Results 1 to 15 of 15

Thread: Question about SC guided halibut fishing

  1. #1
    Member Phish Finder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Searching for more cowbell!
    Posts
    1,945

    Default Question about SC guided halibut fishing

    If the halibut is reduced to 1 halibut/day, won't the guide boats start fishing for larger halibut (breed stock)? This, in my mind, would have a far more drastic impact on total halibut numbers than hitting a chicken patch for a couple of small fish.

    I only halibut fish for freezer filling as it's not overly exciting to me.

    What's your take?
    ><((((º>¸.·´¯`·.¸¸.·´¯`·..¸¸ ><((((º>`·.¸¸¸.·´¯`·.¸¸><((((º>

    "People who drink light 'beer' don't like the taste of beer; they
    just like to pee a lot." --Capitol Brewery

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    499

    Default

    Yes they will probably have to target bigger fish in order to sell trips. Instead of two fifteen pounders charter guys will now feel like they need to get their client a 30 pounder. But then once charter guys in cook inlet start catching too many big fish the comm guys will put a size restriction on them like they did to the guys in SE.

    Trips could also be sold easier if king and silver runs were enhanced in cook inlet so more combo trips could be sold. Feeder kings made the early season cook inlet salt water trolling go from what would have been below average to a good year. Many days feeder kings caught outnumbered spawning kings caught. Back when crooked creek and the ninilchik river were enhanced with good numbers of kings, the kings were always hot off deep creek and southern cook inlet. Once enhancement stopped the king runs and catch rates have slowly dwindled until luckily this year was saved by feeder kings.

    Unguided anglers are next to get one halibut a day restrictions and the only way that wont happen is if the public who elected our Alaska senators in Washington can get them to fight for the little guys. But since campaign contributions come from the industries it will be tough. The solution is to not reelect them and find someone that will serve Alaska's fisheries the best.

  3. #3

    Default

    I ran a bunch of charters in SE the year we went down to 1 halibut. Almost every single client said the exact same thing when I told them the limit was only 1 halibut... "Ok, but we'll get a big one, right?" And we did. They took of fleet of charters on the west coast of POW that was content with 12lb halibut, and forced them to find bigger halibut, on a daily basis. The average size went up, and we still got cut back further. A few years later, we got hit with the 37" max size limit. You have to realize that reducing the number of fish by 50% doesn't equal a 50% reduction in weight, which is what matters when a GHL is involved.


    Quote Originally Posted by Phish Finder View Post
    If the halibut is reduced to 1 halibut/day, won't the guide boats start fishing for larger halibut (breed stock)? This, in my mind, would have a far more drastic impact on total halibut numbers than hitting a chicken patch for a couple of small fish.

    I only halibut fish for freezer filling as it's not overly exciting to me.

    What's your take?

  4. #4
    New member
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Soldotna
    Posts
    5,639

    Question Why . . . ?

    Quote Originally Posted by 270ti View Post
    . . when I told them the limit was only 1 halibut... "Ok, but we'll get a big one, right?" And we did. They took of fleet of charters on the west coast of POW that was content with 12lb halibut, and forced them to find bigger halibut, on a daily basis. The average size went up, . .
    Why is it that king anglers will gladly pay a Kasilof guide for a trip that targets, what, an average king of about 15 pounds or so yet balk at paying a halibut charter for the same size halibut? Are halibut charters nothing but an attempt to subsidize the fishing experience with coolers full of meat?

  5. #5
    Member Phish Finder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Searching for more cowbell!
    Posts
    1,945

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Marcus View Post
    Are halibut charters nothing but an attempt to subsidize the fishing experience with coolers full of meat?
    For me, a halibut charter is a way to reduce the costs of halibut so I can eat it more often. I don't halibut fish for the fun of it, though it can be very enjoyable. I compare cost to meat when halibut fishing. I'm happy with 30-40 lbs of halibut filets for the cost of the charter. That makes the fish less expensive than buying it from the store plus the joy of fishing (being on a boat, meeting new folks, etc...). When the cost of a charter is higher than the cost of buying the same fish from the grocer, my halibut fishing will decrease dramatically, as will my intake.

