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Thread: NOTICE: To every "established" camp

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    Default NOTICE: To every "established" camp

    My promise:

    I will find you and your trail. I will stop in and say Hi, introduce myself, and attempt to find out where you consider your hunting range to be. I will to the best of my ability not hunt in that area and make every effort to move down the trail or extend it. I recognize and respect the effort, sacrifice, and tradition that goes along with hunting in the same spot for 20+ years. I want the same for my family. I understand that you put the trail in 20 years ago on a three wheeler and it took you 4 days to do it. Sorry that it took me 2 hours to get there. I understand that you have skills like welding that allowed you to build the ultimate back country machine. I bought my rig for $12K and now I'm at your door step. I'll thank you for the information about the area, terrain, additional camps and animal behavior that took you 20 years to learn and 10 minutes to share. I'll have a beer with you, offer to help you with anything, even on my way out haul trash for you. In return I ask only these things.


    Do not baloney sugar me that the trail ends at your camp because you decided to camp over the middle of the trail. Do not attempt to put up a NO Trespassing sign. I've already researched the area and know who has mining leases, private property, and native allotments, etc. Do not jokingly threaten me with burning my tent or gear. Do not even insinuate that I have no right to be in the area or that they are "your" moose.

    To every established camp - The sideXside nation is coming. We are internet, map, satellite, and forum savy. We are young and willing to put in the next 20 miles of trail. So, relax, say Hi, and be nice. Or my other promise is that I will post on the internet a bread crumb trail to your camp and hunting area that even a blind person can follow.

  2. #2
    Member tyrex13's Avatar
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    I'm looking for a new moose area, can you tell me where this camp is? It sounds pretty nice!

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    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
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    You sound like such a nice young man...can't wait to meet you.
    BK

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    Ain't that the truth! Very well said my friend.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by tyrex13 View Post
    I'm looking for a new moose area, can you tell me where this camp is? It sounds pretty nice!
    MOOSE Hell, a trail to a not very ugly woman, who really is a outdoors lady.

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Funny that you mention this. We have used the Internet leverage to quell a land owner when he gave us a hard time about skirting his property to access public land behind it. His estimate regarding his property line was quite a bit off of where it truly existed and on the plat there was clearly room between him and the neighbors property regardless of where he put up no trespassing signs. We simply told him that if he left us alone we would move on through but if he pushed it we would call the troopers since posting public land is against the law. Once they came out we would cut a 4' wide trail, pack it down then post a photo journal online if our hunt with a detailed gps route around his land. He was red in the face over it but in the end only asked that we didn't make an obvious trail from the road.

    Do your homework and make sure you are in the right then be civil if/when confronted.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 1S1K View Post
    My promise:

    I will find you and your trail. I will stop in and say Hi, introduce myself, and attempt to find out where you consider your hunting range to be. I will to the best of my ability not hunt in that area and make every effort to move down the trail or extend it. I recognize and respect the effort, sacrifice, and tradition that goes along with hunting in the same spot for 20+ years. I want the same for my family. I understand that you put the trail in 20 years ago on a three wheeler and it took you 4 days to do it. Sorry that it took me 2 hours to get there. I understand that you have skills like welding that allowed you to build the ultimate back country machine. I bought my rig for $12K and now I'm at your door step. I'll thank you for the information about the area, terrain, additional camps and animal behavior that took you 20 years to learn and 10 minutes to share. I'll have a beer with you, offer to help you with anything, even on my way out haul trash for you. In return I ask only these things.


    Do not baloney sugar me that the trail ends at your camp because you decided to camp over the middle of the trail. Do not attempt to put up a NO Trespassing sign. I've already researched the area and know who has mining leases, private property, and native allotments, etc. Do not jokingly threaten me with burning my tent or gear. Do not even insinuate that I have no right to be in the area or that they are "your" moose.

    To every established camp - The sideXside nation is coming. We are internet, map, satellite, and forum savy. We are young and willing to put in the next 20 miles of trail. So, relax, say Hi, and be nice. Or my other promise is that I will post on the internet a bread crumb trail to your camp and hunting area that even a blind person can follow.


