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Thread: OPPOSE Proposed Dam in Kenai Watershed

  1. #1

    Default OPPOSE Proposed Dam in Kenai Watershed

    For the past few years Homer Electric Association (HEA) has been proposing to build a new hydropower dam on Grant Lake near Moose Pass/Seward in the headwaters of the Kenai River . It has received free money from Alaska Energy Authority (AEA) (http://www.aidea.org/aea/RE_Fund-V.html) to prepare the license application as required by the Federal Power Act. The license application is still in progress, but now HEA has requested several millions of free money from AEA for construction.

    The Kenai River Comprehensive Management Plan recommends:
    The construction of new dams or diversions on the Kenai River or its fish bearing tributaries, which block fish movements, or reduce essential stream flows for spawning, rearing, or migration, will be prohibited. Additional impoundment structures are not considered appropriate because of their fundamental, usually irreversible affect upon the river's hydrology. (http://dnr.alaska.gov/parks/plans/krsmapln/krsmamp3.pdf p.82) There are only a couple of large impoundment structures along the Kenai River, the major one being being the Cooper Landing Hydroelectric project.

    Opposition to this project is essential, specifically opposition to the State of Alaska providing any additional grant funds. Why would the State fund a dam on the Kenai when it has recommended no new dams or diversions? It doesn't make any sense.

    Read: http://homertribune.com/category/opinion/point-of-view/
    http://homernews.com/stories/090711/...l#.TmkzkY6xHIU)

    Anyone who fishes the Kenai should be protesting any additional industrialization of the watershed. The river has already suffered enough nicks and scrapes to last its life time.

    For more information visit Resurrection Bay Conservation Alliance ( http://www.rbca-alaska.org/index.html http://www.rbca-alaska.org/assets/FI...TER TO HEA.pdf)

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by bobber View Post

    Anyone who fishes the Kenai should be protesting any additional industrialization of the watershed. The river has already suffered enough nicks and scrapes to last its life time.
    The cleanest & safest form of renewable energy, we don't want any of that. I got an idea, why don't we drill a lot of holes in the earth "IN" Cook Inlet, I am sure that is safer for the fish. Or maybe have a special tax of O'say maybe $300.-- per year on anyone who fishes the Kenai River, and give that money to Homer Electric too buy power from Chugach Electric, who will buy natural gas from Enstar, who will develop a Coal field on the west side. More Humans=More power needed. Maybe a Pandemic..........

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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AGL4now View Post
    Maybe a Pandemic..........
    Now you're talking about the real solution to the problem.
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    Quote Originally Posted by iofthetaiga View Post
    Now you're talking about the real solution to the problem.
    You first then


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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jkb View Post
    You first then


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    I'm ok with that. May I cough on you before I go?
    ...he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods & errors. ~Thomas Jefferson
    I would rather have a mind opened by wonder than one closed by belief. ~Gerry Spence
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    Quote Originally Posted by iofthetaiga View Post
    I'm ok with that. May I cough on you before I go?
    Why sure we will take one for the Kenai


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  7. #7

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    If you really, Really, REALLY Loved the Kenai River..........do this: First. No Boats with motors anywhere in the Kenai River watershed. Also: You can only fish the river if you you are a Alaskan Resident. Now if that does not help, and you still are worried, then we can go to a drawing for a permit to fish for 4 hours only once every six years. See no matter how you look at it humans are the problem.

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    Member tccak71's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AGL4now View Post
    The cleanest & safest form of renewable energy, we don't want any of that. I got an idea, why don't we drill a lot of holes in the earth "IN" Cook Inlet, I am sure that is safer for the fish. Or maybe have a special tax of O'say maybe $300.-- per year on anyone who fishes the Kenai River, and give that money to Homer Electric too buy power from Chugach Electric, who will buy natural gas from Enstar, who will develop a Coal field on the west side. More Humans=More power needed. Maybe a Pandemic..........
    Great comments AGL.

    Therein lies the problem. Nobody wants any development anywhere to produce energy. Chuitna, Wishbone, Kenai. People need power. Thought renewable was the en vogue energy idea of the next century?

    Headwaters of the Kenai? Its not IN or ON the Kenai. Its east of the Seward Highway and if I remember a small stream connects it to the Kenai. Where would be a great place for a dam for Homer then?

    "Drill, baby drill."

    Tim

  9. #9

    Default "En Vogue" Really?

    It's on a fish-bearing tributary of the Kenai.

    Also, you have your century wrong . . . dams are so last century.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by bobber View Post
    It's on a fish-bearing tributary of the Kenai.

    Also, you have your century wrong . . . dams are so last century.
    So is it the fish that you are worried about................Stop fishing.

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    Member logman 49's Avatar
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    My understanding is that the proposed dam is above a waterfall that stops all fish.

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    Member c6 batmobile's Avatar
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    Ill stir the pot a bit. Im all for renewable energy, but what is the cost here? We have already heard the reports of "troubled" runs. What is going to be the environmental impact of this ****? Has anyone looked into that or considered it?
    Makin fur fins and feathers fly.

