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Thread: The Kid can shoot - Moose 2 & 3

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    Default The Kid can shoot - Moose 2 & 3

    My daughter and I took a second trip to try and fill her cow tag and her Moms (Proxy). My hunting partner was along as a pack horse - good thing. We only had a couple days left to fill the tags so my daughter prearranged her absence from school so we could hunt the final 2 days. Early the first morning we found a nice cow feeding in the slough we were hunting. We watched her for a long time looking for a calf and once we determined it was alone she took the shot with her 30-06 at 177 yards on the range finder. The cow was standing on the edge of the shallow slough and when shot she ran all the way across the slough and disappeared into the trees. We proceeded down the slough to find the cow dead from a heart shot about 10 feet from where she entered the trees. She did us the favor of falling about 10 feet from a spruce tree that had fallen and lodged in a birch tree creating a great hanging pole. Perfect place & weather for butchering, mossy, dry, clear skies a couple hours later she was hanging & cooling. The best conditions for butchering you could ask for, still cool out so there wasn't even any bugs.




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    Roll forward 12 hours and a second cow presented herself. We watched the cow for about 20 minutes and determined she was alone and standing at 242 yards away, again in the edge of the slough. We decided that with the nice rest aim she had it was a good shot and she took it. The shot resulted in a similar reaction as to first moose but not quite the same results. Same slough - different spot that was not so shallow and she didn’t make it out the other side. No problem as we are prepared but a little more work, dark setting in, bugs out, and of course it started to rain. Going prepared is a big deal in meat salvaging a canoe to get to the moose, chainsaw winch for removing it from the slough, tarps to butcher under, head lamps and lantern for light. Most important a hunting partner with a strong back willing to work till 2 am to get it done right!

    Couldn’t be more proud of my daughter – in her short career as a big game hunter she has shot 3 times and killed 3 moose – all 3 shots were dead on. Cool, calm, and has passed on a nice moose when she didn’t have a shot she was satisfied with. Made for a long day but worth every second of it, won’t forget it anytime soon!



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    Congrats to your daughter and you!!!

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    Member willphish4food's Avatar
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    nicely done! You've reared her well!

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    Way COOL

    Like woman snipers inthe Soviet army, Alaskan women can shoot
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

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    She will be the envy of all her male classmates
    Well done to her. Looks like some fine eating for the winter.
    Tennessee

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    Congrats on all the success, RR, and to your daughter for the great patience and shooting. Can you tell us a bit more about your butchering process, what tool are you using to make the vertebrae cuts? Do you do bigger bulls that way too with ribs attached to front shoulders? Curious what the advantages are in doing it that way, I wouldn't be able to lift those heavier pieces with backbone and ribs still attached.

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    Member Akgramps's Avatar
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    Very cool, nice job all the way around...............
    “Nothing worth doing is easy”
    TR

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    Member Smokey's Avatar
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    Very well done for sure! I have a 27 yr old son that needs a gal like that so I can have some more grandchildren!
    When asked what state I live in I say "The State of Confusion", better known as IL....

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    Barbecue at Raven's!

    Congrats to your daughter and the whole crew.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bushrat View Post
    Congrats on all the success, RR, and to your daughter for the great patience and shooting. Can you tell us a bit more about your butchering process, what tool are you using to make the vertebrae cuts? Do you do bigger bulls that way too with ribs attached to front shoulders? Curious what the advantages are in doing it that way, I wouldn't be able to lift those heavier pieces with backbone and ribs still attached.
    Just a personal preference for butchering on the smaller moose - Can't do it on one much bigger than these were. I prefer leaving everything on the bone as long as possible, less meat exposed means the less chance of it getting dirty or wet. I have a band saw at home so I can make a lot of great bone in cuts. Pretty straight forward butchering process:

    Cut the head off
    Roll moose onto back (requires tying into position)
    Split the hide from the anus all the way though the neck
    Split the pelvis (Hatchet)
    Open gut sack (knife)
    Split chest (wyoming saw)
    Roll out the guts
    Salvage heart & liver
    Cut moose in half at 2nd rib (Wyoming saw)
    Split hide up the back on the 2 pieces
    Stand each piece up and split down the spine (Wyoming saw)
    Hang 4 pieces
    Remove hide
    Clean and wipe down with citric acid
    Bag 4 pieces
    Skin head and bag

    I wouldn't expect to butcher this way if I was by myself or had to pack it very far. It needs to be the right moose in the right spot but if I can I prefer this method. Drooling just thinking about the T-bones we will be eating soon.

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    Member bushrat's Avatar
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    RR, thanks, that's a real neat way to do it, enjoy those steaks, gonna be some real tender meat from the looks of it.

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    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Congratulations to you both Mr RR, she is becoming quite the huntress. Looks like some great eats. Did she get to shoot her new scatter gun yet???

    Well done to all.

    Steve
    "I refuse to let the things I can't do stop me from doing the things I can"
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    Member akjw7's Avatar
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    Really great - congrats!

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    Member IceKing02's Avatar
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    RamblinRaven,

    Your processing looks so darn clean that I'm interested in trying out this methodology. First, however, I have a question about the butchering process that you are using:

    1) Do you cut off the head at the base of the skull not at the base of the neck?
    2) Do you mean to say that you cut the moose in half at the LAST two ribs, between the 11th and 12th, not the 1st and 2nd ribs? (In humans the first rib is closest to the head and the last rib is closest to the pelvis.)
    3) It looks like you are keeping the spine attached to the left half of the ribcage in the pictures. Is this correct?
    4) I understand that you stand the front half of the moose up to make that cut through the ribs. Do you cut the ribs far enough laterally that you keep both of the backstraps on the left half of the moose (with the spine) or do you cut the ribs and the lateral processes of the spine and, as such, keep the backstrap attached to the right half of the rib cage?

    Thanks again for the pictures and story. I can only dream to have such an adventure with my little girl some day. Congratulations!

    Yours,

    IceKing02

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    Quote Originally Posted by IceKing02 View Post
    RamblinRaven,

    Your processing looks so darn clean that I'm interested in trying out this methodology. First, however, I have a question about the butchering process that you are using:

    1) Do you cut off the head at the base of the skull not at the base of the neck?
    2) Do you mean to say that you cut the moose in half at the LAST two ribs, between the 11th and 12th, not the 1st and 2nd ribs? (In humans the first rib is closest to the head and the last rib is closest to the pelvis.)
    3) It looks like you are keeping the spine attached to the left half of the ribcage in the pictures. Is this correct?
    4) I understand that you stand the front half of the moose up to make that cut through the ribs. Do you cut the ribs far enough laterally that you keep both of the backstraps on the left half of the moose (with the spine) or do you cut the ribs and the lateral processes of the spine and, as such, keep the backstrap attached to the right half of the rib cage?

    Thanks again for the pictures and story. I can only dream to have such an adventure with my little girl some day. Congratulations!

    Yours,

    IceKing02
    Hello IceKing02,
    1) The head is cut off at the base of the skull leaving the neck attached to the body.
    2) According to your description it would be the last 2 ribs - (Been a long time since anatomy class for me) If you leave 1 rib attached to the quarters you avoid messing with the tenderloins.
    3) The spine is split in 1/2 down the center leaving an equal amount on each side. Sounds harder that it really is but it does go smoothly with a sharp saw blade and a strong hunting partner. If you have bone marrow left on each side you have achieved perfection.
    4) Again - the spine is cut down the center leaving a back strap on each half. These make for some really good bone in roasts for holiday meals.

    When we start the butchering tomorrow I will get some closer up pictures and post them.

    It really is a blessing being able to hunt with my daughter. I can't wait for school to quit interfering with her hunting so I can take her to the Koyukuk and get her on a nice bull. During the butchering about 1 am in the rain the other day she said "I have a better appreciation for what I will be eating knowing how much work has to go into it."

  17. #17
    Member BIG 27's Avatar
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    Rambling,

    Will be great memories for you both nice pics thanks for sharing.

    Tim
    “A man does not climb a mountain without bringing some of it away with him,and leaving something of himself upon it -- Sir Martin Conway

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    Nice job! Hope to get my daughter her first moose here in a couple of weeks.

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    Member AKsoldier's Avatar
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    Congrats to you both! I have four girls, and I hope to have similar experiences when they are old enough.

    The other 299,300,000 people can have it.

    Noone has a more intimate understanding of, or deeper appreciation for freedom, than a soldier who has fought for it in a country where it does not exist.

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    Member IceKing02's Avatar
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    RamblinRaven,

    Thanks for the clarification. That description makes perfect sense to me!

    IceKing02

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