    BallZ- I'll give you that

  8. #8
    Member highestview's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1S1K View Post
    To every established camp - The sideXside nation is coming. We are internet, map, satellite, and forum savy. We are young and willing to put in the next 20 miles of trail. So, relax, say Hi, and be nice. Or my other promise is that I will post on the internet a bread crumb trail to your camp and hunting area that even a blind person can follow.

    This is why I always go in the first day (or before) of the season and set my tent up high. That, combined with hunting a miserably swampy area, tends to weed out the day-trippers. Watched 4 guys who were barely making it on through the mud on their expensive wheelers see our camp and stop, curse loud enough to be heard from 1/2 mile away, turn around and leave. It was pretty funny. Plenty of swamp for everyone, but they got all huffy and left.

    After taking out moose, we saw two other guys on the trail on the way out (one who was a friend of my boss, had to be polite). We stopped, shot the breeze, told them what we had got, what else we had seen, where we had seen it and wished them good luck. We got to the trail head and started unpacking for 20 minutes when they showed up again. Apparently 1/2 hour on that trail was enough for them, even on their $10,000 Arctic Cat's.

    Be nice to whoever you meet, don't get all 'turf'y. If they're expert hunters, you'll probably get some good info from them. If they're tardbuckets, they'll hopefully leave you alone. Sometimes that's the best you can hope for.

    If you're going to stake some claim, you better use an electric fence or Viet-Cong style traps.
    Born in Alaska: The boundary lines have fallen for me in pleasant places; surely I have a delightful inheritance. Psalm 16:6

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    Quote Originally Posted by highestview View Post
    If you're going to stake some claim, you better use an electric fence or Viet-Cong style traps.
    Great, now I'll be looking for trip wires as well as animals

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    I had almost the exact opposite experience this weekend...or should I say the ideal experience as explained in the first part of the original post. My wife and I rode into a valley that I hadn't visited since the late 90s. Back then it was little more than a widened-out horse trail, but now it is a fairly established ATV route. We ran into a guy at the trailhead that was heading in alone, so I asked where he planned to camp and hunt so that we weren't stepping on his toes. He proceeded to give us tips about the river crossing, where he had seen animals the year prior, and where we might focus our efforts based upon his yearly forays into the area over the past decade plus. What a refreshing experience that was, and when he stopped into our camp to chat the next evening we were glad to see him again. We talked some more that night and decided to change our plans for the following day because he was heading into the area we had planned to hunt in order to chase a grizzly he had spotted the prior weekend. We weren't bothered at all to change our plans, rather we were glad to do so since he was so helpful and forthright with his information. The man had hunted there for a long time and certainly had more invested in the area, but he understood the value of working together and in return we treated his help with the respect it deserved.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    I had almost the exact opposite experience this weekend...or should I say the ideal experience as explained in the first part of the original post. My wife and I rode into a valley that I hadn't visited since the late 90s. Back then it was little more than a widened-out horse trail, but now it is a fairly established ATV route. We ran into a guy at the trailhead that was heading in alone, so I asked where he planned to camp and hunt so that we weren't stepping on his toes. He proceeded to give us tips about the river crossing, where he had seen animals the year prior, and where we might focus our efforts based upon his yearly forays into the area over the past decade plus. What a refreshing experience that was, and when he stopped into our camp to chat the next evening we were glad to see him again. We talked some more that night and decided to change our plans for the following day because he was heading into the area we had planned to hunt in order to chase a grizzly he had spotted the prior weekend. We weren't bothered at all to change our plans, rather we were glad to do so since he was so helpful and forthright with his information. The man had hunted there for a long time and certainly had more invested in the area, but he understood the value of working together and in return we treated his help with the respect it deserved.
    I totally agree... and my experiences have been more positive. Talked to some others, they were camped out and planning to hunt an area beyond that location ... we stopped and hunted a different section. had some others pass through. They asked so we told them our plans ... and they kept on going. Didn't hurt that I helped get them unstuck earlier in the day.

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    19 time in 20 my experience is the same as yours Brian. I am out to have fun and generally do but enough time wondering around and you will find some that take steps to dissuade others from doing what they are legally and IMHO ethically allowed to do. I don't want to hunt on top of someone but if a guy thinks that pitching a tent 2 or more years in a row gives him private rights to hundreds (or thousands) of acres of public lands well that is a different story. I may have a "spot" in mind when I head out but if you are there then you are not in "my spot" you are in "your spot" and I will probably stop in and say hi then move on.

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    Member highestview's Avatar
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    It's illegal to post 'No Trespassing' signs on public land, but maybe some 'HAZMAT' signs would do. 4 days of trail food and no shower approches legitimate HAZMAT, in my case.
    Born in Alaska: The boundary lines have fallen for me in pleasant places; surely I have a delightful inheritance. Psalm 16:6

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    Mean while back east someone is saying why don't he write..
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

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    Member hooternanny's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    ... if a guy thinks that pitching a tent 2 or more years in a row gives him private rights to hundreds (or thousands) of acres of public lands well that is a different story....
    i know of an example where a guy pitched a tent in the middle of an airstrip, and scatter gear to try and keep one from landing in an area of all public land.

    i think that private land owners going beyond their own boundries is very common, which in someways shows good stewardship from those land owners of nearby public lands, but the fact is they either own it or they don't.

    but the tent pitcher ( as in the example above ) visibly had another bigger tent you could see his camp from the air, and imo- he just put a spike tent on the airstrip and scattered some junk out there the make landing difficult and dangerous if not impossible.-and he didn't own anything as it was all private land- like the example you mention.

    somebody who actually owns land atleast nearby is more likely to recieve impathy from myself, and my experience has been the same as your and brian mentioned if they are decent people.

    the tent pitcher i refer to ended up getting mad after the other hunters entered "his hunting area" (ya right). then after one of the other hunters took a moose, the tent pitched called for his plane. after his plane arrived and he left, fish and game showed up because somebody reported that a hunter had illegaly harvested a moose. a sub legal moose. the leo saw the legal moose and everything was good only after he gave up looking for the sub legal.

    in the end no citations were issued. the successful hunter did everything legal and in some ways got harassed by the leo, but not really the leo was just doing his job. the guy who should have been charged for interfering with someones legal right to hunt should have been charged and was not.

    the OP's "i will post every bread crumb trail to the door of the spot" is not the answer, imho. coming home and typing it out about how you got hosed!

    just like the one who tried to block the airstrip lost out in the end of my story, if you are humble and diligent and stay within your rights and responsibilities- you should be good to do whatcha came for!
    edit signature here

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    The tent pitcher in your story should have been charged with making a false statement to police and fined the cost of the LEO's time and travel. I too feel a certain empathy to land owners. My buddy who legitimately does own 40 acres has a trail bisecting his property that he built for his personal use. It is 100% on private land to the back of his 40 and will likely one day be his driveway. He is constantly dealing with people parking on his property and taking quads through it. Add to that his neighbor runs a cabin business and seems to feel that his customers should have the right to wonder on his private property at will. I am not and would not advocate trespassing on marked property but you ONLY own YOUR property. In the case I mentioned earlier there is a huge amount of public land beyond the property owners land and there is public property between him and the neighbor. He is fully aware of those facts but feels that he somehow purchased rights to an entire drainage by buying land at the mouth of it. This land has been hunted by me and a my family since the late 80's and by my friend since the late 70's. It is frustrating getting hassled by a guy like that!

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    Member Chisana's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    I had almost the exact opposite experience this weekend...or should I say the ideal experience as explained in the first part of the original post. My wife and I rode into a valley that I hadn't visited since the late 90s. Back then it was little more than a widened-out horse trail, but now it is a fairly established ATV route. We ran into a guy at the trailhead that was heading in alone, so I asked where he planned to camp and hunt so that we weren't stepping on his toes. He proceeded to give us tips about the river crossing, where he had seen animals the year prior, and where we might focus our efforts based upon his yearly forays into the area over the past decade plus. What a refreshing experience that was, and when he stopped into our camp to chat the next evening we were glad to see him again. We talked some more that night and decided to change our plans for the following day because he was heading into the area we had planned to hunt in order to chase a grizzly he had spotted the prior weekend. We weren't bothered at all to change our plans, rather we were glad to do so since he was so helpful and forthright with his information. The man had hunted there for a long time and certainly had more invested in the area, but he understood the value of working together and in return we treated his help with the respect it deserved.
    Outstanding Brian. Thanks for sharing this.

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    A couple more stories for this year... I was hunting and saw a caribou. Another ATV arrived and they saw it also. They ATV'd to my location, we talked.

    They asked if I was going to go after the bull. At that point, the bull had gone over the hill away from us, was out of range, so I said no. I asked them if they were and they said no. After several minutes of glassing the area together the bull and his caribou buddies circled the end of a lake and were coming closer to us. After conversing with the other ATV riders, they weren't interested in pursuing it as they were looking for something bigger...so off I went.

    The ATV'rs were very courteous and watched my stalk from the trail. They left after I had fired some shots.

    Or this past weekend. Saw a bull moose. The group of ATV's saw us get our rifles, stopped their progress and watched. The moose went off into the trees, so we got back in the ATV and continued down the trail. We stopped and let the other ATV's pass. They went up the trail a ways, pulled over and were glassing. We waited until they continued down the trail ... yep, they were glassing the moose we had seen.

    Sure, we had seen the moose first ... if they came along and shot it, I would have been a little unhappy. But they showed some respect when they saw us looking at the moose and didn't continue up to us or past us until we stopped our efforts. Not saying the same etiquette would work off a busy Hwy or the start of a major ATV trail, or that people are going to be content to wait for a prolonged time for one to make a go at a critter before taking it themselves ... but the comraderie was satisfying to see and we were more than happy to repay the same level of respect/courtesy.

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    I had a unique situation I ran across last week. I drove up into unit 20B from the Valley (a combination of work and hunting). I had a spot I planned to go into and hunt. This spot held only a couple of clearings, and can’t support more than a couple hunters total. There is an ATV trail in from the highway which has several dead-end branches off of it. When my partner and I arrived at the spot, we found a handmade sign in the branch I wanted to go into, placed on the edge of the trail, not in the middle. This was about the spot I planned to park the wheeler and walk from.

    The sign said “My daughter and I have a moose camp nearby. This is a dead-end trail. If you continue you the only thing you will accomplish is to mess up our hunt.” (Or at least it was words close to that.) At the bottom of the sign was both father and daughters name and phone number. They did not attempt to block the trail, just posted notice that they had a camp ahead.

    This is the second time in about the last 4 years I have seen something similar. The last time was a simple sign saying “Moose Camp Ahead”, again on what I knew to be a dead-end trail, this time in the Willow area.

    In both cases I respected the persons camp, and shifted my hunt to other locations. I was just as happy to know ahead of time that someone else was in there hunting instead of walking in and interrupting their hunt. I know this was public land, they had no right to post it, blah, blah. But to me it seemed the right thing to do.

    Of course, I hope I don't start seeing people making a habit of this and putting up signs everywhere just to keep people out. Both of these locations appeared to be being actively hunted.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by acadinak View Post
    The sign said “My daughter and I have a moose camp nearby. This is a dead-end trail. If you continue you the only thing you will accomplish is to mess up our hunt.” (Or at least it was words close to that.) At the bottom of the sign was both father and daughters name and phone number. They did not attempt to block the trail, just posted notice that they had a camp ahead..... I know this was public land, they had no right to post it, blah, blah. But to me it seemed the right thing to do.
    This isn't posting... posting would be a sign saying "No Trespassing" or "No Entry" or the like. A sign informing a trail user that a moose camp is ahead and asking for manners isn't attempting to restrict the other user in any way other than voluntarily.

    I don't particularly find it offensive but I can see where some folks would abuse it as a strategy.

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