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Thread: "Road Hunting" on an ATV

  1. #1
    Supporting Member sigabrt's Avatar
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    Default "Road Hunting" on an ATV

    I see a lot of "road/trail" hunting on ATVs. Load it up, hop on, and cruise the trails (or highways) looking for moose or caribou. I've seen folks driving while balancing the high-powered rifle across their knees.

    I don't know about you, but when I'm driving an ATV it's really hard to take your attention off the rocks/sidehills/ruts/roots and spot anything unless it's standing in the trail in front of you.

    I'm wondering about the success rates of this type of hunting. For me the value of an ATV is to get you into the country. Park it and walk away. Once you have an animal down, crank it up and haul it out.
    "Your papers are not in order"

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    Member PPR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sigabrt View Post
    For me the value of an ATV is to get you into the country. Park it and walk away. Once you have an animal down, crank it up and haul it out.
    couldn't agree more

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    Member akiceman25's Avatar
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    Took my first moose this year while cruising back to camp on my atv. While I was successful in putting meat in my freezer the sense of accomplishment in 'hunting' is not there..... Very uneventful story for my first moose.

    I had, previously in this season, made several stalks on bulls that were close to legal but I needed a closer look. In one instance I got within 30 ft of two of these incredible animals at the same time, a stalk that started with a mile between us. Now THAT felt like I had accomplished something! THAT felt good inside. THAT was hunting!

    I looked forward to posting a thread on my very first moose kill on this forum. But I cannot... I don't have a story....

    -akiceman25

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    Member Casper50's Avatar
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    Road hunters use many means of transport. I hunt a popular river almost every year. Some of the hunters just float down the river, never getting out of the raft except to camp. My pardner and I both got a bull this year. Took some walking but only took two days of hunting. We had to float out longer than that.

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    Member akgun&ammo's Avatar
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    Sometimes circumstances force you to take an easier route. I got my moose this year hunting out of a highway vehicle. Not the way I would really want to do it all the time. It was legal, and due to numerous reasons the only doable way this year. But I do hate seeing those hunters riding the 4 wheelers with a rifle in one hand, on paved road, doing about 25 miles an hour.... Looks like an accicdent just begging to happen.

    Chris

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    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    I very much agree with the comment made by akiceman-

    I've taken animals from very near roads or trails- kind of a chance encounter if you will. But when I'm hunting to fill the freezer I'm not usually picky. My first bou this year was shot just a few hundred yards off the road and while I'm grateful for the meat, it didn't come with a feeling of accomplishment. My second one was shot after a hike in, an hour of glassing and a long stalk on foot led by my son that culminated in our first big game harvest together- it felt just great.

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    Member blasterak's Avatar
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    I can agree to that, I always see people just riding around and never getting off the wheeler to hunt. With that said, one time I did get a moose right off a atv trail(way back in the woods but well used trail), I wasn't even looking for one. It was one of the last days of our hunt, I was pretty down on luck after seeing no bulls in the area at all for over a week. We were headed back to camp and I just happen to catch a glimpse of white, in the corner of my eyes, in the trees 10 yards out as I was cruising along. It was a good size bull and a cow he was hanging with. Just happened to get lucky when my luck was not looking good.

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    I too like to use it as a means of transport, park it, shut it off, then go hunt. If I've been hunting for a few days, the weather gets hot and I may go for a little tookie in the afternoon to get a look at some new country. But, I have a friend who has health problems, bone structure issues, etc. He parks his motorhome and "road hunts" off his ORV each day. He gets moose. It's really the only way he can hunt now days. I went with him one time and did things "his way". We motored in, shut the quads off, he immediately started calling (next to his quad on the trail) and 15 mins later I killed bull coming in to his call. That was cool. Each to his own but I don't care to atv road hunt.

  9. #9
    Member Steve_O's Avatar
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    If a person doesn't have time to do "his homework" during the off season then riding the trails on an ATV is a very viable option. I can cover 10 times as much country on my ATV than I can on foot. I am a meat hunter and always will be. If given a chance to hunt for a trophy or if one is dumb enough to be near a trail then lucky me. I have seen several bulls, bucks etc from ATV and have gotten lucky a few times right from the trail. I had a buddy in MT that wanted to hunt big game with a bow so I took him for a drive in the mountains. He shot a nice 5X4 mulie for his first bow kill. I probably spoiled him into thinking that nice sized animals just live by the major roads. My avatar pic was shot 30 yards off a gravel road. I don't have a problem with road hunting when done safely.
    Steve

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    no no no Steve_O..... we all know ATV/ORV trails scare away the moose... you must be mistaken....

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    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    Depending on a persons circumstances and what the animals are doing a road hunt may be prudent. While discovering game near a road or trail might not be the hunt of a lifetime, it may fill a freezer faster with less recovery time.

    I was up near Sourdough last year when I ran into a trooper that was amazed that we hadn't knocked a bou down. He asked if we were trophy hunting on a subsistence tag. It is all about your goals.
    I don't mean to sound bitter, cold, or cruel, but I am, so that's how it comes out.
    Bill Hicks

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    Member akshootnscoot's Avatar
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    If you have a very rutted up trail, your machine will actually sound like grunting from a ways out. Plastic fenders? run them across some willows for a scraping sound. I had two separate moose run out to challenge me while on a machine last year. Had to hop off and wave my arms to get one of them to stop. I gave the other a wide berth, but he was persistent

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    Member cdubbin's Avatar
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    Moose love atv trails, in this neck of the woods at least. Apparently they hate crawling over beetlekill as much as we do. We got a 56" day before Labor Day; 9 miles from the trailhead, but he was quartered and hangin' in the garage by 5 pm, thanks to those wheelers.
    " Gas boats are bad enough, autos are an invention of the devil, and airplanes are worse." ~Allen Hasselborg

  14. #14
    Member mmusashi2k's Avatar
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    I like to park it and go hunting, but if I saw one on the way in I would have no problem with making life easier for myself. I don't know about moose but I have watched bou scatter as atv's approched and the drivers were clueless. Once, as I was about to shoot a bou a group motored up and spooked them, then after I got their attention and pointed out my plan to take a longer shot at the skittish bull, just as I got rested and was about to fire they started em up again and the bou ran off even further. What part of a guy aiming a gun at caribou didn't they understand? I caught up to the bou again, shot one and dressed it out, then began my hike back to camp to get my 4 wheeler and passed the guys all sitting on a ridge on their atv's glassing a nearby saddle. My buddy, who also left his wheeler at camp came in to get his machine to pack his bull out too. I don't think they appreciated me kicking rocks and talking real loud as I walked by them but I wasn't too crazy about them turning my harvest into a mile long stalk/run. It's really not that hard to hunt on foot, then go get your wheeler to load the meat on. I feel that it is also more courteous to folks in the area as well.

    We couldn't get the wheelers to the one's we got this year so I'm glad we had pack frames along.
    2011 Bou.jpg

    This year we arrived 2 days before season opened and the wheelers were used to support a tarp canopy. They weren't started again until we had bou down.
    If anything is going to happen, it'll happen out there.

  15. #15
    Member highestview's Avatar
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    We hunt in a swampy, tall alder area with lots various knobby red high points and ridges. We spot and move, spot and move. It's an effective way to hunt in the thick brush like that (also, we hunt early in the season, so calling isn't super effective). Sometimes, you wouldn't be able to see the 4 moose behind ridge 'B' from the top of ridge 'A' and it would take at least an hour to walk between the two. A 10 minute ride and BOOM, legal moose right behind the ridge 'B'. It works good in an area like ours where the animals aren't spooked by vehicle noise. At least 5 times (including our kill), we blazed in on assault mode (loud, fast, crushing brush), and they would just stare at us. Sometimes, it makes them stand up, too.

    The other really effective thing about an ATV is getting WAY out there, where you have space to yourself. We don't even set up base camp until we're miles from the highway. Then, we hunt further out from base camp. It's the way to go, in my opinion.
    Born in Alaska: The boundary lines have fallen for me in pleasant places; surely I have a delightful inheritance. Psalm 16:6

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    Quote Originally Posted by dirtofak View Post
    Depending on a persons circumstances and what the animals are doing a road hunt may be prudent. While discovering game near a road or trail might not be the hunt of a lifetime, it may fill a freezer faster with less recovery time.

    I was up near Sourdough last year when I ran into a trooper that was amazed that we hadn't knocked a bou down. He asked if we were trophy hunting on a subsistence tag. It is all about your goals.
    My thought exactly.

  17. #17
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Stupid how many days I have been hiking for hours starting in the early morning only to run up on 2 or 3 moose during a fast ride back to the truck to head home.

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