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Thread: The right Canoe?

  1. #1
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    Default The right Canoe?

    Hi..new to the forum..looking for advice. Looking to buy a canoe that would be good for trip down mellower rivers..ie, certain portions of the Kenai..maybe the Yukon at some point, and would also be good for, say, a weekend trip on the Swan Lake trails. I know there are no perfect boats for all situations, but wondering what might be a good compromise canoe. Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    Moderator Alaskacanoe's Avatar
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    Default best canoes

    This has come up so often, that it is some times better to just read through some of the posts from the various users of canoes,
    This way you can sort thru the bias.
    Here is just one of the prvious threads about such topics.
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ad.php?t=10112

    I short though, I would go with a 16 ft Roylex canoe such as the Mad river duck hunter, or the Old Town Camper or if you have canoe skills, the penobscot.
    those are my first choices in all around canoes for what you are talking about.
    Max
    When you come to a fork in the trail, take it!

    Rentals for Canoes, Kayaks, Rafts, boats serving the Kenai canoe trail system and the Kenai river for over 15 years. www.alaskacanoetrips.com

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    Default good canoe

    if you talk about big rivers the old 19 ft grummin fr. if you want to pack it you want a light one about 17 ft fred myers has some that are not bad, if you don't pack it the 19 ft is the way to go the 19 FT comes in at about 115 lbs [heavy]

  4. #4

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    I have had my Dad's square stern grummin for a long time. When it was time to add another, I chose a kevlar 17ft. Wenonah Spirit II. It is light for portaging, goes well on flat water and has some rocker for maneuvering on streams. The draw back is that kevlar doesn't bounce off rocks very well. I've tried to avoid wicked white water with it, but have still had to do some patching.

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    Default correct conoe

    Quote Originally Posted by Planner View Post
    I have had my Dad's square stern grummin for a long time. When it was time to add another, I chose a kevlar 17ft. Wenonah Spirit II. It is light for portaging, goes well on flat water and has some rocker for maneuvering on streams. The draw back is that kevlar doesn't bounce off rocks very well. I've tried to avoid wicked white water with it, but have still had to do some patching.

    there is no correct conoe for all conoeing there is a little differance as my 19 ft weights in at about 125 [added some stuff to it, that don't come with it] I use a conoe portage unit from Cabelars on flat ground an my back for short distance on broken ground only, it will do all I need but for long distance a small one is the best, you can talk about all the new stuff they are made out of, they all work fine some do a better job that others but the cost goes up, so it boils down to 2 things
    "1" how deep your pockets are
    "2" an how strong your back is,
    so I don't do very much in the line of packing it very far
    Sid

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    Default

    What I don't like about aluminum canoes is the noise. Every time you bump it, sound goes echoing across the water. They also come to a screeching halt whenever you hit a rock. They don't slide over anything. They are durable though.

    I prefer plastic like Roylex, but it is just a personal choice, and I don't want to portage anything.

  7. #7

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    I've got a royalex old town penobscot 16 and love. it costs a little bit but it will do everything I ask it to for a lifetime. Solo river, solo lake, tandem too. I'm very happy with it at 70 lbs

  8. #8
    Moderator Alaskacanoe's Avatar
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    Default penobscot

    from the factory, these 16 foot Penobscot canoes weigh 58 lbs.
    I have no trouble portage with that weight.
    Quiet canoes also, as they have a foam layer in the lay up lam process.
    this makes them float so you don't need bulk heads. this is great because you gain so much more room in your canoe without bulk heads.

    I noticed an Aluminum canoe manufacture is now putting a foam layer type thing in their canoes so they are not so noisy.
    clang clang clang.. I hear you coming down the Swanson river..
    opps,, Clang,, I hit my paddle against the gunwhale, I hope Mr Moose did not hear that Clang...
    I have a couple of Aluminum canoes that I keep for those that want them in the fleet, and they sure are tough though.
    A Smoker Craft and one with that Indian chief head on the side,
    Great old boats. and they weigh about 62 lb and 78 lbs each. Different length and metal thickness.
    Max
    When you come to a fork in the trail, take it!

    Rentals for Canoes, Kayaks, Rafts, boats serving the Kenai canoe trail system and the Kenai river for over 15 years. www.alaskacanoetrips.com

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