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Thread: Parker 2310 vs North River or Hewescraft

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    Default Parker 2310 vs North River or Hewescraft

    I'm looking for information before I purchase my first boat. The boat will be used in the Juneau area, mostly for fishing for me and my wife. We obviously will have company and friends on the boat. I've been looking at 3 boats in particular: mid 1990s Parker 2310 SC with 2005 Yamaha 250, 2006 22 ft North River Sea Hawk wi 250 HP Yamaha, and 2008 Hewes Craft 22 ft Ocean Pro w/ Yamaha 250. I've been researching the pros and cons of aluminum vs fiberglass but my question concerns the "off shore" bracket or extended transom. The two aluminum have an extended transom mount while the Parker does not. What is the benefit of the extended transom? How does it affect handling and stability? Is there any other major difference? Do any of you have any comments or first hand information on any of the boats I'm looking at? Thanks in advance.

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    Member smtdvm's Avatar
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    Default boats

    All of these are good boats for S.E.. Aluminum is definitely easier upkeep. The North River is the best build of the three. Likely best resale too. The extended hull gives you just that. More hull length, while sparing cockpit space among other pluses. I'm in Juneau. PM me if you want to talk.

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    I'm in Juneau as well. I just bought a 22' Hewescraft Ocean Pro, with Honda 150. I don't think you'll go wrong with the Hewes, and the 250 will be nice. I wish I had more power on mine, but it was too spendy. You need to look at what you want to do with the boat. I wanted a boat with a big enough cabin for our family of four. I planned on doing some fishing, and alot of exploring with the family.

    Turns out I've been doing more fishing than expected, so it would be nice to have a larger deck. But, I still wanted a large cabin. As the kids get older, I'll probably do more exploring and camping, so the larger cabin will come in handy.

    I'm an aluminum fan, so I'll always go with the aluminum. But, those Parkers do look like nice fishing boats. I used to have a North River skiff, and just sold it. They hold their value and are built like a tank. I would go with a hard top, if that makes a difference between the three boats you are looking at.

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    Member Sobie2's Avatar
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    I too live in Juneau. I have a 23' Fiberglass Uniflite (I am in the middle of repowering and actually have in my driveway an extended outboard bracket), had a 27' Uniflite, and recently sold my pride and joy 22' OceanPro for a home building project , and been on a 23' Parker without the extended transom.

    All three boats will serve you well. The aluminum boats will have better fuel economy than the Parker, but the Parker will be more comfortable in the sloppy seas we get when its rough out. The NR is a soft top (yes?) but the price is great (if its the one in Haines). The OceanPro's enclosed hard top is fantastic. We have a remote cabin and beached the Hewescraft a lot and that is the biggest boat you want to beach with any regularity.

    The extended transom tends to give a boat slightly better performance in that the supposedly the outboard being further aft is running in "cleaner" water and people who have done the conversion are always happy. After owning and fishing on both boats with and without the extended transom I can say that the extended transom is harder to fish around when trolling and landing fish because you have to hop over the back of the boat and get onto the transom, AND the trolling motor being mounted on the extended transom and further back is subject to tangling with the downrigger rod and cable.

    The benefit of the extended transom is performance and fuel economy and the biggest plus is the "extra" space of the motor not having a splashwell and the boat's ability to take waves to the stern better.

    Price always plays a big role in boat shopping, all three boats are great boats, and I'd never get a canvas topped boat of that size, I'd only get a hard top enclosed boat (in this case the Parker or Hewescraft). But you can have a local shop make you a hard top.
    If you were never going to beach the boat I'd get the Parker it will be the most comfortable on the water in terms of running and fishing, for the all arounder no questions I'd get the OceanPro. but if the NR which is also an awesome boat is $10K less or more and the least expensive I'd push for that and then allocate those dollars to a hard top with bulkhead door.

    You have lots to ponder but you shouldn't be dissapointed with any choice.

    Last thought cleanliness is important I'd scruitnize each boat and whiche ever boat looks newest is an added perk... it is hard to get excited about spending 30-50k on a used boat that lookes used and has rust streaks on it.

    Sobie2

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    Thank you all for the replies and information. I really appreciate it. So now you bring up another point, Sobie2 and Ruger. Why not the canvas top? What are the drawbacks of that?

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    Member Rob B's Avatar
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    Soft tops are wet, cold, wet, harder to heat up and hold the heat, wet, leaky when raining, have to build a roof rack to carry extra gear, wet........ Soft tops have thier purpose, but when you are buying a boat for the long haul, don't settle for something you will have to modify to that extent to get what you really want in the first place. Just my .02 from my mistake.

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    I agree with what's been mentioned about softtops. In Juneau with all the rain, you also have to look out for mildew of the canvas. Hard tops just offer alot more room inside, and are easier to maintain.

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    Timely question, as I'm looking to upgrade from my 17' Alumaweld Stryker, thanks for all the good feedback so far. Two interesting boats out there right now, a 20' Hewescraft HT (2001, 115 & 8hp Yamahas), and a 20' North River ST (2005, 115 & 8hp Yamahas).

    I'm hearing good things about the extended transom and the ride of the North River, but really would like a hard top after having canvas for 5 years. Any additional pros and cons are welcome!

    I'm also concerned about launching these boats alone due to the increased weight. I can easily manage my 17' by myself, and am guessing I could still handle a 20' - any thoughts about that? I generally launch out of Amalga in Juneau.

    Thanks in advance!

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    I grew up running a 21 ft. Hewes Sea Runner w/ a soft top. I love the boat, but the soft top doesn't really cut it. My dad has a 2008 the exact Ocean Pro you're looking at. It's a great boat. handles big seas no problem. You can beach it when needed. The 250 gives it plenty of power. You'll learn to like the extended transom. It's very usefull to have a place to stand on the stern. The Ocean Pro is heavier but manageable with one person.
    I'd agree with you, but then we'd both be wrong.

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