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Thread: Regrets over having trawler-type boat?

  1. #1

    Default Regrets over having trawler-type boat?

    Ever had (or have) a trawler style boat and wish you hadn't? Mainly regarding having only the weekend to be out on the water and spending too much of that time going 8 knots.

  2. #2
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    I mostly day boat out of Seward now so have a smaller but faster boat to get out to the fishing grounds and back. When I boated in Whittier we had a much larger but slower boat that was suited for weekends or weeks out at a time. Nothing like bringing the house with you when cruising! Full size fridge, 7.5kW diesel genset, diesel furnace, a separate stateroom for the kids, full size stove with oven to cook dinner while underway. Depends on what you want to do but those were some of the best days on the water for my family.

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    Member coho slayer's Avatar
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    Over the years my dad went through the usual boat-buying pattern: Small cabin cruiser (22'), bigger but used (24'), bigger still but new (27'), and then he blew the retirement on a 32' Nordic Tug. VERY nice boat, VERY slow boat. It definitely made the weekend trips shorter. He went from boating all over to pretty much spending all time on the water between Homer and Seldovia. It just depends on what you want out of it, I think. He's not a fisherman, he just goes out and anchors up somewhere pretty and hangs out...to him, that's enough.

    For me, it was maddening. Halibut fishing became more of a well, we can go 20 miles because that's all the time we have.....arrrrggghhh.....that's not going to cut it when I finally get my boat.

    We had a 27' Sea Sport Pilot that I loved. It had speed and decent size, and the interior was one of the most well-thought out designs I've seen to date. I wish he would have never sold that boat.

  4. #4

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    There is is depends on what you like, some go way farther than needed but thats them. Had a guy pull up to the dock in Whittier with 4ea 30 pound butt's, he commented on our 2ea 100 poundes, He said he went 65 miles one way I went maybe 20. And had Silvers a Small King Shrimp and Rock Fish.
    Me I'd do the Nordic Tug because even when mine will do 24mph I go 10mph. It's a good time not a race to me.

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    Member spoiled one's Avatar
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    I think you made up your own mind when you said that you would be using it on the weekends mainly. You will also be limiting your self to one port for all practical reasons. Once every day becomes a Saturday, a trawler makes a lot of sense, but you can be comfortable in a "go fast" type boat as well. We are.
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

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    Member akblackdawg's Avatar
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    We had 2 trawler type boats, a 36 ft single and then a 41' twin. Loved the comfort even though there were generally just 2 of us. Bought both in seattle area and brought them up quite easily. Kept both in whittier, could leave anch after work on a friday nite and be in hidden cove by midnight. Had to plan ahead to have extra days off to make a trip across PWS. Really wanted a faster boat but the comfort was nice, and the economy of better then 1-2 mile per gal of fuel. Thing about faster boats, many get simular economy but since you have the time, you always go further and so it cost you more. Bud
    Wasilla

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    My father's charter boat was a trawler type, 12 knots, my cousins charter boat, 25-30 knots. They fished the same places together with all the other charter boats day in day out. Whenever the boats got there limits was when they could head in. If they all left at the same time guess who would be a couple hours later arriving at the dock? It can make for a long day running charters, but not that much difference if you are just a pleasure craft out for the weekend with the family. Personally, if I could have a giant trawler like a Nordic Tug I would trade my 25 knot boat, I just don't go that far out so I would be fine with a little slower but more comfortable boat. Besides, if you catch all your fish early you can head in and arrive the same time as if you caught all your fish late and speeded in.

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    Member breausaw's Avatar
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    The other major factor in choosing a trawler type boat is storage and moorage. That's the one reason we arenít hip on owning a boat thatís not trailerable, we like having our boat parked in the driveway for convenience and excitability . A good alternative would be a mini-trawler like the Ranger tug 25, 27 or 29. They all have an 8.5í beam so no oversize restrictions, can hit 20+ knots and are extremely roomy and comfortable.
    We've seen a few in PWS and talked to some owners, they love these boats.
    Jay
    07 C-Dory 25 Cruiser
    OurPlayground.


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    Member Sobie2's Avatar
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    Two years ago I helped a family friend who was dying sell his 26' Allweather. He bought it new and kept it pristine. In the end I had to do sea trials for buyers and even a short sea trial was 2 hours on that 6.5 knot boat!


    I grew up on my Dad's 21' hand troller that did 13 knots WOT. Even with today's fuel prices I want something that can cruise 15 knots or better.


    8 knot boats are for spending serious time out on the water for either money makers or retired folks. If you are a weekend warrior I'd be looking for something that does 15 knots or better. If you can do 3 day weekends all summer long then 8 knots may be ok.

    Finally an 8 knot boat had better be over 30 feet, 40 is better because you are going to have to ride out the stuff you get caught in. Here in Southeast even on sunny days that afternoon blow with the right tide can kick up 6 footers.

    Sobie2

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    Member IceKing02's Avatar
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    Skydiver,

    The trawler is for people that have time and comfort as their most important ingredients for traveling. I'd much rather go faster, burn more fuel, and see more in the little time that I have available to spend on the water each weekend. PM me and we'll take you and the First Mate out for a weekend. I'm sure you'll agree afterwards...

    Yours,

    IceKing02

    PS: I drink Stella Artois in a can. You'll find those in a 10-pack at Carrs...

  11. #11

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    I prefer my displacement hulled 6 knot boat over anything faster. It stays in the water year round, and is a fuel miser. Most of the nice folks on this board have planing hulled trailer boats, so they will mostly be of a different opinion. All boats are a compromise...Go with what you will use the most. Personally, having a stout sea-worthy economical vessel is what is most important to me.

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    Member coho slayer's Avatar
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    Exactly. There's no "right answer" to this one. Just depends on what you want, what you're planning on doing with the boat primarily, etc. There is a lot to be said for the comfort of my dad's Nordic Tug, and he keeps it in the water year-round down in WA now. I would still rather have a faster boat for longer runs on short weekends, but if I was retired and spent the whole summer on the boat I'd probably sing a different tune.

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    Member NewMoon's Avatar
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    We have the time (retired) but we don't live near the water (Utah), so trailerable is what works for us. Would love to cruise a Nordic Tug, but like being able to keep the boat here at home, clean and dry. Also like being able to cruise from a variety of launch points (Lake Powell, for instance).

    The compromise that works for us is a 26-foot Bounty that can cruise at 18 knots, but since it's diesel powered gets terrific fuel ecomony at slow speeds (close to 5 nmpg). Much like a Sea Sport but nicer interior design and execution. All the equipment a cruiser needs - even a watermaker. Comfortable for two adults, workable for three, for 2-3 months and 2000-3000 nautical miles per summer in SE AK.

    If I were starting over, I'd consider a Ranger.
    Richard Cook
    New Moon (Bounty 257)
    "Cruising in a Big Way"

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    Member jrogers's Avatar
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    You guys are forgetting door number 3! There is another option:

    http://www.evergreenfilms.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=104&I temid=55

    j
    ust combine the best of both worlds, a full size fridge and a 38kt top end speed. This would be my choice, but I am still working on the financial side of the decision.
    2009 Seawolf 31'
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  15. #15

    Smile

    Jrogers,
    I was all about getting that type of boat, but they didn't have in the color I wanted.

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    Member coho slayer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jrogers View Post
    You guys are forgetting door number 3! There is another option:

    http://www.evergreenfilms.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=104&I temid=55

    j
    ust combine the best of both worlds, a full size fridge and a 38kt top end speed. This would be my choice, but I am still working on the financial side of the decision.
    Quote Originally Posted by Myers View Post
    Jrogers,
    I was all about getting that type of boat, but they didn't have in the color I wanted.
    LOL

    I was hoping to buy a similar boat, but I couldn't find one with an aluminum hull.

    (This is a gorgeous "boat", though...I've seen it in Whittier and Seward.)

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    Quote Originally Posted by jrogers View Post
    You guys are forgetting door number 3! There is another option:

    http://www.evergreenfilms.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=104&I temid=55

    j
    ust combine the best of both worlds, a full size fridge and a 38kt top end speed. This would be my choice, but I am still working on the financial side of the decision.
    That looks like the 49ers sister ship from Seward. Nothing like a $4mil boat taking care of comforts at sea! And those MTUs will burn a hole in your wallet with over 100 gph fuel burn. Dream on!

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    I wish I had the time to go out on week long trips, or lived in Kodiak where excellent fishing is close to harbor. But I live in SC, work 40-60hr weeks, and getting a slip in Whittier is a joke. I really don't like being tied down to a single port, and Seward still seems to be the better spot for fishing.

    So I don't have any regrets about a trawler type boat, because it simply isn't suitable for where and how I boat and has never been a consideration.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

  19. #19

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    I will guarantee that is a 100 gph a side.I have a friend running twin 1530hp Cats and he burns 90gph a side so I am sure the 2000hp's are burning more.Can you imagine burning 200gph????????

    Quote Originally Posted by Fish Witch View Post
    That looks like the 49ers sister ship from Seward. Nothing like a $4mil boat taking care of comforts at sea! And those MTUs will burn a hole in your wallet with over 100 gph fuel burn. Dream on!

  20. #20
    Member jrogers's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by elim View Post
    I will guarantee that is a 100 gph a side.I have a friend running twin 1530hp Cats and he burns 90gph a side so I am sure the 2000hp's are burning more.Can you imagine burning 200gph????????
    I was talking to the captain this summer at the fuel dock, and the numbers he have me were a 27kt cruise at 130gph and max speed of 37kts. It stuck in my head, because if I am full of fuel, water, gear and people with some growth on the bottom, I burn 13gph at 27 kts with a 37kt top end, so we really have similar performance. (times 10!)
    2009 Seawolf 31'
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