Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: 370gr Hardcast in a .375Ruger

  1. #1
    Member hodgeman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Delta Junction AK
    Posts
    4,057

    Default 370gr Hardcast in a .375Ruger

    I recently traded for another Ruger .375Alaskan and it came with a good quantity of custom loaded ammo- both .300gr TSX and some rather unusual looking 370gr hardcast lead rounds.

    Just out of curiousity- how fast would a round that heavy be leaving the muzzle? I don't have access to a chrony right now so I'm looking for educated guesses.

    Other than shooting through a battleship hull, what would you do with a long chunk of lead like that? I'm guessing stem to stern penetration would be the order of the day.

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    3,568

    Default

    Generally cast bullets are loaded to lower velocities. Loads are dependent on the type of alloy used, if the bullet is gas checked, rate of twist, etc.
    In general, it is often more challenging to find an accurate cast load than it is for jacketed bullets.
    If you don't have access to a chrono, pull one of the bullets and try to identify the powder and the charge weight.
    Short answer, you need to find a chrono to be sure.
    Tennessee

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    welfare state of Alaska
    Posts
    5,153

    Default

    Lead bullets in the large bore rifles offer a number of advantages over jacketed bullets.

    First off - they are inexpensive compared to jacketed bullets - esp. if you cast your own - and offer the shooter the opportunity to practice with the rifle far more than most can afford with jacketed bullets. With cast bullets I can casually plink with my .375s or .458s - something I could never do with jacketed bullets. With heavy bullets like you have you may be able to dublicate the point of impact.

    Second- they allow the rifle to be used for other game. A cast bullet in a .375 is great for deer etc. - much like the old .38-40 and .38-55. You can even use them for rabbits and deer. Heavy bullets at low velocity are great killers without messing up a lot of meat.

    Third- they are are easy on your expensive cases. With light loads and the proper sized bullet you may not even need to resize the cases.

    Quote Originally Posted by hodgeman View Post
    I recently traded for another Ruger .375Alaskan and it came with a good quantity of custom loaded ammo- both .300gr TSX and some rather unusual looking 370gr hardcast lead rounds.

    Just out of curiousity- how fast would a round that heavy be leaving the muzzle? I don't have access to a chrony right now so I'm looking for educated guesses.

    Other than shooting through a battleship hull, what would you do with a long chunk of lead like that? I'm guessing stem to stern penetration would be the order of the day.
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
    ".. ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country" JFK

  4. #4
    Member 1Cor15:19's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Dillingham, AK
    Posts
    2,482

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Snowwolfe View Post
    Short answer, you need to find a chrono to be sure.
    Gotta agree with Snowwolfe, there's no other way for you to be certain about the velocity in YOUR rifle.

    As for what they are good for, I'd say they'll kill anything you'd hunt in NA. A 3/8 inch hole is a formidable wound in its own right...
    Foolishness is a moral category, not an intellectual one.

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Eureka MT
    Posts
    3,048

    Default

    A normal velocity for a cast bullet in a rifle is about 1800fps. A 370 gr cast at 1800 will plow it's way through a large brown bear breaking large bones on the way. Depending on how they are loaded they could be going anywhere from 1000fps to 2200fps + and as was said only a crony will tell for sure. Depending on velocity and how hard (how brittle), they could be very effective on anything in Ak to about 200 yds. Despite the trend in the new premium bullets, the lowly cast bullet can still be a very good killer especially in the larger calibers. I have a 416Rem for which I cast a 365gr bullet. I am hoping to get 2200 to 2300fps with accuracy with a medium hard bullet. If I get there, factory bullets are no longer needed and I can shoot for the cost of powder and primers. The problem you may run into with the 370gr in your .375 is it may be difficult to stabalize a bullet that long. Stem to stern penatration is not a bad thing.

  6. #6

    Default

    While the 375 anything is a formidable weapon. I don't believe a 370 grn bullet regardless of it's composition will stabilize with the rifling twist . Since the 375 is designed with 270 to 300 grn bullets in mind these bullets are 25% too long for the rifling, and will be launched at extremely low velocities; plus they'll need to be seated extremely deep as well.
    " Americans will never need the 2nd Amendment, until the government tries to take it away."

