Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: grayling

  1. #1
    Member aktyler's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    North pole
    Posts
    304

    Default grayling

    anyone know why grayling in flowing waters seem to have much larger fins than pond/lake grayling?

  2. #2
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Eagle River/ Juneau
    Posts
    5,154

    Default

    I'd say they aren't.

    what I do know is bigger fins are found on males than females
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  3. #3
    Member aktyler's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    North pole
    Posts
    304

    Default

    i dont agree.... the fish i catch in the chena have much larger fins than those i get from the pit behind my house.... maybe an age thing as well?

  4. #4

    Default

    I'm not a biologist but if a fish lives where it has to swim against current (flowing water) they would get bigger. You know... Like they spend their lives working against the current instead of sitting around in a lake. Kind of like me riding the bicycle to work instead of taking the truck. Legs got bigger...

  5. #5
    Member akiceman25's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Two Rivers, AK
    Posts
    1,284

    Default

    I assume the pit is stocked? Could be the genetics of the stocked brood.... Along with Fly Guys comment, give it a few years, you'll have whitefish! Ha!

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Two Rivers, AK
    Posts
    745

    Default

    I'd also say it's an age thing. I've caught some biggies way upstream and smallies way downstream (Chena) and the younger fish in the river look pretty much like the younger fish in the ponds.

  7. #7
    Member muzzyman87's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    AK
    Posts
    311

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ak_powder_monkey View Post
    I'd say they aren't.

    what I do know is bigger fins are found on males than females
    Correct. Do you know why? I think it has something to do with the spawn...
    I am not against the flippin kenai, since I cannot but suspect it keeps armies of the unworthy from discovering every other stream... ~Paul O'Neil~/~Wyo2AK~

  8. #8
    Member FishGod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Fishing your hole before you get there
    Posts
    1,948

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by muzzyman87 View Post
    Correct. Do you know why? I think it has something to do with the spawn...
    Yes, the males have a larger dorsal fin which is a secondary sexual characteristic. This is a form of sexual dimorphism. So yes gentlemen, size does matter.
    Your bait stinks and your boat is ugly

  9. #9
    Member FishGod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Fishing your hole before you get there
    Posts
    1,948

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by akiceman25 View Post
    I assume the pit is stocked? Could be the genetics of the stocked brood.... Along with Fly Guys comment, give it a few years, you'll have whitefish! Ha!
    The broodstock for stocked grayling is the Chena.
    Your bait stinks and your boat is ugly

  10. #10
    Member FishGod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Fishing your hole before you get there
    Posts
    1,948

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Alaskan Fly Guy View Post
    I'm not a biologist but if a fish lives where it has to swim against current (flowing water) they would get bigger. You know... Like they spend their lives working against the current instead of sitting around in a lake. Kind of like me riding the bicycle to work instead of taking the truck. Legs got bigger...
    No, it has to do with age and sex type.
    Your bait stinks and your boat is ugly

  11. #11
    Member willphish4food's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Willow, AK
    Posts
    3,368

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Alaskan Fly Guy View Post
    I'm not a biologist but if a fish lives where it has to swim against current (flowing water) they would get bigger. You know... Like they spend their lives working against the current instead of sitting around in a lake. Kind of like me riding the bicycle to work instead of taking the truck. Legs got bigger...
    Gotta disagree with ya on this. While athletes have bigger muscles than couch potatoes, couch potatoes get heavier. The easier a fish's life is, the bigger it will grow. Its all about the food source, and how much effort is required to obtain it. For grayling, they get bigger fins the bigger they get. If FishGod's correct, and age also plays a role in fin size, then a fast growing 16" grayling will have a smaller fin than an older, slow growing 16" grayling.

    Feed, genetics, age and habitat likely all play a role in fin development.

  12. #12
    Member FishGod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Fishing your hole before you get there
    Posts
    1,948

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by willphish4food View Post
    Gotta disagree with ya on this. While athletes have bigger muscles than couch potatoes, couch potatoes get heavier. The easier a fish's life is, the bigger it will grow. Its all about the food source, and how much effort is required to obtain it. For grayling, they get bigger fins the bigger they get. If FishGod's correct, and age also plays a role in fin size, then a fast growing 16" grayling will have a smaller fin than an older, slow growing 16" grayling.

    Feed, genetics, age and habitat likely all play a role in fin development.

    When I was referring to age, I meant an older grayling is usually going to be bigger than a younger grayling and thus have a larger dorsal fin. If you have a 5 year old 16 inch male and a 9 year old 16 inch male, they will both roughly have the same size dorsal fin.
    Your bait stinks and your boat is ugly

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •