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Thread: Hunting Weather

  1. #1
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Default Hunting Weather

    It seems that there have been a large number of hunts spoiled by bad weather this season. I know in this fast moving world we live in, with limited time off and hunts both paid and planned for sometimes years in advance, many give little consideration to the weather and are determined to go on matter what.

    Only to be miserable suffering through dangerous weather and unhuntable conditions and just want to be back home no matter the cost. I'm not talking about an evening rain storm. Big weather, like slow moving low pressure systems, fogged in condition, snow storms, icing, extreme winds ect...



    After a few of these, I now watch the weather just as I would if I were boating in big water or filing a flight plan.

    It is sometimes the wiser choice to know when to foldem so to speak. Having a plan B might be something to consider. I realize this is not possible for all, but could be a good way to still enjoy a trip even if it wasnít exactly what you had in mind.

    Much better than being stuck in a tent praying that it donít get blown away.

    Thoughts???

    Steve
    "I refuse to let the things I can't do stop me from doing the things I can"
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  2. #2
    Member muskeg's Avatar
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    It's been weather in S Eastern ... spelled with a capitol W.

  3. #3
    Member Alaskan22's Avatar
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    Steve, I'm with you on this. A few years back I thought I could "push through" a little winter storm to get out to the trapline. I was wrong...and almost deadly so. I now watch the weather, and will pass if it isn't appropriate.

    I agree that most will try to "get out there" and hope it clears up and be there when it does. Lots of money in gear, planning, and traveling already tied up, so they go for it. Only to WISH, at any cost, that they weren't out there. Been there, done that.

    In fact, I'll patiently wait in Kodiak to see what the weather brings when I am down there. "Marginal" weather will put me in the hills. "Crappy" weather will put me at the brewery.
    Know guns. Know peace. Know safety.

    No guns: no peace. No safety!

  4. #4
    Moderator kingfisherktn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by muskeg View Post
    It's been weather in S Eastern ... spelled with a capitol W.
    My boys flew into a goat lake on Thursday, supposed to be coming out this afternoon.......we'll see if that happens.

  5. #5
    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    I'm probably a bit more cautious than required when it comes to weather..but erring on the side of caution ensures a long life.

    That's one of the reason I prefer hunting locally in places I can walk out of if it comes right down to bugging out in a bad one. I know in the Interior this year the weather so far has been an endless string of slow moving low pressure with rain, fog and snow at elevation.

    Been stranded due to climate conditions enough times I don't want to do it anymore.

  6. #6
    Member bushrat's Avatar
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    While weather forecasting isn't 100% accurate, it is a highly advanced field these days that is pretty accurate most times. I posted a thread a week or so ago saying that we had become an official NOAA weather site like many other "COOP" sites across the state. We send in daily lows, highs, precipitation, and also river depth data. So for boaters/rafters, for example, that is a great tool to use prior to a hunt to see what kind of temps and river conditions you may expect.

    For the mtn stuff, you can look at forecasts prior to flying in for a goat or sheep hunt for an estimation of what you may expect. You can get pretty accurate forecasts three days out. Then look at the longer term forecasts. Say you're going on a goat hunt, you check the forecast the night before you fly out and it says a big storm is expected in three days...your chance to back out or go, to decide if losing a deposit on an air-taxi and a once-in-a-lifetime tag and opportunity is worth what may happen on the mtn in a few days.

    So like Steve says, watch the weather, read the forecasts before going afield, make as informed decisions as you can.

  7. #7
    Member fullkurl's Avatar
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    Great topic and info posted here.

    As anxious hunters we're always tough guys when we're in our living room endlessly packing and repacking our gear in anticipation of that big ram or billy hunt.
    When that slow moving, low-pressure monster does come, that excitement can go right out the window and concern sets in when our equipment is tested to the max at 80 knots.

    Studying the forecast, survival gear and frank discussion about bad weather with the hunting buds before the hunt is a good plan. That way there are few surprises.
    Plan for the worst, if the good stuff comes, enjoy it.
    Proud to be an American!

  8. #8

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    Try being in a small tent with a guy who spent $12,500.00 plus tags, lic. air fare, etc. for his dream hunt. He hs been in the tent with you for 4 1/2 days riding out 60MPH to 80MPH wind, with buckets of rain during day, and wet snow at night. And for the 22,thousands time he asks, "when do you think this will end"???
    You know more about his private thoughts than his wife. (For Bonus points, same situation, but you are with a assistant guide who is crying because he helped kill some people two weeks ago).

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by bushrat View Post
    I posted a thread a week or so ago saying that we had become an official NOAA weather site like many other "COOP" sites across the state. We send in daily lows, highs, precipitation, and also river depth data.
    So like Steve says, watch the weather, read the forecasts before going afield, make as informed decisions as you can.
    How do we access this information BR?

    Here is a link to great weather tracking website. Save this to your favorites guys!

    Akweathercams

  10. #10
    Member Hayduke's Avatar
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    Had to turn around yesterday during my DC001 hunt. Day two of a five day hunt. My wife and I's rain gear had completely failed and we were already soaked. Plus I could see it was snowing and blowing hard at our intended destination. It sucked to pull the plug so close but I am glad we did.

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by tailwind View Post
    How do we access this information BR?

    Here is a link to great weather tracking website. Save this to your favorites guys!

    Akweathercams
    My default weather: http://www.accuweather.com/us/ak/hop...st-details.asp

    And also: http://www.weather.com/weather/map/U...est=Alaska:AK1

  12. #12
    Member Alaskan22's Avatar
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    My "what's coming up" site (remember, closer the lines = windier):

    http://pafc.arh.noaa.gov/gfemodel/index.php

    I have a lot of sites for local weather stations and blow holes too.
    Know guns. Know peace. Know safety.

    No guns: no peace. No safety!

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaskan22 View Post

    and blow holes too.
    Hehehehehehehe.....................Sorry, I have a demented humor.

  14. #14
    Member Alaskan22's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AGL4now View Post
    Hehehehehehehe.....................Sorry, I have a demented humor.
    When i wrote it I chuckled, but they have a saying here in Nome: "It blows so much it sucks."

    In one of these locations (i.e. Blow holes) I've had my Siglin sled literally spinning behind my snogo like a kite and pulling the rear of the machine with it. It was loaded at the time...and later became known as the "beer spewing sled" as the Iditarod trail was covered with cans of beer that WERE in my sled at one time. They were packaged well, but one of the spins and landings busted a hole and every subsequent spin resulted in a "donation" to the land. I'd have picked them up (did after the Iditarod went through as thats when I came back from the trapline), but I was close to dying at that point and unhitched the siglin and left it all at the shelter cabin with drift wood piled on it. One of the worst experiences of my life, and never want to have frostbite like I did from that trip (half of my face turned to a scab and oozed).
    Know guns. Know peace. Know safety.

    No guns: no peace. No safety!

  15. #15
    Member Alaskan22's Avatar
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    Just got a phone call from my pops on his Crown Mtn hunt. They are out of the hills. Storm was so bad that everything got soaked and collapsed their tent. Weren't due out for a week, but with everything being wet they didn't want to risk trying to dry it all out and hope the rain was done.

    Reminds me of a couple of sayings:
    - "if it was easy, everyone would do it."
    -"gotta have bad hunts, to know when you have a good one."
    Know guns. Know peace. Know safety.

    No guns: no peace. No safety!

  16. #16
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaskan22 View Post
    Just got a phone call from my pops on his Crown Mtn hunt. They are out of the hills. Storm was so bad that everything got soaked and collapsed their tent. Weren't due out for a week, but with everything being wet they didn't want to risk trying to dry it all out and hope the rain was done.

    Reminds me of a couple of sayings:
    - "if it was easy, everyone would do it."
    -"gotta have bad hunts, to know when you have a good one."

    Well said!!! I agree when it stops being fun it is time to go.
    "I refuse to let the things I can't do stop me from doing the things I can"
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  17. #17
    Moderator kingfisherktn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kingfisherktn View Post
    My boys flew into a goat lake on Thursday, supposed to be coming out this afternoon.......we'll see if that happens.
    My boys are still stuck because of the weather and today doesn't look much better for them coming out. I talked to the air carrier yesterday and he flew over them Saturday while it was clear and said they had a good looking camp set up on the lake and did see them on top of the mtn. hunting.

  18. #18
    Member Smokey's Avatar
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    Very good post Steve,
    I think the non res that comes up for that "dream hunt" is really vunerable to weather. Hopefully he/she has a great friend or guide or transporter that will do their best to explain the risks. I have asked a couple outfitters if them or their pilots had the courage to look me in the eye and say "NO, we will not fly in today" - thats the guys I want to go with. Yes it hurts - both mentally and financially - but when one is out of their elements you have to depend on locals to be good shepards - however you have to be savvy enough to also ask good questions.
    When asked what state I live in I say "The State of Confusion", better known as IL....

  19. #19
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Smokey,,

    There are unfortunately crash after crash, several in the last few years. Many of which was from flying into weather. Continued VFR flight into IMC conditions. Knowing your limits is crucial. Live to hunt or fish another day.





    As a pilot myself,, I can say I would much prefer to be on the ground wishing I was flying, than to be flying and wishing I was on the ground.



    Hoping for a safe passage to all.
    "I refuse to let the things I can't do stop me from doing the things I can"
    Founding Member
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  20. #20
    Member Smokey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stid2677 View Post
    Smokey,,

    There are unfortunately crash after crash, several in the last few years. Many of which was from flying into weather. Continued VFR flight into IMC conditions. Knowing your limits is crucial. Live to hunt or fish another day.





    As a pilot myself,, I can say I would much prefer to be on the ground wishing I was flying, than to be flying and wishing I was on the ground.



    Hoping for a safe passage to all.
    Sadly I have lost many friends I have known over 35 years that were pilots in Canada and all were seasoned flyers. I will say almost all of them crashed from "overloading" issues or trying to shortcut a take off - it is very risky for sure.
    When asked what state I live in I say "The State of Confusion", better known as IL....

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