    On the road of life..... Pot holes keep things interesting !

  7. #7
    Member hodgeman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Delta Junction AK
    Posts
    4,057

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by brav01 View Post
    While the 375 anything is a formidable weapon. I don't believe a 370 grn bullet regardless of it's composition will stabilize with the rifling twist . Since the 375 is designed with 270 to 300 grn bullets in mind these bullets are 25% too long for the rifling, and will be launched at extremely low velocities; plus they'll need to be seated extremely deep as well.
    I thought about that aspect as well... I guess at bear defense ranges it wouldn't really matter much if it stabilized or not. I can only assume that's what they're for since "normal" 270 and 300gr slugs will kill anything here- generally with aplomb. I think I'll shoot a few at 100yds and see if I get keyholing. My buddy with the chrony is out of town for a while maybe its a good reason to buy one...hmmm.

    The TSX has a good reputation although I've never gotten good results with them. I've got so many with the rifle I can really give them a good try.

  8. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hodgeman View Post
    I thought about that aspect as well... I guess at bear defense ranges it wouldn't really matter much if it stabilized or not. I can only assume that's what they're for since "normal" 270 and 300gr slugs will kill anything here- generally with aplomb. I think I'll shoot a few at 100yds and see if I get keyholing. My buddy with the chrony is out of town for a while maybe its a good reason to buy one...hmmm.

    The TSX has a good reputation although I've never gotten good results with them. I've got so many with the rifle I can really give them a good try.
    I've read, many years ago in Africa professional hunters experienced improved performance with the 375 H&H by loading it down to 375 flanged performance as well as improved extraction. I believe this was due to bullet technology of the era. I'ld think that loading the TSX to 375 H&H specs would put it back into the speed range at which it was designed before the advent of the 375 Ruger.
    I also believe that a flat based round-nosed lead bullet at between 1800-2100 fps would be very lethal on all game out to 200 yds.

    Don't just check for key-holing check to make sure the bullet doesn't yaw and tumble once you have impact. This could cause bullet failure and line of penetration deviation .
    Also check the bore for leading , if anyone has fired lead projectiles at high velocities without the proper lube or of a poor quality/hardness your bore could have some build-up.
    " Americans will never need the 2nd Amendment, until the government tries to take it away."

    On the road of life..... Pot holes keep things interesting !

  9. #9

    Default

    The TSX has a good reputation although I've never gotten good results with them. I've got so many with the rifle I can really give them a good try.[/QUOTE]

    It took me a while to find a load that my 375 Ruger liked. Ended up with great results. 300gn TSX, 72gn Reloader 17 powder, CCI magnum primer. 3.326" OAL. I don't have a chrony, but per the chart, I should be shooting about 2200fps. The OAL proved to very critical to the accuracy in my gun. Good Luck.

  10. #10
    Member GrassLakeRon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Grass Lake Michigan
    Posts
    1,978

    Default

    I had a box of DoubleTap 350 gr. Woodliegh Weldcore Protected Points shot very well out of my Remington 700 XCR 375 H&H. Advertised velocity is 2450 fps. I would think a 370 gr would be close enough for 100 yard bear thumpings......

  11. #11
    Member Matt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    3,410

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hodgeman View Post
    Other than shooting through a battleship hull, what would you do with a long chunk of lead like that? I'm guessing stem to stern penetration would be the order of the day.
    I'd be looking to try one out on a grizzly bear. Is there a good population of bears around your place?

  12. #12
    Member hodgeman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Delta Junction AK
    Posts
    4,057

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Matt View Post
    I'd be looking to try one out on a grizzly bear. Is there a good population of bears around your place?
    The thought has crossed my mind....

    Going moose hunting over the weekend and I'll likely pack it along in case I get an opportunity.

  13. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    O'Fallon, MO
    Posts
    195

    Default

    Lead bullets are much shorter for their weight than jacketed bullets because of the density of lead and the typically flat-nosed designs. Stability should not be a factor, even at low velocities. Even at 1500 fps, they would be more powerful than any +P+ .44 mag load.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •