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Thread: Lessons learned from my last weekend of moose hunting this year

  1. #1

    Default Lessons learned from my last weekend of moose hunting this year

    Spent today out and about on the Lower Kenai Peninsula taking advantage of my last day of moose hunting for the year. Covered a lot of ground both walking and driving and saw a few things that were pretty interesting to me.

    1.) The number of hunters on the peninsula seems to be way down from past years. I'm sure a lot of people have chosen to hunt different locations because of the new regulations. I can't really get off of work this time of year, so I stay close to home...

    2.) Even with lower numbers of hunters, the moose seem to have been pressured out of some of their normal habitat. Where I normally see good numbers of moose throughout the year, I haven't seen many at all in the last week. Pressure, pressure, pressure.

    3.) Grouse are out and about in decent numbers, but most are still small. I only chased the big ones, and no good shots presented themselves. Oh well. Was nice to see good numbers of birds.

    4.) Make sure to keep a couple of ziplock bags with you for berry picking, because...

    5.) The grouse that I chased off the road took me on fun chases through the woods right over some good lowbush cranberry patches. I picked more than enough for a few more jars of preserves and to serve with the roast I was planning on having for dinner tonight. That's the type of reward I like; hunt the right way (no ground swatting grouse on the roads) and they lead you to something tasty.

    6.) The reward of being out in the woods is great whether or not you bring home game.

    Good luck and good hunting to all through the end of the season. Hopefully I can get a buddy of mine or two to go chase bears with me soon, but if not, I'm excited for a fall of grouse and ducks!

  2. #2
    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by border collies View Post

    6.) The reward of being out in the woods is great whether or not you bring home game.
    Truer words couldn't be spoken....

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    Member tyrex13's Avatar
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    I was down shooting at Snowshoe today and saw 2 small bulls walk by the treeline at the end of the range, then later another small bull and cow. There are always moose out there during hunting season, but usually just cows and calves. It would be great if the moose population is improved down there through this management.

  4. #4

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    Yes sir, #6 is very good.

    If I based my success or if I am enjoying a hunt on whether or not we bag a critter or not, man I'd have a lot of disappointing unenjoyable hunts.

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    #6

    I have spent many great days in the mountains taking my gun/gear for a walk and have never regretted any of them.
    "No battle plan ever survives first contact with the enemy" - Unknown
    Literal Translation:
    "Everyone has a plan, until they get punched in the face" - Mike Tyson

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    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    Fine post. Thanks for sharing.
    The best revelations are simple.

  7. #7
    Member Akheloce's Avatar
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    I chose to hike this weekend in the woods. I'm a hunter, and really want some more moose in the freezer, but chose to hike instead of hunt (pistol for protection only). I realize that they curtailed the hunting with the 4 brow tine requirement, and eliminating the spike fork allowance, but I truely believe that a more restrictive hunt is necessary in 15C. I live in 15C, away from town, and off grid. I'm an avid hunter, and proponent of hunting rights, but down here, we've just had too much pressure. In past years, I've seen any manner of swamp buggy tearing up the trail, making lots of noise, and generally ruining the hunt and or general living experience of those in the Caribou Hills. I whole heartedly agree that a person should use the means necessary to make a succesful hunt, but there must be a balance both between the methods used, and the number of people accessing the area. I personally would like a 3-5 year moratorium on bull moose in 15C, to allow the prime moose to repopulate, and to discourage the masses from descending on the area.

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    Member Smokey's Avatar
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    Nice post Border Collies - Enjoying the outdoors and being "flexable" has many rewards for sure. Sunday morning I chose to do a squirrel hunt - a bit windy and spitting rain - too much movement to spot bushytails in the heavy foliage so I started to leave after a cpl hours. Then as I was driving out I saw several doves working a food plot I had out - Hmm shotgun was in the back - had ammo - why not! Ended up sitting in a light rain and brought home enough doves for a meal! Always options if one just looks around a bit!
    Best part of the day was having 2 very nice white tail bucks walk past me while looking for squirrels - 2 more weeks and I will have a bow in my hands and they better watch out then!
    When asked what state I live in I say "The State of Confusion", better known as IL....

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    I would be out today looking for that restricted moose (4 brow tines or over 50" and then sealed by ADFG) if I hadn't been kept from doing so by the fact that we put in for the Unit 13 caribou deal and didn't have time to do hardcore moose hunting in that unit. I don't fully understand that restriction and feel it was damaging to Unit 13. Why not hunt for caribou one place and moose another? Was it enacted so as to discourage too many people from applying for the Tier 1 thingy? If so, I think it may have backfired by concentrating too many hunters in one place over a longer period of time in order to harvest both species.

    I have pretty much given up focusing on the pen for moose, though in the past couple years I have enjoyed taking a day off for the closing of the season. There was always the chance (if I hadn't already gotten one) that I would luck out with a legal moose in the eleventh hour. Not this year.

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