I have been checking other forums, and heard of people using kevlar instead of plywood for the hull. I am going to research this more, and find out the pros and cons. I am sure it's way more expensive than fiberglass.

    Hugh, I will post pics of the build so you can see it.
    Some people call it sky busting... I call it optimism
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boomstickalaskan View Post
    Griffin, after seeing the two Hybrids you built, I looked at the Hybrid website and I think I'm going to build a 10' Prototype. Well kind of the Prototype with a little bit of tweaking. I don't like the rounded top. I will try to post a picture of the model I built. Do you remember what size Plywood you used. I was thinking 1/4" for skin and 1/2" for structure. I think I will build it the way Devlin teaches. Not a big fan of the glue the Hybrid plans call for. Again, thanks to you and your buddy for letting me poke around at your boats last Saturday. [IMG]IMG_2321[/IMG]
    glad you got to see it man. Mine is stitched and glued like in the devlin plans. I didn't like the glue idea either however there are 100s of people who build boats with the glue and had no issues. The smaller one i built for my buddy is built with glue and is solid as a rock. Do not stress the thickness of the plywood. All your strenght comes for your fiberglass not the wood. Mine is a 3/8" bottom with 1/4" everything else save for the transom and thats all 3/4" The 1/4" plywood once glassed is rock solid. Myself and my 90 pound mutt (the humper lol) can both stand on the nose to enter the boat and it bairly flexes. If you use 1/4" for skin and 1/2" structure you will be just fine. the only reason I used the 3/4" structure is due to the size motor I am running. I like the NL a lot better then the prototype. email richard, the boat designer and talk to him some about what you want out of the boat and see what he recomends. he is a wealth of info. I'll prob be selling mine this winter rather then moving it. Going to build a aluminum one with a copperhead mud motor

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    Quote Originally Posted by duckslayer56 View Post
    Thanks for the info Ray, it helps out a lot, because I had no clue on where I could have gotten the epoxy. Can I pick up the fiberglass at these places as well? Also which would be the better material for the hull, the Okoume or fir? I have been checking other forums, and heard of people using kevlar instead of plywood for the hull. I am going to research this more, and find out the pros and cons. I am sure it's way more expensive than fiberglass.

    Hugh, I will post pics of the build so you can see it.
    My personal choice is to go with the okoume. It is light weight - almost as light as cedar - well made, and very easy to work with hand tools when fitting pieces together. Being a tropical wood it is more resistant to rot if you have some damage that is not repaired right away. But mostly it is the lightweight that draws me to using it.

    However, there are many boats - Hybrids, Tolmans, etc - that are made from standard fir plywood and as long as the epoxy is done well and the boat is maintained every year, they last for decades.

    If the birch/poplar underlayment they sell up here was of any quality - warps so bad you can hardly cut it straight - it would not be a bad choice or a light weight Hybrid. Many boats in Europe are made from Finnish birch marine plywood. Too bad the US made stuff is such crap.

    You can order FG cloth from both places or buy it locally at Plaschem.

    There is no need to use kevlar on a small boat. The 6oz FG cloth over light plywood is stronger than a kevlar only hull.

    You can get into a full kevlar cloth and epoxy hull by building a plug mold. This is usually the most expensive way to build a small boat unless you are building several off the same plug mold. Kevlar absorbs more epoxy than FG cloth and will make your boat heavier unless you use some vac bag system to squeeze out the extra goop. Unless you plan on skipping your boat over oyster shoals you don't need kevlar.

    I am also a big fan of stitch and glue method using zip ties. The last boat was a super light Hybrid type boat and I used Ted Moore's method for doing the fillets - tape off the seam area you want the thickened epoxy to go - which made for some neat and small fillets.

    The other thing I recommend for these small boats is to have a shear clamp on the outside of the gunnel. This gives you an edge to nail the top decking to as well as something to grip on the edge of the boat when moving it. On my light Hybrid I but the shear clamp on the inside like a kayak and it worked well for attaching the decking, but makes the outside corner a real pain to grip when moving the boat around. My big Devlin boat has the shear clamp on the outside and it also acts as a rub rail. Very handy on a boat in a swamp that is being moved around, dragged, and banged into stuff.

  20. #20

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    If weight is going to be a major consideration, you might also want to consider a foam core boat. It is lighter than wood, although for the good stuff - Divinycel - it will be more expensive than even marine grade plywood or okoume. And it does not rot or absorb water. Speaking of plywood, if you are going to use plywood, I would be tempted to just use the standard exterior stuff rather than marine grade due to price. The main difference is that marine grade does not have voids that can hold water (it uses the same adhesive between layers), but if the water gets to the wood, you are going to get rot over time with either type. Like AK Ray says, a lot of boats have been built from standard exterior plywood and epoxy.

    I built a 16' hovercraft hull with epoxy and Divinycel (the 5# per cubic foot density version) that weighs about 200# (slighly less than my 16' Lund although there is a lot more to the hovercraft hull). At this weight, it is pretty bombproof with a layer of 6 oz cloth over X mat (18oz roving sewn to 3/4 oz mat) on top and bottom of floor, on front deck and on all critical seams (if I had to do it over, I wouldn't go so heavy). I am sure that a reasonably sturdy 14' duckboat could be built with a foam core that would weigh less than 100#.

    As a source for epoxy, although I have bought a lot of West's from Plaschem, you will likely find West Marine here in Anchorage to be cheaper.

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