    270, this line sums up my reasoning, "You have to realize that reducing the number of fish by 50&#37; doesn't equal a 50% reduction in weight, which is what matters when a GHL is involved."


    Isn't this approach somewhat counterproductive and will mandate a slot or size limit?
    ><((((º>¸.·´¯`·.¸¸.·´¯`·..¸¸ ><((((º>`·.¸¸¸.·´¯`·.¸¸><((((º>

    "People who drink light 'beer' don't like the taste of beer; they
    just like to pee a lot." --Capitol Brewery

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Marcus View Post
    Why is it that king anglers will gladly pay a Kasilof guide for a trip that targets, what, an average king of about 15 pounds or so yet balk at paying a halibut charter for the same size halibut? Are halibut charters nothing but an attempt to subsidize the fishing experience with coolers full of meat?
    You obviously haven't done much fishing if you compare a 15lb king to a 15lb halibut. Halibut fishing is meat hunting. Nothing too enjoyable about it, except the end result of some vacuum packed fillets.

  7. #7
    Member fullbush's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    2,674

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Phish Finder View Post
    For me, a halibut charter is a way to reduce the costs of halibut so I can eat it more often. I don't halibut fish for the fun of it, though it can be very enjoyable. I compare cost to meat when halibut fishing. I'm happy with 30-40 lbs of halibut filets for the cost of the charter. That makes the fish less expensive than buying it from the store plus the joy of fishing (being on a boat, meeting new folks, etc...). When the cost of a charter is higher than the cost of buying the same fish from the grocer, my halibut fishing will decrease dramatically, as will my intake.

    270, this line sums up my reasoning, "You have to realize that reducing the number of fish by 50&#37; doesn't equal a 50&#37; reduction in weight, which is what matters when a GHL is involved."


    Isn't this approach somewhat counterproductive and will mandate a slot or size limit?
    Quote Originally Posted by 270ti View Post
    You obviously haven't done much fishing if you compare a 15lb king to a 15lb halibut. Halibut fishing is meat hunting. Nothing too enjoyable about it, except the end result of some vacuum packed fillets.
    I'm w/ you guys, I take a charter for the meat. I refuse to buy halibut for 18 bucks a lb at Carrs....Ridiculous, when you can buy cod for 4.99, and IMO it's a far superior product





    I'm taking a poll
    <--------click this star if you think I should run for Gov

  8. #8
    New member
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Soldotna
    Posts
    5,639

    Wink Been there, done that . . .

    Quote Originally Posted by 270ti View Post
    You obviously haven't done much fishing . . Halibut fishing is meat hunting. Nothing too enjoyable about it, except the end result of some vacuum packed fillets.
    Actually, I have . . done enough fishing, that is, to have concluded that halibut (meat) fishing is not quite sport fishing. Thanks . .

    As you say, and I concur, nothing enjoyable about it. And I agree with fulbush: halibut is vastly inferior to cod (and most everything else) as table fare. Dry and tasteless, my theory is that no one really eats halibut, they eat what they put on it.

  9. #9
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    13,391

    Default

    If this goes through, folks will soon learn what an excellent fish pacific cod is. No longer will they be considered "trash" fish by the fleet, but rather they'll be used to fill the box on combo charters. That wouldn't be a bad thing at all.

  10. #10
    Member Phish Finder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Searching for more cowbell!
    Posts
    1,945

    Default

    Marcus, halibut is delightful table fare when cooked to a medium rare on the grill and allowed to finish cooking on a tray before serving. The cod debates I've had on charters have been peculiar. Most folks don't seem to want to take their cod. That's great for a meat fisher as I haven't seen the worms that seem to scare everyone else away from cod.

    I'll take cod and chips over halibut and chips anyday but a nice chunk of halibut seared off and finished in the oven or on the grill is quite tasty IMHO.
    ><((((º>¸.·´¯`·.¸¸.·´¯`·..¸¸ ><((((º>`·.¸¸¸.·´¯`·.¸¸><((((º>

    "People who drink light 'beer' don't like the taste of beer; they
    just like to pee a lot." --Capitol Brewery

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    2,448

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Marcus View Post
    Actually, I have . . done enough fishing, that is, to have concluded that halibut (meat) fishing is not quite sport fishing. Thanks . .

    As you say, and I concur, nothing enjoyable about it. And I agree with fulbush: halibut is vastly inferior to cod (and most everything else) as table fare. Dry and tasteless, my theory is that no one really eats halibut, they eat what they put on it.
    Now that explains why halibut is 20.00 a lb and cod is 5.00 a lb. Marcus the rest of the world does not agree with you. Its dry if you dont know how to cook it. I would be happy to swap you two pounds of cod for every pound of halibut. Does anyone else want to take me up on this??

  12. #12
    New member
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Soldotna
    Posts
    5,639

    Thumbs down Halibut . .

    Quote Originally Posted by kgpcr View Post
    Now that explains why halibut is 20.00 a lb and cod is 5.00 a lb. Marcus the rest of the world does not agree with you. Its dry if you dont know how to cook it. I would be happy to swap you two pounds of cod for every pound of halibut. Does anyone else want to take me up on this??
    Maybe so, maybe so, but I think halibut sells for $20/lb. for the same reason McDonalds, Arby's, Burger King, and such are able to sell the trash they do and call it good food . . it's so doctored up with this, that, and the other thing that folks are really eating what's on it and in it. The "rest of the world" is welcome to their dietary preferences. I'm quite happy with mine, thank you.

    Believe me, if I had any halibut I'd jump at your offer to trade 2-1 for cod. I only look stupid.

    And halibut is dry, not because I don't know how to cook it—I do—but because it lacks fat.

    To each his own . . good thing we're not all alike.

  13. #13
    Member sayak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Central peninsula, between the K-rivers
    Posts
    5,788

    Default

    Ah Marcus, you're always bashing the poor halibut. You know, they didn't name it "holy fish" for nothing.
    Plain, poached young halibut with boiled taters on the side is food fit for a king.
    Oh, and I enjoy fishing for halibut; much like ice fishing. you never know what you'll pull up from the depths.

  14. #14
    New member
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Soldotna
    Posts
    5,639

    Wink Just for the halibut . .

    Quote Originally Posted by sayak View Post
    Ah Marcus, you're always bashing the poor halibut. You know, they didn't name it "holy fish" for nothing.
    Plain, poached young halibut with boiled taters on the side is food fit for a king.
    Oh, and I enjoy fishing for halibut; much like ice fishing. you never know what you'll pull up from the depths.
    Holy fish? Who the heck calls halibut "holy" fish? More like "wholly tasteless" fish to my palate. I kinda think of halibut like I do about eggplant and skim milk . . not quite there, bland and insipid.

    But I yield. Knowing you to be an honest and earnest man, I'll take your word on poached, young halibut being delicious. Invite me to dinner sometime . . I might get converted . . have a real, Damascus Road experience, and all that.

    That said, I've eaten lots of halibut and enjoyed it when deep-fried in my sister-in-law's batter. 'Course it was the batter, not the halibut that tasted good. Why anyone would bother with halibut when salt-caught reds are available is beyond me.

    To each his own . .

  15. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    2,448

    Default

    Marcus we agree on something LOL.... to each his own. I just had halibut dredged in melted butter then topped with crushed Ritz crackers and baked for 12 minutes at 425. All of us ate like kings! moist and sooo full of flavor MMMMMMMMM. I would also agree fresh from the salt reds are darn good as well. I had that last night on the grill. did i mention i love fish??

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •