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Thread: Goose Creek Silvers meat goes bad faster?

  1. #1

    Default Goose Creek Silvers meat goes bad faster?

    Anybody else fishing and keeping silvers from Goose Creek (mile 93 Parks Hwy)?

    I have fished Goose Creek twice over the last week and kept good looking fish, only to find that the meat looks very light colored. Now one fish was blush to getting red in color, but the others looked chrome bright and fresh. They all looked like spawned out fire engine red fish on the inside. They all had a very light pink color, and did not look like good silvers.

    Just wondering if others have noticed the same thing? Are the fish in this creek different? Can they be going bad faster because of something in the water?

  2. #2
    Member c6 batmobile's Avatar
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    Could have been the way you handled them as well. If the fish arent bled quickly and kept cool the meat can get mushy.
    Makin fur fins and feathers fly.

  3. #3

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    Not sure of the reasoning of the meat being such poor quality in fresh appearing fish, but it has happened to me last year on a valdez labor day trip aswell. Dime bright fish thats flesh turned out to be far from red and much less firm than you would have expected.

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    Member Raptor_1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by c6 batmobile View Post
    Could have been the way you handled them as well. If the fish arent bled quickly and kept cool the meat can get mushy.
    That wouldn't cause the light pink color. I'm gonna go ahead and assume he had them in the water after the kill which would have kept them plenty cool (don't know though, could be wrong Nanook?). Don't think it's stream specific either. We caught some silvers out of Seward in July that were mushy to. Might be ocean diet? Dunno?
    Alaska: We're all here cuz we're not all "there"

  5. #5

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    No, fished with my neighbor, and we handled the fish like we normally do. Bonked and bleed them, and then strung them in the water for no more than 2 hours. Had kept one I caught on Little Willow earlier that day that was in the cooler for several hours, and it was fine. I had two from Goose last Wed that looked good on the outside, that were mussy inside. And then we had the same thing with all our fish (from Goose) on Monday. Not gonna keep any more from there this year!

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    Member Sierra Dragon's Avatar
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    You sure they were silvers and not big bright Pinks?

  7. #7

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    Come on, really? Pinks? most of them are dead now as are many of the chums on that creek. I am absolutely positive that we caught and kept silvers. They looked good outside, but mussy inside. I have seen this with some females going soft early but we had a few males that were mushy too. Goose is not the most popular creek, but i just wanted to see if anyone else out there has kept silvers from there recently and noticed the same issue. It seemed strange to me. Going back tomorrow to try again, but not planning on keeping any.

  8. #8

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    I have had the same issue in the past with fresh looking Silvers in Goose and a few other arenas that far from salt. Did a little test over a couple years and found it only was females. I think ?? It has something to do with the females feeding their eggs. I started keeping only males and have not had a problem since. Don't know, works for me.

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    Member willphish4food's Avatar
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    Don't ever put dead fish back in the water. Think about it; what breaks down the flesh of already dead fish in the stream? What breeds and proliferates the more dead fish there are? Bacteria; and they don't distinguish your dead fish from any other dead fish in the stream. By this time of year literally tens of thousands of pinks, chums, and some kings have died and rotted in all these streams, feeding bacteria. The bacteria in the water do a very efficient job at breaking down flesh, and begin as soon as a fish dies, and the levels now are as high as they'll ever be.

    The air temps are cool enough, that just leaving the fish on the bank is preferable to in the water. A cooler and ice are the best, but next best is to bleed, gut, and place in shade, and pull a bunch of grass, wet it down, and place over the fish. The evaporation of the water will help keep the fish cool, and the grass if laid on thick enough will keep the flies off it. A wet towel works very well, too.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by MTguy View Post
    I have had the same issue in the past with fresh looking Silvers in Goose and a few other arenas that far from salt. Did a little test over a couple years and found it only was females. I think ?? It has something to do with the females feeding their eggs. I started keeping only males and have not had a problem since. Don't know, works for me.
    I also have had the same experience, once on Wasilla Creek and once on the Kashwitna. Both were caught in late August and both were females. Both were bright. I did notice that the eggs were larger and the meat was butter knife soft.

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    The shorter the trip for the salmon, the quicker they get flaccid and slimy. Fish which have a longer journey have more oil in their flesh and something which protects them longer in fresh water. Not sure what that is, but I've noticed it in nearly forty years of salmon catching.

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    As soon as a salmon starts the process of returning to spawn, they begin to die. They stop eating and all of the stores in thier bodies go to the development of eggs or milt and keeping the fish alive. The fish that have a long way to go to spawn are built with more oils, fats in their bodies in order to keep them alive long enough to make the journey. (ex: Copper River Reds or Spring salmon on the Washington and Oregon coast who enter the river an March and don't spawn until Sept) Fish that spawn close to the salt don't have these stores and that is why you will catch chrome fish with mushy, off colored meat. They are designed to only spend a short amount of time in fresh water.

  13. #13

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    The information I have says that some salmon late in a run especially females turn soft with pale flesh even when still bright. Also that salmon early on in a run may be showing a lot of spawning colors and still be good on the inside. Weird stuff to me......

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