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Thread: caribou hunting rifle/bullets?

  1. #1

    Default caribou hunting rifle/bullets?

    Hi All,

    I'm getting ready for my first caribou hunt and am planning to hunt with my trusty 25-06. Someone insisted I should stick with 117 grain bullets, but I got the 100 grain bullets. The store won't take ammo back and the best that I can understand is the grain measures the "punch" of a bullet, so how different are these grains? Okay to hunt caribou with the 100s??? I don't intend to take a shot at more than about 100 yards, cause that's where I'm comfortable and consistent, if that makes a difference... Thanks for any knowledge or thoughts!

  2. #2
    Member Birdstrike's Avatar
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    My son recently shot his first caribou with cheapo 140 grain (bullet weight) Remington Core-Lokts in 7mm-08. The bullet passed through both lungs and exited in the other side. Caribou are lightly armored. Hopefully someone will chime in with specific info on your caliber.

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    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    It matters much more how that 100gr. is constructed rather than the fact the bulllet is 100gr.

    If that bullet is of tougher construction (Barnes TSX, Partition, Accubond, A-Frame) it would be just fine. I'd personally avoid one of the "varmint' type bullets in that caliber for a caribou. The 25-06 is perfectly fine for caribou for distances well in excess of 100 yds but if that's where you're confident there's nothing wrong with that at all.

    Can I suggest you post the brand and bullet type listed on the box since there are several varmint and big game bullets produced in those weights for that cartridge?

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    Member The Kid's Avatar
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    Alot depends on the construction of the bullets in question. If both are of the same construction, ie. both Speer hotcores, then the 117 would likely penetrate deeper. But a 100gr barnes X or Nosler partition, would almost certainly penetrate better and leave a better wound channel than say a Sierra Matchking that weighs more at the muzzle. The way a bullet behaves when it strikes an animal is more important than the weight of the bullet.

    With normal bullets like Hornadys or Remington Core Lokts. I would think you should be fine for caribou. Inmight hesitate to use them for larger game but caribou aren't generally too awful tough. Shoot em in the front half and enjoy your steaks.

    PS. I was typing this as others were replying with pretty much the same good advice. Good luck.

  5. #5

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    Hi,
    Sorry to be slow in reply-the JOB got in the way of hunting plans for a few days! Thanks for the advice! The bullets are Federal Premium 25-06 REM. 100 grain Barnes triple-shock.

    I feel a lot better about shooting them now-gonna go shoot them and do finishing touches on sighting in the rifle tomorrow and then I'm ready!

    Again, thanks for the input!

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    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Birkebakke View Post
    The bullets are Federal Premium 25-06 REM. 100 grain Barnes triple-shock.
    No worries with that round and caribou. It's among the better choices for bigger game in the 25-06. Put one through the pump room and get to skinning!

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    .243w with 100 grn bullets is an AWSOME Caribou round, actually for just about everything in Alaska. I used one for years to great effect on hundreds of Caribou , and I figure a .25 inthe same weight but faster cant be bad at all

    As always, Use what you can hit with best, and git yer Hunt on.
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

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    Member ruckus's Avatar
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    I had a similar question with my 30-06 but maybe needing to tone down my bullet from 180 grain. From my recent experience, I should have gone lighter, flatter shooting. Another suggestion is to take a range finder. 100 yards is difficult to judge, and you will see a good caribou out there and need to know where to hold on the big guy. Best of luck.

    btw. 180 grain barnes X will put down a caribou too.
    "Next time you feel important, try telling someone elses Chesapeake to do something"-- anonymous

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