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Thread: Advice on grinding my own wheat into flour

  1. #1
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    Question Advice on grinding my own wheat into flour

    So just tonight we ground up some hard red wheat into flour. I was shocked I got more cups from the grinder than I put into it; I was sure it would be the opposite. Best guess now is that the result is super-sifted vs. packed, thus the larger quantity.

    So my question: Should I base my recipes off of the amount of wheat I pour INTO the grinder and then use right away in bread, or the amount I get OUT of the grinder. Seems a dumb question, but if OUT is the answer and I grind a couple weeks worth, it'll re-settle and my measurement will be off.... I think....

    So I'm leaning towards INTO instead. Anyone that's already traversed this route want to chime in and help?

  2. #2
    Member Ak Bird Brain's Avatar
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    It's going to take some trial and error with your recipes. My wife just started grinding flour this year, If I had a nickle for all the cussing coming out of the kitchen because this particular type of flour didn't grind as fine as the last one she tried. Or this one effected the elasticity of the bread differently than the last one.
    I would go with the measurement from after the grind and start from there.
    Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day,
    Teach a man to fish and he'll also learn to drink, lie, and avoid the honey do list.

  3. #3

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    OUT for sure, measure flour not wheatberries. The extra volume is from air and fluffiness. Adjust your grinder if the grind isn't fine enough. Sift if it re-settles. If you're worried you can measure by weight instead of volume. But most important of all, don't "grind a couple weeks worth", since using fresh flour is the whole point to grinding your own!

    White flour has been degerminated so it stays edible for months, but whole grain flour contains oils (volatile fatty acids) that will go rancid within a couple of weeks (depending on storage and temperature). If you grind more than a few days' worth, refrigerate or freeze it in an airtight container, and use it soon. Same day grinding tastes best!

    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...l=1#post990150
    The Laurel's Kitchen bread book listed here discusses whole grain grinding, storage and use in detail.

  4. #4
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    Default Thanks

    Thanks for the replies; good, all. Much appreciated, as is any further advice.

    Did I mention that I'm brand spankin' new to this wheat-grinding thing?

  5. #5
    Member ironartist's Avatar
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    gotta start somewheres, hey call me when you wanna shoot,
    also one of my guys thats on the slope they grind flour too I could line ya up about the 12th after he gets back
    Visions Steel/841-WELD(9353)
    "Rebellion is in my blood, I was born an American"
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  6. #6
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    Default I will

    Quote Originally Posted by ironartist View Post
    gotta start somewheres, hey call me when you wanna shoot,
    also one of my guys thats on the slope they grind flour too I could line ya up about the 12th after he gets back
    I will sometime. I couldn't yet; not a minute to spare to go plink a few; I even had to do my final sight in on the drive out to the hunt area - bad me.... Now that caribou season is over I'm back at the ranch, but have a big outdoors job to get done before the snow starts flyin'. It's always somethin'..... but yet here I am playing with my new wheat grinder and typing on a forum, so go figure....

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