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Thread: para tarp v Golite 3

  1. #1
    Member Alaskan22's Avatar
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    Default para tarp v Golite 3

    Alright, title says it all. Ordered up a Kifaru Para tarp (with annex) but it woudln't get here in time for my goat hunt so I canceled the order. Originally I wanted the Golite ShangriLa 3, but for some reason didn't go that route.

    so, for you all that have them, time to chime in. I'm getting one for my 'packable tent', just deciding on which.

    *note, treking poles will be used on the trip...just incase that was a future question.
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  2. #2
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    I don't know how much help I am, but I have spent a couple of nights under a SL-3. It was nice weather with little wind (sorry no durability tests) and set up was easier than I had previously heard. I use trekking poles as well. It is also worth mentioning soft/grassy ground is a must (harder to find than I originally thought). I am not sure know how much of a factor that is for you, maybe not at all. I know you can tie out to rocks and whatnot, but I think that would be a pain. Size wise it was fine for two 6 footers w/ minimal gear inside (daypack size). It could have fit our hunting packs and us, but then it would have been very tight in my opinion.

  3. #3
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    The SL3 sure is hard to beat when golite puts them on sale @ 40% off over the winter!

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    Member OHTroy's Avatar
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    My first trip out in my SL-3 we got caught in an early season snow storm north of the brooks range. High winds and soft tundra (it was early august) the tepee held up great. Just used the eight stakes it came with. Three of us spent 22 hours inside with wind hitting the tent making it so loud inside we could not talk to each other. I was very impressed with how well it stuck to the ground with the force of the wind.
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    Member tyrex13's Avatar
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    I have the SL-3 and was going to offer to let you check it out, but see you are in Nome. If you come to town I'd be happy to set it up in the yard.

  6. #6

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    Plus one for the SL-3 (Simple, easy to operate).

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    Member tiger15's Avatar
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    Are there any issues with condensation with either of these? Obviously, I do not own, but I may order one soon. Thanks!

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    It is a single wall tent and water will condense on it just like any piece of fabric when it hits the dew point. I don't see any teepee that doesn't have a liner being able to prevent that from happening. That said I spent about 6 days in my SL5 north side of the Brooks this fall and it dried out each morning and I was dry in it as long as I didn't rub up against the sides. Using the mid wall guy out tabs helps a good bit both for added wind resistance and to give you more shoulder room and keep you from rubbing against the sides. I ordered the hilliberg style tensioners from bearpaw tents and highly recommend them. The guy line was the kelty stuff available in 50' lengths at REI and sportsmans. I also upgraded to the groundhog aluminum stakes which are a great compromise of weight vs strength. Coghill makes a 9" similar stake but they are a weaker metal and I bent several trying to drive them in with a rock-hammer.

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    Member tccak71's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    The SL3 sure is hard to beat when golite puts them on sale @ 40% off over the winter!
    Is the sale usually December-ish? How do you get a discount code? I want an SL5 and don't want to pony-up $350 or whatever.
    Tim

  10. #10

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    I have seen both the para tarp and SL-3 in action, though I have only slept in the SL-3 so take it for what its worth.

    My man purpose of the SL-3 is a lightweight solo tent or a emergency shelter to carry in the pack. At 1 pound 14 oz for the tent, with all the guy lines tied on to it, and 12 stakes it isn't as light as the para tarp no doubt. However, it is completely enclosed when the door is shut so if setup in shifting winds you won't have to re-orient the shelter to prevent a parachute effect as you would with the para tarp. Also the hexagonal shape of the tent sheds the wind very well. And for the 60 sq ft of oasis it provides out of the wind/rain at less than 2 pounds (if you use your trekking poles as a center pole) its worth the weight in my pack.

    The para tarp is lighter than the SL-3 no doubt. At around 1 pound 2 oz for all the stakes and guyout lines if using trekking poles as well. Also a tarp is a very versatile piece of gear to serve more purposes than just a shelter as well. But the fact that it isn't completely enclosed to get you out of all the wind/rain especially in misting conditions is what steered me away from it. Plus I also prefer the simply tipi design for its ability to shed the wind.

    The SL-3 is slight cheaper (if you use the coupon code to pick it up with stakes for $165), but heavier at nearly twice the weight.

    The Paratarp is lighter and for $25 more ($188 for the paratarp vs. $165 for the SL-3) and you still have to purchase stakes for the paratarp.

    Here is a couple pics from on of my August sheep hunts using the SL-3.

    The first is a pic I snapped after setting up to SL-3 to get out of the sleet for a few hours waiting for the fog to clear several miles from camp. Nice to crawl inside out of the wind/rain and cook up some hot tea or coco and listen to the sleet/hail come down, totally worth the nearly 2 pounds in the pack right then and there

    The second pic is the morning after my wife and I bivied out 7-8 miles from our base camp to look over some other drainages we wanted to look for sheep. The two of us easily fit on one side of the center pole so I know in a pinch 4 guys could bivy in there if needed if they left their packs outside and two guys could easily use it as a primary tent if they desired with their gear inside. 3 guys as a main tent in the SL-3 I would was would be a serious no no though. We "shared" a 8 oz foam pad, 19 oz down quilt, all under the 30 oz shelter. Thats 3.5 pounds totally worth carrying in my pack, in addition to our puffy pants and coat to make a miserable night away from camp a little less miserable for my wife. Of course we all know how the "sharing" of the quilt and pad went down.



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