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Thread: Breaking in a new 30-06 Kimber rifle

  1. #1

    Thumbs up Breaking in a new 30-06 Kimber rifle

    I am breaking in my new Kimber 8400 Montana in 30-06 tomorrow. Unless I get some other suggestions or pointed in a different direction I will do the following.

    Using 150gr factory ammunition (Winchester & Federals) I will take these steps.

    1. I will shoot one round and clean with bore slovent (foam solvent waiting 30min. for solvent to break down the copper) until the copper does not show up on any patch before I move one to fire the next round for five rounds.

    2. I will then shoot one group of three then clean as stated above and do this for 5 consectittive groups (15 rounds) or until no more copper shows up on a second patch while cleaning the barrel after a three round group). if at anytime during this process no copper shows up on a second patch after a three round group I will consider the barrel broke-in.

    3. I will continue the same proceedure of cleaning the barrel but for the next 20 rounds will shoot 4 five shot groups. (at anytime a second patch after a five shot group does not show copper I wii consider the barrel broke in).

  2. #2

    Default break in

    That is pretty close to how I broke my Kimber barrel in, except I shot 1 shot and cleaned it for 20 rounds before I started shooting 3 rounds. I have no complaints with how my Kimber shoots and I have always broke my barrels in using this method. have fun shooting

  3. #3

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    Well, the barrel was an exceptional barrel. I shot 6 rounds cleaning after them and by the 5th round I could run my patch through the barrel the sceond time and no blue on my patch and the third patch the barrel was clear of any carbon. I shot a group of three 165gr Sierra Game King HPBT and shot a .389 inch group and then shot a group of three 200gr Game King SBT and shot a .981 inch group. had to stop there. Was out of time but will go back tomorrow are Wed. and try to really shoot some tight groups. Accubond in 165 was an inch and a quarter.

  4. #4
    Member Bear Buster's Avatar
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    Default Breaking in new barrels

    Gale McMillan
    posted September 25, 1999 10:10 AM
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The break in fad was started by a fellow I helped get started in the barrel business . He started putting a set of break in instructions in ever barrel he shipped. One came into the shop to be installed and I read it and the next time I saw him I asked him What was with this break in crap?. His answer was Mac, My share of the market is about 700 barrels a year. I cater to the target crowd and they shoot a barrel about 3000 rounds before they change it. If each one uses up 100 rounds of each barrel breaking it in you can figure out how many more barrels I will get to make each year. If you will stop and think that the barrel doesn't know whether you are cleaning it every shot or every 5 shots and if you are removing all foreign material that has been deposited in it since the last time you cleaned it what more can you do? When I ship a barrel I send a recommendation with it that you clean it ever chance you get with a brass brush pushed through it at least 12 times with a good solvent and followed by two and only 2 soft patches. This means if you are a bench rest shooter you clean ever 7 or 8 rounds . If you are a high power shooter you clean it when you come off the line after 20 rounds. If you follow the fad of cleaning every shot for X amount and every 2 shots for X amount and so on the only thing you are accomplishing is shortening the life of the barrel by the amount of rounds you shot during this process. I always say Monkey see Monkey do, now I will wait on the flames but before you write them, Please include what you think is happening inside your barrel during break in that is worth the expense and time you are spending during break in.

    Just site it in then clean it after every day of shooting.
    Last edited by Bear Buster; 06-23-2007 at 17:49. Reason: quotes

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bear Buster View Post
    Just site it in then clean it after every day of shooting.
    Well God blessed me because the best plans of men and mice sometimes or upset. I was going to break it in but I was rushed to get my loads developed and that is all I did develope loads. Now was I smart and knew and understood that I really did not have to break in a barrel with some procedure that would insure my barrel would shoot good groups? NO!!!!! But as I said, God blessed me and took care of the ignorant and at the same time gave me rifle that really shoots.

    Infact here is the last fiveshot group I shot.

    A GUN WRITER NEEDS:
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  6. #6

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    I've been following a number of posts about break in procedures and started checking out the barrel makers sites. Your experience pretty much is an example of what John Kreiger explained about barrels and break in procedures. Some will take only a few shots before the copper fouling stops, and others will take more shots. From the looks of things you got a barrel that was chambered with a really sharp finish reamer. Lucky you.

  7. #7
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    Thumbs up

    I have read and heard first hand Gale McMillan's views on it and will certainly agree if all barrels are as smooth, out of the box, as one of his barrels. Break in or not what helps is a smooth barrel. If a barrel is rough as a cob, somebody or something has to smooth it up in order for it to shoot to it's full potential and clean up easily afterwards. If it comes from the box as smooth as a baby's buttocks and will shoot to our expectations, then any and every shot is "wearing out the barrel". If it is rough it needs to "worn" a little and nothing short of divine intervention will help it until it is.

    That said, I've had in my hands, to shoot, many rifles with bores that shot and cleaned up as well as any costing four times the price that needed nothing but good ammo. Some of these were on $200 rifles. I've also seen the opposite in the same brand.

    Beartooth,
    That's a pretty good break in procedure there, one thing I will say I've learned about break-in is that the cold/clean shot is one place and the warm/fouled group is in another until it is "broken in" then they come together.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Murphy View Post
    I have read and heard first hand Gale McMillan's views on it and will certainly agree if all barrels are as smooth, out of the box, as one of his barrels. Break in or not what helps is a smooth barrel. If a barrel is rough as a cob, somebody or something has to smooth it up in order for it to shoot to it's full potential and clean up easily afterwards. If it comes from the box as smooth as a baby's buttocks and will shoot to our expectations, then any and every shot is "wearing out the barrel". If it is rough it needs to "worn" a little and nothing short of divine intervention will help it until it is.

    That said, I've had in my hands, to shoot, many rifles with bores that shot and cleaned up as well as any costing four times the price that needed nothing but good ammo. Some of these were on $200 rifles. I've also seen the opposite in the same brand.

    Beartooth,
    That's a pretty good break in procedure there, one thing I will say I've learned about break-in is that the cold/clean shot is one place and the warm/fouled group is in another until it is "broken in" then they come together.
    Yes, I will have to agree about you comments. After reading a lot of post and think about my own experiences through the years, you have said what needs to be said and did so with few words. Thanks for your insight on this subject I could not have said it as well as you did. I really think there needs to be a balance. One can go through to much breakin or not enough and you said it, that it depends on how smooth the barrel is that you are beginning with. thanks
    A GUN WRITER NEEDS:
    THE MIND OF A SCHOLAR
    THE HEART OF A CHILD
    THE HIDE OF A RHINOCEROS

  9. #9

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    Murphy sparked these thoughts from me and this is how I see this issure. There really needs to be a balance and this is true with most things in life. One can go through to much breakin or not enough and it depends on how smooth the barrel is that you are beginning with. Yes, if you get a barrel like McMillians or a Lilja or even a 300 dollar rifle as I have that only took a few rounds and it was ready to go then you don't need to go through some long method that someone prescribes as though all barrels need it. But if it is rough it could take a while and it won't shoot real tight groups if it is not smooth. Now some who can't shoot well or don't reload rounds that really work well in their barrel might tend to think that it is the barrel. Most of the time with rifles today if they do not shoot is due to the shooter. Most rifles really don't take long and I own a few that only took sight in of my scope and it was ready to go. Thanks Murphy, you got me to strike a balance.
    A GUN WRITER NEEDS:
    THE MIND OF A SCHOLAR
    THE HEART OF A CHILD
    THE HIDE OF A RHINOCEROS

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