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Thread: Goat meat

  1. #1
    Member hoose35's Avatar
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    Default Goat meat

    I put this over on the meat section as well. what do you guys do with the meat? I got my first goat this year. I generally do all my own processing, steaks, roasts, stewmeat, etc and take leftovers to indian valley for pepper sticks, sausage etc. I was thinking on the goat, making a few roasts and taking the rest in for some sausage and burger. I ate some of it already and the pieces I had weren't too tough, I've heard stories before that it could be so tough you couldnt chew it.
    Responsible Conservation > Political Allocation

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    Goat meat is horrible...horrible....nasty....dont try it..... Just drop it off at my door step and I will throw it away for you so you dont have to worry about it....

    pm me and i'll come get it....lol

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    I'm in the same boat - what butt steaks I've tried so far are quite tough, and my goat aged for 12 days prior to butchering. The taste is very mild and subtle - wife likes it best of any game so far, to include sheep.

    We've had success with the butt pieces by slicing thin and beating on them a bit with the meat mallet prior to a brief marinade for stir-frying. Once we figured out that the butt and shoulders were pretty tough, we assigned a greater percentage of hindquarter and shoulder meat to be ground rather than wrapped, vs a sheep where I'm wrapping everything that could possibly be cut into a few panfry steaks. The grinding meat is frozen and waiting for a trip to my sausage guy.

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    Member fullkurl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vek View Post
    I'm in the same boat - what butt steaks I've tried so far are quite tough, and my goat aged for 12 days prior to butchering. The taste is very mild and subtle - wife likes it best of any game so far, to include sheep.

    We've had success with the butt pieces by slicing thin and beating on them a bit with the meat mallet prior to a brief marinade for stir-frying. Once we figured out that the butt and shoulders were pretty tough, we assigned a greater percentage of hindquarter and shoulder meat to be ground rather than wrapped, vs a sheep where I'm wrapping everything that could possibly be cut into a few panfry steaks. The grinding meat is frozen and waiting for a trip to my sausage guy.
    +1, Vek.

    Tasty but tough. Your methods mirror ours exactly....
    Proud to be an American!

  5. #5

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    Goat is my personal favorite... too bad it is so hard to come by. Enjoy... If you find that you don't care for it, you know my number...

  6. #6
    Member Roland on the River's Avatar
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    I know a guy that will trade you a limit of Teal or drake mallards for one Merganzer as that is what he prefers to eat. To each his own.

  7. #7
    Member hoose35's Avatar
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    I assure everyone I am not looking to get rid of it, in fact it is now all processed, and I made a goat burger tonight, it was delicious. Ed, you are welcome to come over and get some if you like, I split it in half with my dad since he worked just as hard as me getting it out.
    Responsible Conservation > Political Allocation

  8. #8

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    Gyro Meat (Alaskan Style)

    substitute GOAT/SHEEP and MOOSE/CARIBOU/BLACK-TAIL (I have not tried this yet but does like something sound interesting to try for those who shun WILDGAME)

    • 1/2 onion, cut into chunks
    • 1 pound ground lamb
    • 1 pound ground beef
    • 1 tablespoon minced garlic
    • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
    • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
    • 1 teaspoon dried marjoram
    • 1 teaspoon ground dried rosemary
    • 1 teaspoon ground dried thyme
    • 1 teaspoon ground black pepper
    • 1/4 teaspoon sea salt

    Directions


    1. Place the onion in a food processor, and process until finely chopped. Scoop the onions onto the center of a towel, gather up the ends of the towel, and squeeze out the liquid from the onions. Place the onions into a mixing bowl along with the lamb and beef. Season with the garlic, oregano, cumin, marjoram, rosemary, thyme, black pepper, and salt. Mix well with your hands until well combined. Cover, and refrigerate 1 to 2 hours to allow the flavors to blend.
    2. Preheat oven to 325 degrees F (165 degrees C).
    3. Place the meat mixture into the food processor, and pulse for about a minute until finely chopped and the mixture feels tacky. Pack the meat mixture into a 7x4 inch loaf pan, making sure there are no air pockets. Line a roasting pan with a damp kitchen towel. Place the loaf pan on the towel, inside the roasting pan, and place into the preheated oven. Fill the roasting pan with boiling water to reach halfway up the sides of the loaf pan.
    4. Bake until the gyro meat is no longer pink in the center, and the internal temperature registers 165 degrees F (75 degrees C) on a meat thermometer, 45 minutes to 1 hour. Pour off any accumulated fat, and allow to cool slightly before slicing thinly and serving.

  9. #9
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Goat Gyro, using above recipe, cooked on rotisserie instead, served with cucumber sauce and homemade flat bread.

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    Smile

    Well, I am convinced there are some skanky goats out there. My goat was younger a 4 year old billy and tender and sweet as veal. On the other hand, some guys say they shot big billies they couldnt eat. I know with some really gamey poorly shot meat I marinated it overnight is something tenderizing like vinegar, wine or italian dressing and the next day was tasty. Also stick it in the crock pot on low all day in marinade and the toughest meat will be tender.
    I come home with an honestly earned feeling that something good has taken place. It makes no difference whether I got anything, it has to do with how the day was spent. Fred Bear

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sollybug View Post
    Well, I am convinced there are some skanky goats out there. My goat was younger a 4 year old billy and tender and sweet as veal. On the other hand, some guys say they shot big billies they couldnt eat. I know with some really gamey poorly shot meat I marinated it overnight is something tenderizing like vinegar, wine or italian dressing and the next day was tasty. Also stick it in the crock pot on low all day in marinade and the toughest meat will be tender.
    I agree. The cooking method is important.

    If you can handle spicy ... try the vindaloo curry mix on sale at New Sagaya. Follow the instructions on the back of the package. I use the mix with onion, tomatoes and carrots and various game meats. At first, the meat will seem tough. Cook on simmer for a couple of hours and the meat will start to break down and become more tender.

    For comparison - Goat can be had from the menu at the Yak and Yeti (Anchorage) on mondays. Haven't been there in a while though... so I hope they are still open.

  12. #12
    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    Yummy! I'm certainly looking for more creative ways to prepare the harvest.
    This will do.

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