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Thread: best muzzle break for recoil reduction

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    Default best muzzle break for recoil reduction

    Wanted to get thoughts and reccomendation on what muzzle breaks offer the most recoil reduction. I am not concerned about noise at this point just want recoil gone. The break would be going on a "lightweight" 300 RUM...

    I do want something that comes close to the barrel diameter, not some .50 cal looking anti take break.

    I have looked at vais, shrewd, gentry, kdf, accubrake....Which is best?

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    Member Kay9Cop's Avatar
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    Well the best recoil reduction will come from those tank brakes, which is why they are used on such large caliber guns. I shot a .338 Lapua Magnum with a JP Enterprises brake and it was no worse than a .30-06.

    If you want good reduction you need a brake with a flat surface for the gasses to push against. If you want to control muzzle flip you need ports on top, but not on the bottom. I think a good brake for a hunting rifle is the Holland QD brake. I put one on a Kimber .300 WSM and it made that gun a real ***** cat to shoot.
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    The Stan Jackson brake worked well on the 338 I shot. Stupid loud but easy on the shoulder and it was a fairly slim. The savage tank brake on my cousins 338 Lap was huge but made it super tame! Double hearing protection is a must for either type.

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    we pride ourselves on offering the quietest brake on the market, with the most recoil reduction
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    I wondered about the wildwest brake. I have one on a 375 ultra mag but man the thought of wearing hearing protections sucks so that why I haven't really hunted with it. Well I also got it a few months back. the brake works great I shoot that thing off the bench with no Led Slead kicks like an 06. I want to take it on a caribou hunt but the Brake has me wondering so Wildalaksa just how loud is the brake if one forgot to wear hearing protection out on the tundra shooting at caribou???
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    as loud as your rifle. The brake doesnt make it really louder ( I think it was 1.4db) qua louder, its just that the sound is redirected
    Ken
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    I've installed 4 or 5 hundred or more muzzle brakes. Vais and KDF primarily, although there were others including K&P brakes on 50's, like the Armalite AR-50 brake. And a J.P. or two. In my humble,(hah) opinion, they are pretty much the same if you are looking at a cylindrical brake with holes drilled around its circumference. The difference between one and the other is what I would call "statistcally insignificant". Others will claim "the best" or "mine is different because", but in the end they all do essentially the same thing. Just don't drill holes directly in your barrel.
    Last edited by gunbugs; 08-29-2011 at 18:05. Reason: Darn shpelling
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    I have two Vais brakes. One on a 375 Ruger and the other on a 300RUM. The brakes are very effective and accuracy was unaffected or perhaps improved. I use hearing protection with all rifle shooting, hearing is not replaceable. Brakes in general do seem louder due to the noise being redirected back towards the shooter. They don't increase the noise they just send it back at you.

    I have an Elite Iron brake on a 338 Lapua that works very well. I have shot over 100 rounds in an afternoon with no discomfort. This brake is good for prone shooting because the gas is directed to the sides not down. The Vais is poor for prone as the dirt will blow in your face.


    http://www.eliteiron.net/elite-iron-MuzzleBrakes.html



    Elite Iron Brake.jpg DSC01249.JPG

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    Plenty of research on the web if you look for it. Measure the sound pressure at the ear.

    My BIL had a Savage with a brake, he sold it after he fired one shot on a hunt up in the Brooks Range. Now he has permanent deafness in his left ear.

    Brakes are dangerous, and inconsiderate at the range. Fine if you are by yourself, but otherwise, you should learn to shoot the rifle, or buy yourself a rifle/cartridge you can shoot without flinching.

    You could always wear your plugs and a pair of electronic muffs to amplify normal sounds so you can hear, or take the brake off when you are in the field.
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  10. #10

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    Gunbugs
    I have several guns with Brakes put on at KDF, each gun had caps made, great to practice then take the brake off for hunting. Do you build to caps when you install the KDFs?

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    Ocaisionally a customer will ask for a thread protector. Maybe 3or 4 out of 100. Most folks just leave the brake on.
    "A strong body makes the mind strong. As to the species of exercises, I advise the gun. While this gives moderate exercise to the body, it gives boldness, enterprise, and independence to the mind."

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    A guy had a big bore, I didn't get too close to check it out, down the line at Birchwood the other morning with big side vents on the brake. No one else could shoot. I seriously wondered if it might bust windows on the trucks nearby. The concussion was brutal. To re-direct muzzle blast at other shooters just such an inconsiderate thing to do at a firing line. I'm never going to get off my soap box about this. A rifle can be sighted in using a lead sled, and practiced with using a shoulder pad. There's not a rifle made that can't be fired without a compensator for hunting purposes. (just hold your mouth shut so that you don't chip a tooth during recoil!) Most rifles that are large enough to need one don't get shot like a varmint rifle anyway due to cost and noise. (thousands of times) When I shoot at an animal. I rarely remember the recoil.

    I've got hearing loss now. I'm apt to not do anything to harm what little hearing I've got left. It's such a pain to hunt with hearing protection. We've all seen the zillion posts on muzzle blasts effects on hearing. The sound and pressure levels exceed even what quality hearing protection can stop, even double protection of plugs and muffs! Anyone who uses these around kids is really doing harm.
    "Recorded noise levels (on certified audiological instruments) at the muzzle of a magnum or high velocity rifle with a muzzle break normally exceed 160 decibels. Permanent ear damage occurs at 120 decibels. If you read the fine print on the finest set of [COLOR=#0033CC !important]ear plugs
    and ear muffs available, you will find the total noise reduction only between 22 and 31 decibels. This means that on a rifle with a muzzle brake, even if you are wearing hearing protection, you are suffering permanent damage."


    Perhaps there should be shooting times for all the guys who have compensators on their firearms to shoot together. They'd be the guys standing around in the office yelling at each other...

    I wish like heck that I had a silencer installed on every rifle I own. I saw a guy pull up at Birchwood and pull out this nice .338 Lapua. He had the rear facing chevron muzzle brake. It was knocking papers off of my bench two benches away! Everyone just got up and watched him. No one could concentrate on shooting with that nonsense going on. After several rounds, he looked around and noticed everyone standing back waiting. He understood immediately. He said "Oh, sorry" and went to his truck, pulled off the compensator, and put a silencer on the thing! Oh man, that was one sweeeeet machine after that. Amazing difference. Stunningly accurate, and a pleasure to shoot. (He let me park one in the bullseye at 200 yards)

    I'd really like to see how one of these works too. Anyone have one that can comment?

    http://www.bp-tec.com/recoil.htm
    Last edited by Sir; 08-30-2011 at 23:01. Reason: link

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    While I don't own a rifle with a brake I will disagree with you about the LeadSled. I would never put one of my heavy recoiling rifles in one of those stock breaking *******s. Also recoil is perceived differently by different people. Some of us are either tough or too stupid to let it bother them while others don't take recoil well at all from even moderate recoiling rifles. I would much rather a guy have a 338 with a brake that he can shoot then see him or her go hunt moose or bears with a 243. If it is what you need to make you a better shooter it is your hearing and your choice. Rifles are loud, with or without a brake, I don't care what anyone says. If youre shooting without ear protection you are a dumbass. Some hunt with ear protection and some choose not to, if you choose not to it is your hearing, and you are going to lose some of it brake or no brake.

    I just wish people would stop hacking on guys and gals who shoot braked rifles, it their gun and their ears. I don't like synthetic stocks, I know they work and I install a ton of them. But I choose not to put them on my rifles, and yet I don't harp on people who want one about getting a wood stock instead. I cannot stand the looks of a SS rifle, but I build a ton of them for guys that like them, it their money and their rifle and I leave it at that.

    Friends don't let friends shoot wood stocked rifles in LeadSleds.

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    I agree with a lot of what you're saying Kid, but probably differ on a couple of things:

    * Hearing loss is cumulative, and I don't think a few unbraked outside rifle shots each year while hunting is going to ruin your hearing, and I would hate to try to hunt without being able too hear what's going on around me.

    * Unbraked rifes are definitely loud, to be sure, but that doesn't take away from the fact that braked rifles are loudER. Degrees sometimes matter.

    * For people who shoot braked rifles, it is their ears, except when they are at a public range. Most brakes divert a lot of the pressure laterally (or, as my son used to say when he was three, "sidewards"). In my experience, most braked rifles are louder when you're next to one at the range than when you are shooting one. It's hard to argue that it is not extremely annoying to be at the range when one of these is diverting a big cartridge's pressure and gas almost directly onto your head from only a few feet away. Not saying people shouldn't buy them, but if I ever had one on a hunting rifle, it would be a removable one for hunting and use at any public range, especially if someone's kids are around. Just out of courtesy.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarineHawk View Post
    I agree with a lot of what you're saying Kid, but probably differ on a couple of things:

    * Hearing loss is cumulative, and I don't think a few unbraked outside rifle shots each year while hunting is going to ruin your hearing, and I would hate to try to hunt without being able too hear what's going on around me.

    * Unbraked rifes are definitely loud, to be sure, but that doesn't take away from the fact that braked rifles are loudER. Degrees sometimes matter.

    * For people who shoot braked rifles, it is their ears, except when they are at a public range. Most brakes divert a lot of the pressure laterally (or, as my son used to say when he was three, "sidewards"). In my experience, most braked rifles are louder when you're next to one at the range than when you are shooting one. It's hard to argue that it is not extremely annoying to be at the range when one of these is diverting a big cartridge's pressure and gas almost directly onto your head from only a few feet away. Not saying people shouldn't buy them, but if I ever had one on a hunting rifle, it would be a removable one for hunting and use at any public range, especially if someone's kids are around. Just out of courtesy.
    Good, MarineHawk:
    Those are ALL excellent points you make.

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    Ah, but we digress. The question asked was not do you love brakes or hate brakes. But what is the best brake. Seems anytime someone asks a question about muzzle brakes, it devolves into a brake hater session.
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    Okay, as I suggested, the best brake is one that is removable if and when you go to the range or hunt.

  18. #18

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    I am also in the removable Brake crowd. I've had the KDF and the Wild West Brake systems in the past. The Wild West was a fine Brake and the one I had on was of course removable and had a thread cap to put on when Brake was off. I never Hunted with the darn things on.

  19. #19

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    I bought a 338 wm that had a wild west brake on it. I love it. You don't want to be beside it but shooting it is no problem without protection while hunting. I have been around a few other brakes and didn't care for any of them. I was pleasantly surprised by the wild west brake.

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    The best brake I have found is a lead sled...

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