Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 24

Thread: Hewescraft Sea Runner 220 with Canvas or Hardtop--advice needed

  1. #1
    New member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Chugiak
    Posts
    14

    Default Hewescraft Sea Runner 220 with Canvas or Hardtop--advice needed

    Buying first ocean boat, wondering if giving up the space to a hardtop for protection from weather is worth the added weight in the boat. Does the canvas enclosure do a fair enough job protecting from the elements for halibut fishing, camping, dipnetting, etc. in Alaska? Will do fishing mostly April - Sept., Us plus, 2-3 kids, depending.

    Also considering the hardtop with the fish curtain instead of the locking door...


    Thanks

  2. #2

    Default

    This summer I bought a 22 Ocean Pro hard top and love it. It does a great job protecting you from the elements. You won't regret the hard top.

  3. #3
    Member Dan in Alaska's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    854

    Default

    I am a big fan of hard tops, as well, because they offer more than just protection from the elements. A hard top gives you a lot more options for storage, rod holders, mounting antennas, and hauling stuff.

  4. #4
    New member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    2,022

    Default

    I am/have been considering the same thing for my 22' inboard jet in the sense that I may replace the canvas top with a hard top. If I decide to go hardtop it will have a rear drop curtain rather than a bulkhead due to weight and space restrictions. If I stay canvas I will add a cargo rack above for carrying capacity/storage, rod holders, shrimp pot, rubber duck etc.

    As far as protection from the elements the canvas does a fine job for camping etc., we camp in PWS whenever we have the chance and have never wished we had a hardtop in that regard. The canvas obviously weighs much, much less and allows for a wind in the hair experience on those warm sunny days if so desired, something the HT cannot provide.

    One distinct advantage allowed by a hardtop would be interior heating,, you could easily install a direct vent heater for the cockpit to use while on the hook/overnight to keep the family more comfortable.

    The weight on a hardtop with a drop curtain should come in around 300lbs. The entire canvas camper top (full length, windshield to transom), side curtains, doors etc. for my boat if weighed in total, I am guessing, would come in only at about 30-40lbs if that. An added cargo rack is a weight unknown to me, too variable based design/ construction, though guessing I would think a sturdy rack would make it inside 50-100lbs easily.

  5. #5
    Member Jimw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    452

    Default

    We had a Sea runner 22 with a hard top. Sweet!!!! I wish my jet had a hard top...
    2005 20' Weldcraft Sabre XL 350 MP
    SD309 AT
    2009 Polaris Dragon 800 163
    Custom Mod's

  6. #6
    New member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Chugiak
    Posts
    14

    Default

    Thanks, yep, leaning toward fish curtain with hard top. Can't imagine regretting it. Thought maybe getting the curtain instead of bulkhead might bring capacity from 7 to 8 people, if family visits, although too crowded for general use. Might have to hurl someone over to make room for fish and cooler.

    Appreciate comments. Any additional insight welcome. Handing over $50K for first boat seems like a large learning curve. Might see a few more posts regarding that

  7. #7
    Member Dan in Alaska's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    854

    Default

    If you're looking at spending $50K, I'd look at the used market first. You can get a lot more boat for your money, and you should be able to score a used 22-ft hardtop for less than $40K.

    I like having the bulkhead vs. the drop curtain for security. I feel better being able to lock my fishing gear in the boat.

  8. #8
    New member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Chugiak
    Posts
    14

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dan in Alaska View Post
    If you're looking at spending $50K, I'd look at the used market first. You can get a lot more boat for your money, and you should be able to score a used 22-ft hardtop for less than $40K.
    Buying used, how can you be sure of safety and performance? At least new, you have warrantees to fall back on, and professionals who are willing/paid to help you. Putting something in the water when you aren't sure where it has been and how it's been handled makes me a bit skeptical. I'm not very trusting.

  9. #9
    Member jrogers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,539

    Default

    I used to have a hard top boat with a curtain back. The thing I really did not like about it was leaving it in a parking lot, either for the night or for dinner with radios, GPS, expensive fishing gear, etc. Especially after I heard about a guy loosing gear out of the camping lot in Seward at night a few years back.
    2009 Seawolf 31'
    www.seawolfmarine.com
    Fully Loaded

  10. #10
    Member Frostbitten's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Alaska - I wasn't born here, but I got here as soon as I could!
    Posts
    3,279

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AlaskaPickle View Post
    Thanks, yep, leaning toward fish curtain with hard top. Can't imagine regretting it. Thought maybe getting the curtain instead of bulkhead might bring capacity from 7 to 8 people, if family visits, although too crowded for general use. Might have to hurl someone over to make room for fish and cooler.

    Appreciate comments. Any additional insight welcome. Handing over $50K for first boat seems like a large learning curve. Might see a few more posts regarding that
    7-8 people on a 22 ft boat is crowded for any use. In any case, the only regret to the hard top is not getting one. If weight is an issue, opt for a larger motor, but don't scrimp on the hard top is you can avaoid it.

  11. #11
    Member Dan in Alaska's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    854

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AlaskaPickle View Post
    Buying used, how can you be sure of safety and performance? At least new, you have warrantees to fall back on, and professionals who are willing/paid to help you. Putting something in the water when you aren't sure where it has been and how it's been handled makes me a bit skeptical. I'm not very trusting.
    If you're not sure what you're looking at, buying a used boat could be a scary thing. Take someone with you to act as an extra set of eyes when you look at a used boat.

    I've owned two Hewescrafts - the first (22' hardtop) I bought brand new, and the second one (26' Alaskan) I bought used. I know and like Hewescrafts, so I wouldn't hesitate to buy another used one if I liked what I saw. If you'd like, send me a PM, and I'd be happy to look at some used boats with you.

    I had some issues with the new boat. The anchor light didn't work when I got it (dealer fixed it). Later, a wiper motor started blowing fuses (dealer fixed it). I also had an entire summer plagued with engine troubles that cost me five trips to the shop and several hundred dollars out of my own pocket (dealer wouldn't cover it under warrantee). Another shop finally took care of the problem for good (this dealer did cover it under warrantee), and I ran another four seasons without a hitch before selling the boat to a friend of mine (he hasn't had any issues). But even if I'd have paid for every single repair out of my own pocket, it wouldn't have cost me anywhere near $10K to fix. Ten grand is a lot of money, so don't be too eager to give it away for a "warrantee" on a new boat. There is no guarantee with a new boat.

  12. #12
    New member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Chugiak
    Posts
    14

    Default

    Yes, 7-8 people is way too many. Even for a short trip and one or two of them are only to your armpits. I figure the most annoying big person gets strapped to the roof, all the better to go hardtop.

    Great advice about security. My four-legged security system is 140lbs and won't be constrained by canvas alone in a parking lot. Really taking this all in. Little details matter.

  13. #13
    New member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Chugiak
    Posts
    14

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dan in Alaska View Post
    I've owned two Hewescrafts - the first (22' hardtop) I bought brand new, and the second one (26' Alaskan) I bought used. I know and like Hewescrafts, so I wouldn't hesitate to buy another used one if I liked what I saw. If you'd like, send me a PM, and I'd be happy to look at some used boats with you.
    That's a generous offer. We may take you up on that. Boat shows are coming up, so that will be tempting. We are preparing to add this to our budget in Spring, however, so used would not be worth looking at until then. However, there is ONE we have been eyeing...on Craigslist in Valdez. Too much of a drive for something we *might* like. Bummer.

  14. #14
    Member Jimw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    452

    Default

    I went with new on my new jet boat mostly because if I was going to put the family in there I was going to take a chance on the
    Possibility of a jurry rigged repair I did not catch go bad and put the family at risk. I know there is quite a difference between ocean and river but the risk is the same. Family went new with the 22' sea runner as well. Good luck
    2005 20' Weldcraft Sabre XL 350 MP
    SD309 AT
    2009 Polaris Dragon 800 163
    Custom Mod's

  15. #15

    Default

    I bought my 2006 used, the only issues I had were small issues the manufacturer built into it so new would not have helped.

    One was the door, it dosen't open flat against the bulkhead which steals space from the back deck, here is a pic of my fix

    I removed the door and installed a plastic curtain that zips on both sides but rolls up out of the way when not needed.
    It can easily be returned to original.

  16. #16
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default

    Another vote for a hard top. I'd also say it is well worth the time and $ to educate yourself on what to look for in a used boat, and to spend the time looking at many boats.

    As to the 22' boat for taking 7-8 people out, it really is too small of a boat. My boat is the same basic layout, 22' cabin cruiser and while I thought it would be ideal for a family of 5 for multi day trips, it really is too small of a boat. It's a great size for 4 people to fish out of for day trips, or for 2-3 people to take multi day trips. I've gone out several times with 4 adults and 2 kids, and that seems like an ok number for a day trip.

    I think for your use, you'd be much, much happier with a 26' boat, and you can find used boats in your budget if you spend some serious time looking.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

  17. #17
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    712

    Default

    Hardtop is a no-brainer. Hard rear bulkhead also. Four stroke outboard power as well.

    Don't expect to buy a boat, used or new, and stop spending money at that point. Something will always need fixing or upgrading. With new or used hewes, start with a complete rewire of critical systems using marine tinned wire and blue seas switches/combiners/breakers/panels, and you're getting somewhere. You'll learn a lot in the process.

    Few boat builders get the wiring part right from the start, and they're likely outside of your budget. Better read up and expect to contribute some elbow grease. Very little boat work is difficult or complicated - it just takes time. Modern outboard engine work can be an exception, but it really isn't hard to change spark plugs, oil+filter, and lower unit oil.

  18. #18
    Member Sobie2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Juneau
    Posts
    1,039

    Default

    I had a Hewescraft 220 OceanPro with a hard top and loved it. The SeaRunner is a totally different boat being narrower. There was a huge difference between the two as the OceanPro was more stable at rest when fishing. The SeaRunner was noticibly more tippy/rolly then the OceanPro. Hard top is the only way to go. You can spend either a day cold, in rain gear with a canvas or be warm and comfy and dry in a hard top.

    I have been looking around and a 22' SeaRunner canvas is a $35k used boat and a hard top is $40. And It is definately worth the extra. Remember a new canvas is probalby $2,500 (maybe) and lasts 5-10 years so look at doing it a few times. Plus snow loads can crush the thing and cold temps can crack the plastic windows.

    I miss my OceanPro like you wouldn't believe. (sold it for a house building project)

    Sobie2

  19. #19
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Wasilly
    Posts
    60

    Default

    I've been thinking about doing the same thing. Looks great - did you do it yourself and somebody do it?
    Quote Originally Posted by Jonsboat View Post
    I bought my 2006 used, the only issues I had were small issues the manufacturer built into it so new would not have helped.

    One was the door, it dosen't open flat against the bulkhead which steals space from the back deck, here is a pic of my fix

    I removed the door and installed a plastic curtain that zips on both sides but rolls up out of the way when not needed.
    It can easily be returned to original.

  20. #20
    Member IceKing02's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    552

    Default

    This is a question to ponder? Total no-brainer for your price range. Get a 150hp Ocean Pro with the second steering station and install an air-ride driver/passenger seat, good electronics, and whatever amenities suit you best. Then, don't ever sell the darn thing. Ever. Consider used just as seriously as a new machine. Most people don't use them enough to wear them out. It is more neglect than overuse that you'll have to search out.

    See you on the water!

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •