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Thread: Srooms anyone?

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    Member Rick P's Avatar
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    Default Srooms anyone?

    Stopped on our way home form duck hunting to see what we could scare up in the woods. No small game today but boy did we score on the shrooms! 3.5 pounds of hedge hogs, 1.5 of goats beard and just shy of a pound of puff balls! Before fellow gathers go nutz we left more than we picked and the plastic bag was all we had.IMG_3175.jpg
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    That's a good harvest and I have to say I'm not familiar with the hedge hogs or the goats beard. The goats beard looks easy to identify by matching the name to the description. How do you cook the puffballs? I did expand my shroom resume this year by trying some king bolets, and they were excellent. Your post has given me some motivation to go hunt up some shrooms for dinner tonight. I did see some shaggy mains poking through the grass in the lawn this morning.

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    Member Rick P's Avatar
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    Hedge hogs are easy too, they are toothed instead of gilled mushrooms. They are definately one of my favorites, look for them in spruce stands. Alaskas only other toothed mushroom is a belly button and they are even better! Puff balls are good cooked just about any way you'd care to fix them. They have a smoother texture than other mushrooms and are wonderful battered and deep fried. If the inside has a green tinge to them they are too far gone and will be bitter, I always cut mine in half to check. Shaggy manes are a bit soft getem small, but they have a great almost spicey flavor.
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    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    Nice job Rick.
    I love battered and deepfried puffballs. I usually find a few by my mom and dads house this time of year.
    I saw they had a puffball at the state fair that was close to basketball size. Not sure about eating one that big but the smaller ones taste great.
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    Wow!! Those are some great mushrooms!! Could you send some in our direction? CJ is doing a project on mushrooms and needs some samples!!
    Lurker.

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    Default King boletes . .

    This is the time of year to look for king boletes . . damp, cool fall weather. They are the only fall mushroom I look for because they can usually be found in significant enough quantity to make it worthwhile. I slice and dry them before using . . drying and reconstituting intensifies the flavor.

    King boletes are what Europeans call "porcini."

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    Member garnede's Avatar
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    Great haul there rick. Enjoy some fine eating.
    It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

    http://wouldieatitagainfoodblog.blogspot.com/

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    Member Rick P's Avatar
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    Im going to have to try that Marcus!

    Dave! Things got so busy by the time it slows down enough to think about calling its so late I'm afraid to wake the little one.
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    Nice picken!! enjoy I think what you are calling hedge hogs are actually hawks wings...By what the books I have
    say..but hay they are both good eatn..If you every what to talk mushrooms send me a PM... I really enjoy strolling through the woods moose/small game/prospecting and shroom . With either a large or small caliber rifle..

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    Messaged you on FB.
    Thanks for your shroom donation!!
    Lurker.

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    Quote Originally Posted by COtoAK View Post
    Messaged you on FB.
    Thanks for your shroom donation!!
    Hey, where's mine?

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    Quote Originally Posted by kingfisherktn View Post
    Hey, where's mine?
    Hey now. It's for C.J.'s shroom project.
    Lurker.

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    Quote Originally Posted by COtoAK View Post
    Hey now. It's for C.J.'s shroom project.
    If you say so.............

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    I agree with Marcus. With the heavy rains on the Kenai Penninsula, king boletes should be coming up soon. Perhaps it's already fruiting. Get there before the bugs do. Fly larvae are known to infest king boletes within hours of coming up. They are the best mushroom in the woods. Followed closely by the chanterelles........

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    Default King boletes . . .

    Quote Originally Posted by Cohoangler View Post
    I agree with Marcus. With the heavy rains on the Kenai Penninsula, king boletes should be coming up soon. Perhaps it's already fruiting. Get there before the bugs do. Fly larvae are known to infest king boletes within hours of coming up. They are the best mushroom in the woods. Followed closely by the chanterelles........
    Is anyone finding king boletes lately? I found a few a couple weeks ago but none lately. We were out in the Johnson Lake area yesterday where I've found them before, and while there were lots of mushrooms, no kings. Did get a few gemmed puffballs, which went into fried eggs this morning.

    For my money, Coho, the best mushroom is the morel followed by the king boletes. Also, while I've observed that other boletes get buggy real quick, my experience is that king boletes are far less so.

    Finally, we dry all our mushrooms rather than consuming them when fresh. When drying mature kings, I cut off the spore mass and dry only the cap and the stem. We dry the whole morel sliced in half lengthways.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick P View Post
    Stopped on our way home form duck hunting to see what we could scare up in the woods. No small game today but boy did we score on the shrooms! 3.5 pounds of hedge hogs, 1.5 of goats beard and just shy of a pound of puff balls! Before fellow gathers go nutz we left more than we picked and the plastic bag was all we had.IMG_3175.jpg
    Good looking mushrooms, I'm jealous. I think your hedgehogs (hydnum repandum) are actually sarcodon scabrosus. Nothing poisonous but I've read they don't taste great. Let me know how they are? How do you preserve meatier toothed shrooms?

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    Marcus, my wife would agree with you. She thinks morels are the best, followed by king boletes. She ranks chanterelles no higher than about fourth or fifth. My top five include KB's, chanterelles, morels, fresh hedgehogs (bear claw, goats beard, etc), and Agaricus augustus (the Prince). Be careful with that last one. Lots of look-alikes that are poisonus.

    FishCrazy is right. The hedgehogs in the pic appears to be hawk's wing (Sarcodon imbricatus). Not a real good mushroom for the plate. It won't kill ya, but it ain't real tasty either.

    See it here: http://www.mushroomexpert.com/sarcodon_imbricatus.html

    My experience with hedgehog mushrooms is that they are terrific when fresh. But if they're just a little old, they're really bitter.

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    Rick,
    These keep plugging up my mower, let me know if you want any. I'm still chicken.

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    Question

    I'd be interested to know as well . . looks like a bolete to me.

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    Scott - Lemme guess - You have birch trees in your yard. If so, those are birch boletes - Leccinum scabrum. They are a very commom bolote that fruits in the early fall around birch trees. They grow in association with the roots.

    See them here: http://www.mykoweb.com/CAF/species/L...m_scabrum.html

    Regardless, these mushrooms are mature. The spore surface (the pores under the cap) are open and are actively depositing spores. In other words, they're too far gone to be eaten. It's likely they're full of fly larve too. Even when they're fresh, they are not known to be very tasty. The field guides say they're okay to eat. Maybe, but I've never been hungry enough to eat one.

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