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Thread: Hunting guide presumed dead......

  1. #1
    Member STEELHED's Avatar
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    Angry Hunting guide presumed dead......

    http://www.adn.com/2011/08/30/203936...f-missing.html

    PFD's guys. they save lives..........RIP

  2. #2
    kxj66ni
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    Quote Originally Posted by STEELHED View Post
    http://www.adn.com/2011/08/30/203936...f-missing.html

    PFD's guys. they save lives..........RIP
    Are yoo asuming he wasnt wareing a life jacket just because hes a guide? not surprising

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    Member hooternanny's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by STEELHED View Post
    http://www.adn.com/2011/08/30/203936...f-missing.html

    PFD's guys. they save lives..........RIP
    seeing that your an assistant guide too, i bet this hits quite close to home for you. amazing how the article says he had no pfd, 10 Minutes later he's gone missing.

    prayers to the fam & all involved.

    i thank you for posting.

    PFD'S IN ALL ALASKA WATERS
    edit signature here

  4. #4
    Member STEELHED's Avatar
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    I'm not assuming anything, just stating a fact that PFD's will at least give you a "chance".....

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    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    tough loss...sometimes we get one chance at things, no do overs or re-try's....least he didn't go plugged into the wall somewhere, i'd rather get swallowed up by the land i love.
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    Member mjm316's Avatar
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    I talked with Don aka Smokey today. He sounded extremely rough like I've never heard him before. This has to be extremely tough for him as I know Brian was a very close friend of his also. Thoughts and prayers go out to all of them
    Tomorrow isn't promised. "Never delay kissing a pretty girl or opening a bottle of whiskey." E. Hemingway

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    Premium Member MarineHawk's Avatar
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    Sad story. My prayers go out to the family as well.

    For safety education purposes, because I honestly don't know, what do you think could have caused him to drown? I've been further up river this time of year, and the Nushagak was pretty calm everywhere. Is it faster down near Koliganek? This is what it looked like a year ago:





    I'm not in the slightest suggesting one should not wear a PFD, but I wonder what happened here. If you knew how to swim, it seems like you would have to be incapacitated (knocked out, heart attack, or something) to drown in that river.

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    The water is very, very cold. Here on the Kuskokwim the temps run about +36*F during the summer. It doesn't take long at all. Shock of going in, confusion about which way to go....
    Great spirits have always found violent opposition from mediocre minds. The latter cannot understand it when a man does not thoughtlessly submit to hereditary prejudices but honestly and courageously uses his intelligence. Albert Einstein

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  9. #9
    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
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    Very unfortunate. Sorry to hear.
    BK

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    I posted it on a fishing thread but my wife and I fished a couple young men (alive) out of the lakes near Dillingham a month or so ago....they lost control of the tiller, it whipped around and they were thrown out....can happen just that fast. They had no PFD's on, and luckily we were within sight. Without us or a PFD they had no chance. Buy a PFD that's comfortable enough that you actually wear it, and this may have been a "There I was" story instead of a next of kin story. RIP to the fella, but may his demise wisen up some others.

    Not completely related but the Nushagak is much warmer than the kusko, temps even in July approach sixty, but this man is gone nonetheless.

  11. #11
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Good reminder. Just this morning over breakfast my wife suggested that we bring our PFDs on this weekend's sheep hunt. I wouldn't normally think to do so, but we'll be crossing a relatively swift river right where we leave our machines. We won't carry the PFDs up the mountain with us, but her suggestion that we start with them is a wise one - even more so in light of news like this.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    Good reminder. Just this morning over breakfast my wife suggested that we bring our PFDs on this weekend's sheep hunt. I wouldn't normally think to do so, but we'll be crossing a relatively swift river right where we leave our machines. We won't carry the PFDs up the mountain with us, but her suggestion that we start with them is a wise one - even more so in light of news like this.
    A good example of the positives of going into the wilderness with a woman...they think of things like this and get into less trouble.

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    Member jkb's Avatar
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    Brian makes a good point as I was crossing the toolik with 90 lbs of caribou on my back by myself I remembered to unbuckle my pack straps in case I fell down.
    Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming-----WOW-----what a ride!
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    Member ironartist's Avatar
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    there a few inteligent posts here folks, somethings got ta be wrong
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    Member Smokey's Avatar
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    Lets face it, as men we get careless and have a "I can beat the odds attitude" way too much. I have spent a large amount of my life on the water and have had way more dumb close calls than I want to remember - besides the PFD and the Kill Switch line ya have to wonder why we don't take another minute to tether some kind of line from the boat to our body somehow when out alone or in rough conditions? It sure would not take much to run a line from ones belt to the boat someplace so you would not lose your craft if ya went over for some reason...
    When I used to trap a lot I ran rivers and used a 12ft jon boat - had a 20ft 1/4in rope tied to it, and me, as I jumped out often to make a set or drag over a sandbar - just became another part of the process....
    May this chap RIP for sure....
    When asked what state I live in I say "The State of Confusion", better known as IL....

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    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    not sure if you've ever fall in a river with a heavy pack on, but i have and the waist belt is the least of the problems. i'd heard to always unbuckle before you cross as well...100lbs+ on a spring bear hide and i went down in a swollen river, floating down river with just my head above water, client running down the bank. the problem is the shoulder straps all the weight pulling your arms down..the waist belt had no tension on it and came off just fine. the added stability of having the waist belt fastened far out weighs the "benefits" of unbuckling it. no to take this thread on a bunny trail..but while we are mentioning saftey while hunting i think this guide that is lost would support us sharing tidbits that might help others down the road.
    use tragedy for good and the world will improve.
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    Member jkb's Avatar
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    I had always assumed that advice was to help you get away from the pack if it pinned you down. Never thought about floating away with the pack, but I have never tried to cross a stream that big with a pack on.
    Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming-----WOW-----what a ride!
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  18. #18
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    getting away from the pack would be eaiser if i could have gotten the shoulder straps off thats what held me down..waist belt was a non issue...i remember that freezing water and a little panic for sure and i unbuckled my waist belt and thought...it was a load of crap!! then i couldn't get the shoulder straps off...then i realized i'd been mislead!
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    Member willphish4food's Avatar
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    Thanks for that tidbit, Jake. I know when my time comes, if its from a preventable accident I won't mind at all looking down and hearing conversations on how to prevent others from dying the same way. I feel awful for this man's family and friends; may some good come from his end.

  20. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by BRWNBR View Post
    getting away from the pack would be eaiser if i could have gotten the shoulder straps off thats what held me down..waist belt was a non issue...i remember that freezing water and a little panic for sure and i unbuckled my waist belt and thought...it was a load of crap!! then i couldn't get the shoulder straps off...then i realized i'd been mislead!
    In girl scouts we were told to clasp our hands on our chest under thi packing stgraps if we might had to shed the pack fast. by just moving the wrists away from the chest the straps go over the shoulders and we were free of the pack. Do guides not do this.
    So sorry about this tragedy.
    Connie

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