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Thread: Moose for the old time Alaskan and mountain top bulls

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    Member tlingitwarrior's Avatar
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    Default Moose for the old time Alaskan and mountain top bulls

    The first hunt I ever did with my dad was in 1981, he drew Delta Bison, and he shot a super nice bull. We started doing annual hunts in the early 90’s, right after I got out of college. Over the past 25 years we’ve done annual moose hunts, a couple bison hunts and a few caribou hunts up the Denali.

    A couple years ago I did what I thought was the last moose hunt with my Dad . It was the hunt where I was “stalked” by a grizzly on three separate occasions, and we finally ended up shooting the big bruin right in camp on the last night of the hunt. I wrote about this several months ago.

    Our annual moose hunts are what you would consider extreme logistical hunts. We travel a long way, through extremely rugged conditions, using very rugged means of transportation – in multiple forms. Due to the huge challenges and our equipment, we are able to access virgin areas with no hunting pressure and great game populations.

    Well my dad is 74, and diabetic, but fairly fit. This year my younger brother (Californian who hadn’t hunted with us in 14 years) joined our moose parade, along with another family member and a forum member. A week before the hunt I was successful in talking the old man into joining the group for one last hurrah.

    Four days into the hunt and I tagged our first moose, a nice bull that went 56 inches and 3x4. One down, one to go. We were seeing lots of animals, several shooter bulls, but nothing really gave the old man an opportunity to tag what would most likely be his last moose. Case in point, I witnessed a 40 inch bull and cow walk a ridge to a mountain top that was darn near 5,000 feet.

    We were having extremely warm weather and we are worried about meat spoilage, so we decided to cut our trip short by two days. Don’t worry; the old man quips on our last day, we’ll get something. About 10 am that morning we spot a super nice bull. He’s 3x3 but certainly wide enough. We only get a 10 minute glimpse and he ghosts back into the woods. Oh well, I guess we are down to our last evening he says. Like most areas, we are early morning and late evening hunters, following the typical moose pattern.

    About 2:30 Dad decides to take his customary afternoon nap. Looking over the killing fields we notice a cow and calf heading down the trail. Five minutes later I spot a flash of horns. Could it be? Yep, big bull is out and on the move. The cow is leading him to slaughter. I run to roust the old fart out of bed. He quickly dresses and runs down the trail with the other forum member. My family member and I follow them a few minutes later to make sure we have full force in case the bull changes gears and gets off track of the normal trail.

    "Urgh", "Urgh", we can hear the bull grunt with each step, on the usual trail, which is 150 yards to our left. Its remarkably similar to the sound of a 74 year old man huffing it down the alder infested trail. Dad gets in position at our customary stump, “urgh” “urgh” continues the bull, heading down the path. He gives us the slip momentarily by taking a higher trial. To the right we see the cow and calf in the opening ~ waiting. The other forum member and I decide to head down the trail further in case he doesn’t present a shot to dad. Just as we’re in place, the bull steps into an opening.

    Crack goes the old man’s .308, sending 165 grains of Nosler partition through the bull's boiler room. Another follow-up to the ribs and his bull is down. He measures 57 on the nose and has the biggest bases of any moose I've seen.

    I often tell my wife that nobody can rub you the wrong way like family can. My relationship with dad is no different. We are both stubburn mules and we often get on each others nerves. No matter how many times I tell myself to let it go, it always happens on our hunting trips. This trip was no different. But looking back, the time we spend together is very special, and you never appreciate it during the momement.

    It was an incredible thrill to be part of this hunt, sharing the experience with my dad and my brother and another forum member who is heck of nice guy. The old man has 60 years of Alaska stories, and every year we hear new ones. I will treasure those stories long after he is gone.

    Packing up the last day, with two days of hard work until we are home, my dad tells me “if I’m alive next year, I’ll join you again. I sure hope that is the case. Good Job Dad! You never cease to amaze.
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    What a great story - thanks for sharing. You're a lucky man to have all those memories of family hunts together

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    Member martentrapper's Avatar
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    Great story Tlingit. I see the mode of transportation in the background. Looks like a cadillac to me!
    You probably can't get along with dad cuz he's always shooting the bigger moose! Haha.
    I can't help being a lazy, dumb, weekend warrior.......I have a JOB!
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    Member Birdstrike's Avatar
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    Very, Very cool. I was also fortunate to hunt with my Dad this year and hope to several more times.

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    Member Hunt'N'Photos's Avatar
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    That is what it's all about! Thanks for sharing and congrats!
    US Air Force - retired and Wildlife photographer

    To follow my photography adventures check out my facebook page

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Man, I certainly hope I get to share one or two more hunts like that with my own father. Very good stuff, sir. Thank you for sharing.

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    WOW great story and congrats on the success...

    As for getting along with your dad I can tell you my dad died when I was 21 and it will be 20 years ago this july and to me it seems like yesturday....

    My dad took me hunting and fishing before I could even walk.. I cant remember those days but I will never forget the times when I was older....

    I didnt always get along with him either and he was a stubborn hard hard working tough man that I never saw him quit anything..
    I love him and think about him every time I go into the outdoors.

    So the moral of the story is get along and relish every moment because if you dont you will regret it..

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    Member SEEBLAZE's Avatar
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    Awsome story thanks for sharing!!

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    Member Lone Wolf1's Avatar
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    Super story! Congrats on the hunt and the opportunity to spend time with Dad.

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    Great article. Wish I could still hunt with my dad. Be sure you appreciate it.

    How did he manage to kill a moose with a 308. Everyone knows that is too light for moose. You will probably tell us it has a blued action and barrel and a wood stock also.
    NRA Life Member since 1974

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    Member Smokey's Avatar
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    Thx for sharing tlingW, as one goes thru life you find very little you do really has much importance in the "big picture" and the truly important memories are time spent with your family. I seldom remember the squables my son and I get into but I sure remember the "hugs" we share! Glad your Pops is still get'n it done! Congrats!
    What is that big wheeled contraption anyway???
    When asked what state I live in I say "The State of Confusion", better known as IL....

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    Sure like to see more of the Big wheel rig....
    Thanks

    Love the good old 308...

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    Moderator kingfisherktn's Avatar
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    Nice job and great family memories. BTW, did you ever make it down here for your deer hunt?

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    That is a great time, Congratulations!
    Hopefully MD wasn't too much trouble for you up there.

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    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
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    Good job writing up your hunt report and thanks for sharing your experiences with your father, no mater how irritating or trying times with dad can be we all still cherish them. Good luck next season!

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    Nice job Tlingitwarrior! Congrats to you and your dad! Wish I could have hooked up with you on your way through or out!

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    very nice story & great bull

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    Member tlingitwarrior's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the kind words and responses. I've found that writting about the hunt helps to cement the memories in the mind.

    boliep & Tundra Jim ~ we love the .308. My son shot his first moose with it this year. Its been in the family since my mother was given the gun at a Potlach in the late 70's. It has been kind of forgotten in the safe for some time. Dad actually hunted moose and caribou for 30 years with a puny 30/40 Krag and 300 Savage, so this was a step up

    Lots of questions about the hunting rig ~ they are a special, special vehicle
    In 1492 Native Americans discovered Columbus lost at sea
    _________________________________________________

    If I come across as an arrogant, know-it-all jerk, it's because I am

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    Member pike_palace's Avatar
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    Good stuff. I hope I can hunt with my dad for that long and be able to write about it.

    No pics of your bull?
    "Ya can't stop a bad guy with a middle finger and a bag of quarters!!!!"- Ted Nugent.

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    Member tlingitwarrior's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pike_palace View Post
    Good stuff. I hope I can hunt with my dad for that long and be able to write about it.

    No pics of your bull?
    Here's mine.
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    In 1492 Native Americans discovered Columbus lost at sea
    _________________________________________________

    If I come across as an arrogant, know-it-all jerk, it's because I am

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