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    Grant lake does dont support any salmon runs, in fact there is great skeptisim in ADFG that it even supports any significant fish population.
    My sis-in-law, a Bio. for ADFG, spent a period of time performing gill net surveys in Grant lake as a study to determine fish populations. At that time they caught no fish.

    If a hydro-dam is to be built on the KP I think that Grant lake makes for a likely and superior option, with very little to no impact on native fish populations.

    There have been efforts, and perhaps still are some in the works to decommission Cooper lake dam and restore the creek to its' former fish supportive habitat. It once supported wild salmon returns as well as a substantial rainbow trout and dolly varden populations; it has been compared to the Russian river in articles. Building a hydro plant on Grant lake may be the bargaining chip to get such a thing done- provide cheap and clean energy while creating an opportunity to restore significant native fish populations in a Kenai river tributary.

    This has the potential to be a Win-Win for the utility consumers, sportsmen and women, the power co. and the Cooper creek watershed.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bobber View Post
    Also, you have your century wrong . . . dams are so last century.
    Ok so what is the energy source for this century? Possible the internal combustion engine? Nuclear? .....
    Normal people believe that if something ain't broke, don't fix it. Engineers believe that if it ain't broke, it doesn't have enough features yet.

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    Member c6 batmobile's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by .338WM View Post
    Grant lake does dont support any salmon runs, in fact there is great skeptisim in ADFG that it even supports any significant fish population.
    My sis-in-law, a Bio. for ADFG, spent a period of time performing gill net surveys in Grant lake as a study to determine fish populations. At that time they caught no fish.

    If a hydro-dam is to be built on the KP I think that Grant lake makes for a likely and superior option, with very little to no impact on native fish populations.

    There have been efforts, and perhaps still are some in the works to decommission Cooper lake dam and restore the creek to its' former fish supportive habitat. It once supported wild salmon returns as well as a substantial rainbow trout and dolly varden populations; it has been compared to the Russian river in articles. Building a hydro plant on Grant lake may be the bargaining chip to get such a thing done- provide cheap and clean energy while creating an opportunity to restore significant native fish populations in a Kenai river tributary.

    This has the potential to be a Win-Win for the utility consumers, sportsmen and women, the power co. and the Cooper creek watershed.
    Thats the information we need to hear. If what you say is true then I would say when does construction begin.
    Makin fur fins and feathers fly.

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    Quote Originally Posted by c6 batmobile View Post
    Thats the information we need to hear. If what you say is true then I would say when does construction begin.
    I don't know much about the location of Grant lake and where the spill water would end up, but dams do have a negative effect downstream. Even if there are no salmon in Grant lake or the outlets being ****ed. Warmer water from the reservoir entering the Kenai can have a negative impact on fish. Ask any fisherman who came from the PNW how they feel about new dams.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hayduke View Post
    I don't know much about the location of Grant lake and where the spill water would end up, but dams do have a negative effect downstream. Even if there are no salmon in Grant lake or the outlets being ****ed. Warmer water from the reservoir entering the Kenai can have a negative impact on fish. Ask any fisherman who came from the PNW how they feel about new dams.
    Grant lake is a sizable lake which sits above (east of) Lower Trail lake and is supplied by melting glaciers above it, it is very, very cold, draining into Lower Trail lake then into Kenai lake.

    The Cooper lake dam spill water comes off the bottom of the lake then enters into the creek, this is why it does not support fish - the water is too cold.



    I am certain that water temps are a concern that will scruitinized by the parties involved, particularly if Cooper lake dam enters into the process, frankly, I cannot imagine that Cooper lake would be overlooked in the discussion.

    I am looking forward to hearing more on this project, if this can be of such benefit as to turn Cooper creek around to it's former glory as a fish producing system without harming the Trail lake/river system, I am all for it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by .338WM View Post
    Grant lake is a sizable lake which sits above (east of) Lower Trail lake and is supplied by melting glaciers above it, it is very, very cold, draining into Lower Trail lake then into Kenai lake.
    Would that then make Lower Trail Lake colder subsequently making Kenai Lake colder affecting the fish? I would be interested to see a study (if it has been done) or have a study done to see if that would be the case. I also would be all for it if water temp affects were negligible. Restoring Cooper Creek would also be seriously beneficial.
    Alaska: We're all here cuz we're not all "there"

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    The Cooper creek thing kind of sounds like a carrot on a stick to me. There should be a movement to restore Cooper Cr without having to build additional dams.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hayduke View Post
    The Cooper creek thing kind of sounds like a carrot on a stick to me. There should be a movement to restore Cooper Cr without having to build additional dams.
    If you lose one source of power, another needs to take its place. I would also like to see Cooper Cr restored, but also realize if that dam is removed as a source of power, that loss of a power source needs to be compensated for in some way.
    Alaska: We're all here cuz we're not all "there"

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